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19 hours ago, Northroader said:

Looks like a new front and back for the bunker, it’s a shame, but you’ll look back at it and laugh, I’m sure. It’s too well crafted to junk now you’ve got this far.

i might be tempted to bring the wings in a bit on the rear spectacle plate, but then I’m a bodger.

I've 'agreed' to your suggestion - as opposed to your admission (true or false) to being a bodger!

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Using magnification takes a bit of getting used to.  I used loupes similar to these as a dentist before I retired and found them invaluable for that, in fact I wondered how I ever managed without them, but that was to be able to see very fine detail and enable me to work with a better posture.

 

For modelling, I find 2.5x is just too much and you have to have the work too close to your eyes to be comfortable.  I use a set of Lightcraft LED supporting glasses, using the 1.5x lenses (they come with 1.5x, 2.5x and 3.5x), which sit over my reading glasses.  Unfortunately it seems they are no longer manufactured (according to the Farnell website).  Alternatives they suggest are of the headband magnifier type which are a bit more cumbersome.

 

Jim

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...I use these - they clip on ordinary glasses and also flip up whilst still attached so that I don't walk into things (too often).  These are 3x mag:  I also have some at 2.5.  They came from HS Walsh in Hatton Garden (jewellery tool suppliers: they have a website).  I've tried other things but none are as useful as these clip-ons - normally known as my "extra eyes".

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Posted (edited)

kitpw, thanks for the input regarding clip on extra lens. I will try to find something similar to try.

 

I have chained down my load of carboys and added the return to plates. I could do with some chalk marks as well and possible safety warnings on the side. The straw has been stuck down with diluted resin W. The straw is just cut up coarse string. I don't know if this is a authentic load carried like this but I am sure someone will point me in the right direction if not.

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Edited by airnimal
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...this is the link to the clip-ons at HS Walsh https://www.hswalsh.com/product/eyeglass-spectacle-binocular-magnifier-3x-magnification-hh46 in case you haven't found it already.  I also have some similar clip-ons which cover the whole spectacle lens but I find them less useful as they are heavier and I can't use them like bi-focal glasses: the small ones work more like a an enhanced bi-focal spectacle lens and are much easier in use.  I have had a struggle with sight for some years and have tried several options for magnification - none as successful as these things. I hope they help you out.

 

The carboys are an unusual and very convinving load -  great stuff!

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kitpw, with your help I have ordered a pair of clip on magnification glasses from HS Walsh.

 

One of my favourite builds this year was the Midland  dumb wagon because I had photographs of both sides which is very unusual. I was able to follow every blemish and scratch without guessing what was on the other side which is what I normally have to do. I have just started a very small N.S.R single plank bolster wagon which was photographed in Swindon yard by the G.W.R. officials cameraman when it was involved in a derailment. There are a couple of cracking pictures in the book Freight wagon and loads  in service by J.H.Russell of this wagon which shows all the rough bits as well as the faded lettering. 

 

So so with this in mind I have knocked up the basic body. I don't have any spilt spoke wheels left so I am having to use the last pair of solid spoke I have in stock which I can swap when I next buy wagon wheels. 

The photos are dated April 1910 so the wagon is probably 30 years old when the derailment happened. 

The bodywork has a few splits and holes which will be incorporated in my model. On one end there is a hole which I have put in before i glued the plank in place.

 

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Posted (edited)

In the photographs I am using one side of the wagon has damage to the plank at the top leaving the capping strip 

exposed. If I modelled this in plastkard as I usually do it would be a weak point prone to damage. 

So I have decided to model this in metal. But where to find metal thin enough to look good but thick enough to be able make reasonable well. I have being making the capping strip from 5 thou plastkard, but to cut metal strip from similar size metal is beyond me. 

 

So so I had a look in my store of metal and found some 40 thou wide by 8 thou thick brass strip which I bought over 40 years ago. There was on 2 strips but enough for a couple of wagon worth. 

 

I cut a piece the length the size of the side and drilled a series of holes with a 16 thou drill. I then turned down a brass lace pin in the mini-drill with needle files to the smallest size possible before the head disappeared.  This is going to be oversize by a long way but other than soldering the pin in place and filing flush I don't think I have much option.

The pins will need shortening before pushing them in pre-drilled hole in the plank. I may solder them in the brass strip before blackening with in Birchwwod gun blue.

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Edited by airnimal
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Mike, question re. the recent L&Y wagons. What is the source of those rather nice numberplates? In 4 mm scale I've only had POWSides dry transfers for these - they tend to disintegrate but that may just be lack of practice on my part.

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You can cut 5thou brass in the same way as you would styrene with a sharp craft knife, but taking many more strokes. To stop it curling up don't start the cut right at the edge. 

 

Jim

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Compound 2632,  the numberplates came from Barry Lane at Keighley. You will be able to find him through the L&Y society. He's builds gauge 3 models of the L&Y.

 

Jim, I think cutting thin  metal strip and keeping it flat and straight would be more trouble than it's worth. The brass strip I have used is over size but I think the ease of using this far outweighs the over scale appearance.

 

I have done one side and only broke one drill. I think the idea is sound so I am going to keep going. I don't think this would have been strong enough in plastikard. 

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Mike,

 

I think that you are correct to drill through the strip and solder the pins to the strip as a representation of the prototype construction - I suggest that you may wish to use contact adhesive (Evostik) to keep the strip lying flat apart from where the plank is damaged.

 

best wishes, Graham

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This little wagon is going to take me forever because there are so many nuts and bolts in many different sizes.

I hope I get to the end of the build without breaking to many drills. I am running short of certain sizes and there doesn't look likely that there will will be any exhibitions this year to restock.

 

i can only do so much at any one time without taking a break. When I have done one side I have to lay the wagon down on a soft cloth so I don't squash any of the soft bolts on the other side. 

 

My my magnifaction clip on glasses have arrived and I have used them for a short time, but I think it is going to take me a little time to get use to them. The joys of old age. How did craftsmen managed before electricity gave us good lighting ?

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Small drill-bits are available on-line, without shipping charge. (Other brands available, but some of them are utter rubbish.) I bought some of these a few weeks ago. They are certainly OK for drilling plastic, maybe not up to heavy work in metal. Or you could buy on-line from Eileen's Emporium, paying more per drill bit, and paying shipping, but almost certainly getting better quality.

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....hope you get used to the clip-ons.  I get small drill bits (1mm and upwards)  in 10s from Tracy tools - https://www.tracytools.com/drill-bits - I've never had a problem with quality or delivery but I've no idea how they compare on price.  For anything smaller than 1mm diam, it's back to HS Walsh who do packs of 10 from (I think) 0.4mm diam - they are shanked for a 2.35mm collet.

Kit PW

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I get small drill bits from a well-known auction website, marketed as PCB drills, available from 0.1mm up to 2.00mm in 0.1 increments should you so wish. They all have a 1/8” shank so fit in the dremmel. 

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Many thanks for the information about drills. I still have some in stock so I hope I will not need any just yet but it's frustrating when you get to the last one and the shops are closed. 

 

I have made a couple of errors like I always do mainly through lack of observation and poor workmanship. The 2 small metal strips on the body side were put on in the wrong place so were renewed but again I have made them a fraction to long. There is a chamfer on the bottom of the plank and the metal strips should sit above that and I have made them to the bottom. Not a large mistake and I only noticed it when I came to put the chamfer on and realise it would take the bottom of the strip off. There is still a few bits left to do on this side before I tackle the other side and both ends. 

 

I wonder at times how long it takes me to build a wagon ? Perhaps I should keep a record but that might frighten me.

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Tricky said:

I get small drill bits from a well-known auction website, marketed as PCB drills, available from 0.1mm up to 2.00mm in 0.1 increments should you so wish. They all have a 1/8” shank so fit in the dremmel. 

 

Hi Tricky,

I find those PCB drill bits very brittle and snap at the slightest provocation, this effect is exacerbated by the fact are aggressively fluted so tend to "grab" and pull the bit into the hole.

I do use them in hand drill though.

Proxxon make some nice shanked drill bits that retail at less than £4 for a box of three (same size) but not all diameters are available, Tamiya also market some down to 0.2mm  diameter although these are more expensive for single bits.

 

 

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Mike,

I get my small drills from Drill Services Horley.  Excellent quality and the common sizes we need are not as expensive as those usually sold at exhibitions. They do mail order and in normal times delivery is quick. 

I also use an Expo 'wishbone' drill sharpener which is great for when a drill does break. 

Ian.

 https://www.drill-service.co.uk

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 I have finally completed one side now that I have added the horse hook and label clip. The chamfer on the bottom of the plank was done by putting a small nick at the start and finish and then scrapping along with a wide flat scalpel blade resting on a piece of nickel.

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Stunning as always, Mike.

 

Jim

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Every day is an inspiration.  Such a superb quality of work on this thread I look forward to reading it. :good_mini:

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