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GWR K22 Full Brake from Worsley Works etchings (00)


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Inspired by Robin on A Nod To Brent I decided my fleet lacked a GWR Full Brake. with help from the chaps on ANTB I selected the Worsley Works etched sides and ends for a K22 Toplight.

 

Edit to say I have had an issue with photo download so this will continue shortly......

Edited by colin penfold
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With apologies for the delay here is the build in pictures.

 

Firstly I dismantled an elderly Hornby R429 Comp

 

post-12721-0-80871300-1473361889_thumb.jpg

 

The body moulding is a one piece item roof, sides and inner ends. In order to enable me to get the sides off without ruining the roof, I cut a small portion of the sides away to enable the rest of the side to clear the inner end. I then cut the bulk of the sides of by carefully scoring along the roof line, gradually deepening until I could "snap" the side off

 

post-12721-0-70595700-1473361897_thumb.jpg

 

I then took a Stanley knife and files to the roof to remove the toilet tanks, ribbing and vents

 

post-12721-0-24561700-1473361907_thumb.jpg

 

I then fitted Roxey Mouldings door handles and grab handles to the sides. I made up the long waistline grab rails from staples, drilled through the sides for a firm fix.

 

post-12721-0-32070300-1473361916_thumb.jpg

 

post-12721-0-27843700-1473361935_thumb.jpg

 

post-12721-0-07777700-1473361945_thumb.jpg

 

I then took heart in mouth and wielded a soldering iron to join sides and ends together. Here is the finished shell drying after a good wash to remove flux

 

post-12721-0-32904700-1473361953_thumb.jpg

 

I then used a paper template to help ensure the rain strips were marked out evenly on both sides of the vehicle (using photos as a guide)

 

post-12721-0-23096600-1473361961_thumb.jpg

 

I then fitted them using 0.5mm square section plastruct

 

post-12721-0-57877800-1473361969_thumb.jpg

 

Also note I fitted the end handrails from nickel silver wire

 

post-12721-0-00726300-1473361980_thumb.jpg

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Continuing the build, I fitted the lower steps for the guards doors from scrap brass and staples

 

post-12721-0-39492400-1473362852_thumb.jpg

 

I decided the Hornby bogies were not right. I found that the K22 had American Bogies. I tried to ignore it but couldn't. I was about to order some replacements when I remembered a Ks Autotrailer kit I had part built as a teenager. No way was it ever going to get finished, and nor was it worth selling so it donated its bogies to the K22.

 

Here are the K's bogies and the Hornby ones

 

post-12721-0-50182600-1473362862_thumb.jpg

 

Sides removed from both

 

post-12721-0-34892600-1473362872_thumb.jpg

 

post-12721-0-32766100-1473362881_thumb.jpg

 

Ks sides glued to Hornby bogies

 

post-12721-0-97168400-1473362888_thumb.jpg

 

post-12721-0-88336200-1473362899_thumb.jpg

Edited by colin penfold
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I used Halfords pre-primer and grey primer to prepare the body shell

 

post-12721-0-31125100-1473363247_thumb.jpg

 

I then painted the roof with railmatch roof grime

 

post-12721-0-25170300-1473363258_thumb.jpg

 

I then sprayed the sides with Precision Paints GWR Freight Brown

 

post-12721-0-49702400-1473363266_thumb.jpg

 

Picked out door handles in humbrol brass

 

post-12721-0-05163900-1473363275_thumb.jpg

 

I then added transfers from PC Models ( Now HMRS)  weathered and assembled. The sides still clip into the floor, the bogies still fit using the Hornby mounting although I cut a bit off the floor to lower the ride height. The Hornby glazing still fits inside the new body ( I had to scrape off the printed corridor handrails and toilet window whiteouts. I used a Stanley knife and then polished out the scratches using toothpaste)  Having said that it fits, the Hornby glazing sits a little bit inboard of the sides and I may well decide to fit new glazing after all

 

post-12721-0-61273300-1473363277_thumb.jpg

 

 

I have to admit it wasn't the best spray job ( I an new to airbrushing ) but I am OK with the results. The eagle eyed among you will have noted the lack of corridor connections. I want to wait until I can run trains on my layout before I decide on what couplings to use. For that reason I decided not to do the corridor connectors until I decide on couplings. In the meantime it can be test run using the original Hornby hook and bars which are still fitted to the bogie. Otherwise all that's left to do is a coat of Klear.

 

Hope you like. Thanks again to GWRRob for the advice and sharing some photos of the prototype

Edited by colin penfold
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That looks great Colin.). I've inherited quite a few old Hornby carriages that I have earmarked for such projects and as such it's very useful to see each individual set out with detail and clarity of method rather than the "the cut the sides" off and "ta-da" style sometimes seen. As an aside, I did like the "made in Great Britain" stamp on the bottom of the coach

 

David

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Impressive stuff and quite inspirational.

Even the underframes on these coaches can be improved but the tiebars will always be a bit chunky.

 

 

Edited to remove duplication

Edited by rovex
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Colin

 

Did you need to form the tumble home on the sides?

 

Many thanks

 

David

 

Hi David, yes I did.

 

As I try to avoid working with Brass I do not own any folding aids so I sandwiched the sides between two pieces of wood in the vice and used another piece of wood pressed against the tumble home to gently fold the whole side in one go. I used the "tuck in" on the ends as a guide as to how much was required and where the fold line should be vertically on the side. I perhaps should have said earlier, I was originally going to use the Hornby ends but decided they didn't look good enough - the moulded corridor connectors were particularly poor. Having decided to buy the ends from Worsley for that reason, I was certainly glad of them when it came to the tumble home.

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Just a thought - it might be easier to use the 'Southern' version of the Hornby 'GWR' coaches for Toplight conversions as they don't have those thick transverse ribs.

 

That's good advice Bernard. I used a coach that I had already which was surplus to requirements, but it certainly makes sense to buy something that minimises the work if you buy a donor coach with this conversion in mind.

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I found the SR coaches are easier to do with less moulding on the roof to trim off, shot myself in the foot I've done a Comet brake composite with one and will have to put the cross bands on.

That looks a nice first attempt Colin it's always the first one which is the hardest, will we be seeing more from The C.P. Works in the future?.  :senile:

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I found the SR coaches are easier to do with less moulding on the roof to trim off, shot myself in the foot I've done a Comet brake composite with one and will have to put the cross bands on.

That looks a nice first attempt Colin it's always the first one which is the hardest, will we be seeing more from The C.P. Works in the future?.  :senile:

There's another two (links in my signature) and a bullied restaurant car on the to-do pile. Having said that, autumn is coming and I will retreat to the man cave for more tracklaying.

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An alternative way of forming a tumblehome is to use a piece of steel bar, longer than the body side, and after laying the side on a soft surface-rubber mat or towel for instance, gently roll the bar on the side, producing a curve, and checking against the end.  Easier than it sounds.  A nice model, by the way.

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  • 2 years later...

Just found this Colin - very nice work. It's given me the idea of getting some etched sides to go on my Mailcoach kits rather than try to paint the clear plastic sides - which has put me off starting them for over 20 years...

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