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Embankment Building Problem


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I have built an embankment for my layout but the cardboard formers seem to be showing through the plaster cloth even when painted.

My method was as follows:

1 Glue cardboard formers to baseboard about five inches apart, these formers started out as parcel type boxes.

2  Crumpled up newspaper packed between the formers.

3  Three layers of over lapping plaster cloth added to cover newspaper.

4  Plaster cloth painted when hard.

 

Result, a line or ridge is visible under the hardened plaster cloth at every former, are the formers meant to be covered as well as I didn't do this, I only put newspaper between the formers.

I have pulled the embankment back up as it looked ridiculous and I doubt scatters or static grass would cover the former 'ridges' but I need to know where I have gone wrong before I have another go.

 

Any advice would be most welcome

Thanks in advance

Michael

Edited by michaelp
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Embankments do not slope uniformly. They tend to be steeper towards the top and less so at the bottom, due to rain washing material down.

 

Similarly, cuttings acquire a noticeable bulge towards the bottom due to the same effect, but modified by the engineers keeping the cess clear by throwing muck back up the bank.

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I use a wire mesh over the formers to prevent them showing. I also put a single layer of plaster bandage on first, and let this dry before adding further layers. This reduces the weight that the mesh has to take, reducing the risk of formers showing.

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I use a wire mesh over the formers to prevent them showing. I also put a single layer of plaster bandage on first, and let this dry before adding further layers. This reduces the weight that the mesh has to take, reducing the risk of formers showing.

 

An alternative might be to use plasterers scrim. I've built embankments on an expanded polystyrene base with the scrim hiding the 'regularities' of cuts on the base. The scrim is flexible and sticky and a good base for a thin layer of plaster. I've been pleased with the results. Just a thought.

 

Doug

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Scrim needs a lot of support behind it, just as you have given it Doug. The wire that I have used is self supporting to a large extent and given it comes in 450mm wide roles can be used to do large areas very quickly. 

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