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Building 5 inch gauge wagons by Doug Hewson

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At the end of May 2017 the HMRS will be publishing this book, "Modelling 5 inch gauge wagons" by Doug Hewson. Until 31st March it will be available at the very attractive advance subscription price of £30 plus £6.50 p&p (UK). After 31st March the price will be £50 plus p&p. All advance subscribers will be listed in the book. The reason for taking this approach is that the book is rather outside the Society's normal range of activities and it therefore needs to gauge demand before printing.

Although the topic at first sight might not seem of interest to small scale modellers, in fact over a third of the book consists of photos and descriptions of the prototype, and in addition there will be some three dozen A2 and A3 drawings especially prepared by Doug, as well as a chapter on how the most common types of wagon brake gear work. The book also includes 13 sections on building specific wagon types. In general the book deals with wagons built between 1923 and the end of steam.

Doug has a long history in modelling, having been one of the owners of 3H Models and having been involved with several well known 4 mm layouts. More recently he has run D Hewson Models, supplying parts and kits to the 5 inch wagon market, though he has now sold this and retired.

Except where it is impractical, Doug's motto is to build models as the prototype was built, so his drawings, while produced for 5 inch gauge modellers (and half size for that scale), show a fantastic amount of prototype detail.

320 pp plus about 36 large drawings, over 900 photos, 26 tables of prototype information, numerous diagrams in the text. A4, hardback.

How to subscribe?

Well, the HMRS had hoped to have its new trading website up and running by the end of 2016, but it is still some time off. Therefore, if you are interested please e-mail the HMRS Treasurer at [email protected], providing full contact details. He will then tell you ways in which you can pay for the book. Alternatively, if you would like to know more about any aspect of the book please PM me. Or go to www.hmrs.org.uk and download a leaflet about the book.

Jonathan David

HMRS Publication Co-ordinator

 

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Hi Jonathan,

 

I am quite interested in this. Is there any chance of an example or two?

Say a page of text referring to a drawing. The said drawing. And possibly a page of "how to".

 

 

Kev.

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For £30 +postage Im not going to argue. Even if the specific diagrams arent applicable to me, Im much more interested in the construction explinations of the prototype.

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Sent an email to the treasurer about this.  Sounds to be just up my street.

 

John

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As requested here are three sample pages. The resolution had had to be reduced right down to get the files to below the maximum for RMWeb, and the one with the colour photos has then had to be turned from a  PDF to a JPEG to reduce the size further (my first attempt at a PDF of this page was 16 Mb!). There are a lot of colour photos of prototypes but I chose the page with mono ones for simplicity in posting it. The error in the caption mentioned below will be corrected.

 

Wagons book example page 57.pdfWagons book sample page 89.pdf

post-13650-0-57688600-1485284920_thumb.jpgJonathan

Edited by corneliuslundie
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As requested here are three sample pages. The resolution had had to be reduced right down to get the files to below the maximum for RMWeb, and the one with the colour photos has then had to be turned from a  PDF to a JPEG to reduce the size further (my first attempt at a PDF of this page was 16 Mb!). There are a lot of colour photos of prototypes but I chose the page with mono ones for simplicity in posting it.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gifWagons book example page 57.pdfhttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gifWagons book sample page 89.pdf

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gifWagons book example page 269.jpgJonathan

Well looking over the three pages you have shown, I can already see an error with page 89. The third open is of a London North Western diagram 9 rather than Lancashire &Yorkshire. Minor error, but someone had to say it.

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Working vacuum brakes wow! Where abouts is this railway, would love to see more pictures of the railway

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Working vacuum brakes wow! Where abouts is this railway, would love to see more pictures of the railway

 

Gilling, North Riding of Yorkshire, a 5" Ground level railway

Edited by pete55
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Gilling, North Riding of Yorkshire, a 5" Ground level railway

 

This is a link to their website http://www.rsme.org.uk/ the main items about one of the largest model railways in Britain is under "mainline rally". Doug Hewson has connections with another similar site nearer his home in Lincolnshire.

 

I have a few of my photos here http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/gilling

 

I would like to emphasise what a "different" book this will be. As Jonathan has said it will have many A2 and A3 drawings - they examine a wagon in great detail. There are also other detail drawings - such as the hybar in the page shown earlier. Although appearing to be aimed at model engineers I sincerely believe all modellers will find this book valuable. On this site (and others) questions are often posed about how to finish the brake linkages on various models (Parkside and Slaters notably). The drawings will help to explain how to do this, because they show the prototype. Many of the prototype photos were also new to me when I saw an early manuscript.

 

Please consider an advance order for this book.

 

Paul Bartlett

HMRS EC member

Edited by hmrspaul
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Email sent.

Dribbling furiously again....

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The contents list in the downloadable leaflet lists the prototypes which are dealt with in the construction chapter (though not the actual diagrams as the techniques described generally apply to any similar diagram). The prototypes covered in Chapter 6 are opens including lows, mineral wagons, vans and brake vans for the Big Four and "BR steam" periods. There are some examples of pre-Grouping vehicles mainly to show the sources of the Big Four designs. For most sections there is a description of the development of the type with tables listing all the diagrams. Not quite all are vehicle types covered by such tables as for some the information is just too vast but is in any case available elsewhere..

If you are looking for modelling details there is a full page diagram showing the variants in corrugated ends of vans. Anyone like to guess how many?

I hope this helps.

Jonathan

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Planning for bookshelf space so within an A4 book all those A2 and A3 drawings which I assume will be fold out; how thick will this book be?

 

Also wandering slightly of topic.  Shown on the sample page (57), the D&C Mk. III brake gear has pushrods that are parallel with the sole bars and thus tapered brake shoes to match the wheel coning. Was this standard on this type of brake gear as opposed to the more usual angled pushrods?

 

I know nowt about D&C wagon brakes.

 

P

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The intention if it is affordable (I amstill awaiting a quotation) is for the book and the drawings to be within a box. The book itself will be about 25mm. I don't have the sample box with me but I think it added about the same, so 50 mm or 2 inches.And I don't know the answer about push rods but will make enquiries. Now you have pointed it out I need to know as someone who models the GWR.

Jonathan

Edited by corneliuslundie

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Planning for bookshelf space so within an A4 book all those A2 and A3 drawings which I assume will be fold out; how thick will this book be?

 

Also wandering slightly of topic.  Shown on the sample page (57), the D&C Mk. III brake gear has pushrods that are parallel with the sole bars and thus tapered brake shoes to match the wheel coning. Was this standard on this type of brake gear as opposed to the more usual angled pushrods?

 

I know nowt about D&C wagon brakes.

 

P

That's interesting, I had never considered that pushrods would be right angles to the cone of the wheel, but it makes perfect sense.

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I have been looking at all the drawings I can find of GWR wagons. Many do not have details of the brake gear in plan form, but of those I have found only that for the Diagram D23 van has the push rods at an angle to the solebar. The drawings found with parallel push rods include both those with DC brakes and those with conventional brake levers, as well as the Thomas brake example. However, I assume that when it adopted RCH fittings for its wagons – which was later than some other companies – this would have included a switch to angled push rods.

So yes, GWR brake blocks must have had angled faces.

The standard coning for RCH wagons was 1 in 20. I assume that this must have been the same for all vehicles. Looking at this in terms of push rods at right angles to the wheel, with the distance between the central brake cross shaft and the back of the brake block being about 2 ft 6 in or so for a 9 ft wheel base wagon, the push rod would be at right angles to the tread if the lateral displacement was 1.5 inches. Of course for 10 ft wheelbase wagons the displacement would need to be a bit greater. I do not have a drawing with the lateral measurement shown but it appears to be around 1.5 inches on the RCH drawings in the Ince Waggon Co book. To confound matters further, there were type of brake gear (eg SR Monarch) where the push rods were distinctly different lengths.

However, another question: were brake blocks suspended at an angle to the solebar? In the few photographs I can find they do not appear to be.  If they were not then they must have been shaped to match the coning.

Happy modelling.

Jonathan

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Thanks for taking the time to pen type a reply.

With a number of chassis kits designed for the 4 mm market appearing over the last few years that include the facility to incorporate the 1 in 20 inclination into the pushrods it got me into thinking  when the prototype started using it.

 

P

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Thanks for taking the time to pen type a reply.

With a number of chassis kits designed for the 4 mm market appearing over the last few years that include the facility to incorporate the 1 in 20 inclination into the pushrods it got me into thinking  when the prototype started using it.

 

P

It might have something to do with bottom doors on opens. 

For example, an L&Y D3 van has a cross shaft and pushrods parallel to the solebars, but a Midland D299 open has angled pushrods to clear the door swing.  

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Should we move this discussion to a new thread? I can see it having a life of its own.

More research obviously needed.

Jonathan

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Just a reminder that there are just three weeks left to order this book at the much reduced pre-publication price. 

To place your order please send an e-mail to the HMRS Treasurer at the address given in the leaflet (attached). He will then arrange payment details with you and collect information such as the address to which the book is to be delivered.

Overseas postage rates are now available.

Jonathan

Leaflet Jan 2017 revision.pdf

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The pre-publication offer has now closed. Many thanks to all who have subscribed.

Hopefully, the book and drawings will be available at the end of May.

Jonathan

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The pre-publication offer has now closed. Many thanks to all who have subscribed.

Hopefully, the book and drawings will be available at the end of May.

Jonathan

 

Thanks, now we sit and wait!

Correos are currently upgrading the springs on their delivery vans in anticipation of this tomes arrival!

 

Mike.

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According to my calendar May has now been and gone.  

 

So far I've seen no notifications anywhere that this book has already been published (in which case where's the copy that I pre-ordered?) or is going to be published later than planned.

 

Does anybody have any idea what's happening?

 

Dave

Edited by S-Club-7

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