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Jack P

Southern Railway Modelling - Rule Britannia

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On 16/08/2019 at 19:38, KeithHC said:

Did I see the second unit close up a big gap after it came out of the tunnel.

 

Keith

 

Sure did, I might've been a bit unclear when I was talking about coupling. As the buffers are not sprung on these units i need to find an appropriate way of coupling the two 5 car sets to each other!

 

12 hours ago, Bulleidnutter said:

Slightly off topic but your distant peg is backwards..... It is rather impressive seeing a full 10 car unit. Somehow a 5 car doesnt look right. 

 

 

Excuse the ignorance, distant peg??

 

Yes! I was lucky to pick up a second set of centre cars cheaply. Transfers have arrived to renumber them correctly, but i'm trying to be diligent and clear my bench before I start new projects.

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Just a quick update today.

 

I wanted to post about panel line washes, this is a technique i've only somewhat recently adopted, but i'm really happy with the results. For those not familiar with what 'Panel line washes' are, they're just a very thin, enamel or acrylic paint, designed to flow via capillary action into the grooves, and into and around details on a model. I've become a very big fan of this method, mainly because I think it produces a nice subtle effect that really brings details to life.

 

 

48570962992_c95294136c_b.jpg

 

Here's an example, the right hand side has been treated, the left is as is (post repainting). I've found that cleanup is actually very relaxing, I usually apply the wash with a 00 brush, and then use a 000 brush moistened with thinner to clean and blend the wash as needed. For larger areas you can use a cottonbud. 

 

48570817481_4dc6e29c94_b.jpg

 

Here's the other side. Still needs details picked out like door handles and the chalk panels, and transfers. The wash will flow a lot nicer if there is a gloss or semi gloss surface for it to run into, and from my experience the wash needs to be opposite to the base paint for obvious reasons. This Van C is a Railmatch acrylic base, with Tamiya enamel wash (no varnishing) but you could do an enamel base, followed by an acrylic varnish, and then enamel wash and it should result in something satisfactory. I am still experimenting, so if anyone is interested, I can report back on my findings. I'm not a professional or anything close, but I thought i'd share this technique just in-case it's useful to someone!

 

Finally, here's another long term project that is tantalizingly close to leaving the workbench.  A malachite green 2-Hal

 

48570816611_b6d0ec87b7_b.jpg

 

To be honest, I started this project before even checking if any of these ended up in malachite. If anyone is more knowledgeable than I, please let me know. I do have some books to read through but have not found the time yet. I also ordered an Olive green 2-Bil with the intention of updating it into malachite also - if anyone would like to warn be to not proceed before I do this, speak now!

 

I would also like to slide a quick thank you in here; To all the patrons, contributors and lurkers of this thread, those who offer advice and critique, both on the thread and via pm. Thank you all! I'm a better modeller for it.

 

Also a call to arms - if anyone sees anything  glaringly obvious or incorrect, please let me know, I am always open to learning something new or having my current way of thinking challenged!

 

 

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Nice explanation about  the panel line washes, they are perfect for bringing out detail in models.  I've found you can get different effects if using them over a matt surface as they don't flow quite the same and the surface holds the colour a bit. Will you try an acrylic wash? I've made and tried a few, using screen wash or acrylic thinner, but found they're yet to flow the same as enamel although with a bit of work you can get some good results.

I'll look forward to seeing more of your experiments.

Steve.

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48 minutes ago, sb67 said:

Nice explanation about  the panel line washes, they are perfect for bringing out detail in models.  I've found you can get different effects if using them over a matt surface as they don't flow quite the same and the surface holds the colour a bit. Will you try an acrylic wash? I've made and tried a few, using screen wash or acrylic thinner, but found they're yet to flow the same as enamel although with a bit of work you can get some good results.

I'll look forward to seeing more of your experiments.

Steve.

 

Hey Steve,

 

I certainly think so, I don't think it's the be all, end all of weathering techniques, but it's certainly a useful one! The van you can see here has a matte surface and the enamel wash stains slightly, with some careful brush application you can streak this - direction is important because as you say it holds the colour. I agree about the acrylic washes, I've used games workshop, the 2-Hal was done with acrylic wash over enamel clear coat, I find that instead of capillary action you need to load the brush and run it along the grove, or panel line and then clean up afterwards. I've also found the acrylic wash, or at-least the GW stuff makes the finish on enamels a bit cloudy.

 

 

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Interesting...

 

I've just been painting all my NPCS into Olive. Half of it was in that hideous Malashite Green colour. :P 

Edited by sem34090

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11 hours ago, sem34090 said:

Interesting...

 

I've just been painting all my NPCS into Olive. Half of it was in that hideous Malashite Green colour. :P 

 

Where's the angry react! 

 

I've actually bought a tin of olive myself.. just for a little bit of variety! 

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12 minutes ago, Jack P said:

I've actually bought a tin of olive myself.. just for a little bit of variety! 

We will win, some day. The Men in Malachite will fall.

 

And the combined masses of the Men in Umber and the Men in Olive, and perhaps even a Woman in Umber-and-Cream (No one in particular coming to mind here...) will see them crushed, and when that day comes you will see the true light. 

 

( :P )

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On 19/08/2019 at 09:33, sem34090 said:

Interesting...

 

I've just been painting all my NPCS into Olive. Half of it was in that hideous Malashite Green colour. :P 

 

Looks like you may be tuned in to the wrong channel - malachite only here! :rolleyes:

 

Personally, I favour a more integrated, all-encompassing and tolerant approach - olive, lined and unlined, Maunsell black, wartime black with sunshine lettering, and of course, malachite. After all without malachite one cannot enjoy a spam can or two! :)

 

Tony

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On 19/08/2019 at 03:40, Jack P said:

I wanted to post about panel line washes, this is a technique i've only somewhat recently adopted, but i'm really happy with the results.

 

On 19/08/2019 at 05:34, sb67 said:

Nice explanation about  the panel line washes, they are perfect for bringing out detail in models.

 

Slightly late response, but this is a technique that I also use; I acquired, along with lots of other useful stuff, it on the Missenden Abbey weathering course with Mick Bonwick.

 

I mainly use "Black Night" Panel Line Wash from Ammo by Mig and "Black Smoke Wash" from Wilder Nitro Line, applied with a rigger brush in the corner of whatever is the object; the wash runs along the moulding lines as you have each described and enhances the moulding considerably.

 

Here are some Kent coalfild wagons on which I used this approach - amongst others!

 

SJPP713004102180713.jpg.5e917a171d6c03923201cded919e02f9.jpg

 

Tony

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8 hours ago, Tony Teague said:

I mainly use "Black Night" Panel Line Wash from Ammo by Mig and "Black Smoke Wash" from Wilder Nitro Line, applied with a rigger brush in the corner of whatever is the object; the wash runs along the moulding lines as you have each described and enhances the moulding considerably.

 

Are either of these Acrylic by any chance Tony? I've spent the last few days trying some different Acrylic washes, and none of them seem to flow as well as the enamel ones, I can't seem to get a good middle barrier between enamel base coat and enamel wash - which seem to flow the best. I have tried Humbrol Clear, which sprays really nicely but gets cloudy when I attempt cleanup.

 

I could always move to an acrylic base coat, but I do like working with enamels.

 

Thoughts and comments appreciated from all 

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These are enamel but I have used them on top of acrylics and I don't detect any problem; I have never used a barrier between (in either direction), just ensured that the underlying coat is properly dry.

Tony

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On 19/08/2019 at 03:18, Jack P said:

 

Excuse the ignorance, distant peg??

 

 

The distant signal is the signal in front of the tunnel mouth with the sighting paint behind it. The arm is on the wrong side. 

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It's been a little while since my last update.

 

I've just taken two weeks off from work. While I've managed to spend a bit of time at my workbench, I've stayed away from the computer and have done other exciting things. Like going to the dentist and getting my hair cut.

 

I'll start with the bad. I spent most of Sunday and Monday fixing a rather unfortunate mistake. I periodically take all of my locos out of storage to run them, dust them, and just generally check over them. I've started devising a register of what needs doing to what, and the condition they are currently in etc. Anyway, I had my P class out on the bench, resting on a paper towel. Unknown to me, the container of enamel thinner next to it had split at the bottom. You can probably imagine what happened next, being that paper towels are rather absorbent - you can probably imagine what happened next. 

 

I managed to strip the P of all its separately fitted detail - which was surprisingly easy. Hattons definitely took a pragmatic approach to construction. Once stripped I cleaned it all up and the usual painting process ensued. Frustratingly, I wasn't able to find any 1947 condition photos of 1557, so I wasn't sure if the side tanks were lettered the same as 1558 which had the word and the number on the tank or the same as 1556, which had the word on the tanks and the numbers on the bunker. I also think because i've used 1558 as a base, it's incorrect for 1557, but I think the difference will be so slight that unless you're directly comparing them, you won't know!

 

48708555336_80c7a46822_b.jpg

 

48708220128_8b29fe6acd_b.jpg

 

48708717172_a10164f22b_b.jpg

 

While the loco was apart I decided to paint the cab interior cream, instead of the odd yellow colour it was. I fixed one of the cab doors in the open position too, it adds a little bit of interest I think. Crew still needs to be added, as well as some further weathering, but I think the contrast in tones of black do a pretty good job. 

 

The next, kind of bad bit came after My lovely partner gifted me with this (birthday). It's no secret that I think the jubilees are one of the most beautiful locos ever built - and I've been hanging out for one for ages!:

 

48708781347_a6741f1cae_b.jpg

 

48708781277_f9bb369d57_b.jpg

 

I gave it a coat of Humbrol clear (which I find amazing, thank you to whoever recommended it to me). And gave it a light weathering. In my usual fashion, this was before checking that the model was correct for a 1947 version of 'Australia' - thanks to @Brocp for shattering that illusion, but also providing me with plenty of Fowler tendered class members to renumber to. I managed to take the cab off and remove the numbers, however some of the paint came of the sides in the process, I have some Vallejo paint in that that is supposed to match, so I will try and patch it up as best I can. Here's hoping it will be hidden under the numbers anyway.  I will update on this one once suitable transfers have arrived!

 

In slightly better news, I managed to finish off this:

 

48708220073_786a83f086_b.jpg

 

48708220113_2c06815be6_b.jpg

 

I need to double check the number is correct and give it a coat of dullcote, there are a few more wagons that are in line to leave the paintshop soon, I should have enough for a sizable freight!

 

Finally, there's this;

 

48708717182_4a41a84f2e_b.jpg

 

Still waiting on transfers to complete. I am seriously smitten though. Both the Jubilee and the B1 are fantastic models, and I can't wait to finish them off, weather them further and add them to the fleet. Did they ever venture on to southern metals in 1947? I'm not sure, but do I care? Hmmmm.\

 

That's all for now 

 

Jack

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On 21/08/2019 at 16:31, Tony Teague said:

 

 

Slightly late response, but this is a technique that I also use; I acquired, along with lots of other useful stuff, it on the Missenden Abbey weathering course with Mick Bonwick.

 

I mainly use "Black Night" Panel Line Wash from Ammo by Mig and "Black Smoke Wash" from Wilder Nitro Line, applied with a rigger brush in the corner of whatever is the object; the wash runs along the moulding lines as you have each described and enhances the moulding considerably.

 

Here are some Kent coalfild wagons on which I used this approach - amongst others!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/SJPP713004102180713.jpg.5e917a171d6c03923201cded919e02f9.jpg

 

Tony

 

I really like the MIG stuff but I tried some Wilder washes and found they need loads of mixing and dried with a sheen, they also haven't kept very well and the pigment has almost solidified at the bottom of the pot.

 

I really like the P class and that's a fine birthday present Jack. The weathering is great, very subtle. What did you use to create the soot effect along the top of the loco? That looks very convincing. 

Steve.

 

Steve.

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58 minutes ago, sb67 said:

 

I really like the MIG stuff but I tried some Wilder washes and found they need loads of mixing and dried with a sheen, they also haven't kept very well and the pigment has almost solidified at the bottom of the pot.

 

Steve.

 

Steve

I agree; I find that Panel Line Washes separate very easily and do indeed require a lot of re-mixing before use.

Tony

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17 hours ago, sb67 said:

I really like the P class and that's a fine birthday present Jack. The weathering is great, very subtle. What did you use to create the soot effect along the top of the loco? That looks very convincing.

 

 

Thanks Steve! I'm pretty happy with how the P turned out too! The soot effect along the top is the same weathered black/brown mix as the lower portion gently wafted across the top with the airbrush. I personally find this to work much better than powders.

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Hello guys!

 

A few projects on the go at the moment, I'll let the pictures do the talking - of course if you have any questions, please ask away!

 

48570963137_95b28e5374_b.jpg

 

48741102282_f5ca9dc713_b.jpg

 

48741102217_49a98c3051_b.jpg

 

48736765112_dd1e6b815e_b.jpg

 

I got really sick of the HMRS transfers for the 'SOUTHERN' Soach lettering being rubbish, so I had some commissioned. Will update you on how they are when they arrive. 

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The B1 looks excellent as does the rest of the stock. Are you modelling the Central region of the Southern Jack to warrant a 6 wheel tender 'King Arthur?' Or is it just for fun?

 

Regards Connor

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18 hours ago, CCGWR said:

The B1 looks excellent as does the rest of the stock. Are you modelling the Central region of the Southern Jack to warrant a 6 wheel tender 'King Arthur?' Or is it just for fun?

 

Regards Connor

 

Thanks Connor, I wasn't sure about the B1. I thought it might be a little heavy, but I think I can live with it. I need to get some more tonal variation into my weathering at some point. 

 

As for the Arthur, I've moved my focus much closer to ex LBSC/SECR, which as you say, warrants a 6 wheel tendered Arthur. I have another one waiting in the wings, which I think might go green!

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1 hour ago, Jack P said:

 

Thanks Connor, I wasn't sure about the B1. I thought it might be a little heavy, but I think I can live with it. I need to get some more tonal variation into my weathering at some point. 

 

Nothing wrong with the weathering on the B1, considering your period i.e. 1947

 

Connor

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2 hours ago, CCGWR said:

Nothing wrong with the weathering on the B1, considering your period i.e. 1947

 

Connor

 

This is true, maybe it's been worked hard? The only continuity issue I have is that 1189 entered service in August of 1947, and i'm not sure it would've got this dirty this quickly! 

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18 hours ago, Jack P said:

 

This is true, maybe it's been worked hard? The only continuity issue I have is that 1189 entered service in August of 1947, and i'm not sure it would've got this dirty this quickly! 

It definitely would have gotten that dirty mate. I've got photos of pretty new Streamlined Duchesses that are filthy and that was when the railways had a lot of cleaners compared to after the war.

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Please excuse the poor quality iPhone photos. 

 

48778253012_bcdd790404_b.jpg

 

48778252937_3491145ee3_b.jpg

 

Managed to get 'Sir Constantine' numbered and lettered over the weekend. Still needs some touching up and weathering. I realize there are no snifting valves when there should be. There are a few avenues I'm pursuing for having these made, I can't seem to produce an acceptable version myself. 

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On 16/09/2019 at 03:45, Jack P said:

Hello guys!

 

A few projects on the go at the moment, I'll let the pictures do the talking - of course if you have any questions, please ask away!

 

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48570963137_95b28e5374_b.jpg

 

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48741102282_f5ca9dc713_b.jpg

 

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48741102217_49a98c3051_b.jpg

 

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48736765112_dd1e6b815e_b.jpg

 

I got really sick of the HMRS transfers for the 'SOUTHERN' Soach lettering being rubbish, so I had some commissioned. Will update you on how they are when they arrive. 

 

Great photo's Jack, 1189 looks stunning! :)

Steve.

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