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The buckets supplied with the Minerva 57XX/8750 Panniers are now available separately. The have working handles and are supplied in packets of six for a Fiver plus £1 P&P. Holes can be drilled to provide hours of frustrating entertainment for Liza. They are available from the Minerva stand at shows and directly by telephone, mail or from our webshop: https://www.minervamodelrailways.co.uk/product/6-model-buckets/

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Disappointed to see that these models do not include the rivets that hold the lugs to the body.

 

Are those lugs too thick? Temporary removal of the handles would allow some careful thinning with a fine file, but it would be nice if you didn't have to.

 

Is there a seam where the rolled body is joined?

 

I haven't had a chance to run a rule over these but I suspect the conical angle is near correct BUT that rim at the top looks seriously overscale.

 

How easy is it going to be to convert these to S7? Did anyone at Minerva even think about making these universal?

 

And what about a broad gauge version?

 

Really, at 83 pence per bucket I think we can expect more accuracy. Come on Minerva - try harder. Might I suggest a re-issue with the above improvements, say by early April?

 

N Ether-Happy

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Disappointed to see that these models do not include the rivets that hold the lugs to the body.

 

Are those lugs too thick? Temporary removal of the handles would allow some careful thinning with a fine file, but it would be nice if you didn't have to.

 

Is there a seam where the rolled body is joined?

 

I haven't had a chance to run a rule over these but I suspect the conical angle is near correct BUT that rim at the top looks seriously overscale.

 

How easy is it going to be to convert these to S7? Did anyone at Minerva even think about making these universal?

 

And what about a broad gauge version?

 

Really, at 83 pence per bucket I think we can expect more accuracy. Come on Minerva - try harder. Might I suggest a re-issue with the above improvements, say by early April?

 

N Ether-Happy

Chaz,

We're happy to replace them with these, but they might be tad too big:

 

http://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Durable-Plastic-Bucket-14L/p/543007?CAWELAID=120135120000015256&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAGID=52608958944&CATCI=pla-309019237913&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0b_QBRCeARIsAFntQ9qphgfbvN9yYC_d9ylxx27bCEqrKuamWcWats5g_6dVXcqvSs3aQMUaAlrhEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

Regards,

 

Chris

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Interesting that a 1:1 bucket is only 17p more than a 1:43.5 one; clearly not related to the amount of plastic involved. 

 

Your buckets are much nicer though - although I am puzzling over how I will put the legend "FIRE" on mine. Maybe I will just paint 'em red and leave it at that.

 

Chaz

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Extensive research has unearthed this photo of a surviving broad gauge bucket.

 

post-9071-0-86251800-1511113777.jpg

 

It's excellent condition can be readily explained - after Churchward's death, since the great man had been known to use it to wash his socks in, it was given a place of honour in a cupboard at Paddington.

 

Please note that the broad gauge bucket was far more stable than the inferior standard gauge buckets but Swindon was forced to convert to SG and the remaining BG buckets were sold off to staff who used them for storing coal.

 

Chaz

Edited by chaz

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That so-called 'Broad gauge bucket' of yours is actually much more rare.

 

It's actually a 'Stephenson' bucket. George Stephenson, and his son Robert, both had big feet. This particular bucket was specially made so either of them could sit & soak by the fire, without causing a mess. The local tinsmith went by the name of Willie Eckerslike, whose family roots came from Bolton. Rumour has that once the Stephensons went to Darlington, Daniel Gooch took over the house, and used the 'Broad Gauge bucket'. Once he moved down to Paddington Basin, and took residence there, and he took the bucket with him.

 

Such are legends made.

 

In cold dark nights in February, you can still smell his socks.....

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Interesting that a 1:1 bucket is only 17p more than a 1:43.5 one; clearly not related to the amount of plastic involved. 

 

Your buckets are much nicer though - although I am puzzling over how I will put the legend "FIRE" on mine. Maybe I will just paint 'em red and leave it at that.

 

Chaz

I have the same problem with lettering. I don't know if anyone does transfers. An alternative marking for me is BR (W). As for the price of a Wickes bucket, I suspect the production is a bit bigger than ours.

 

Chris

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Oh, this is a thread about actual buckets.

 

I thought it would be about EE Type 4s.  :senile:

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Oh, this is a thread about actual buckets.

 

I thought it would be about EE Type 4s.  :senile:

 

 

?

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English Electric Type 4s - Buckets because they sounded like a bucket of rusty nails.....

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Extensive research has unearthed this photo of a surviving broad gauge bucket.

 

attachicon.gifbroad gauge bucket-1.jpg

 

It's excellent condition can be readily explained - after Churchward's death, since the great man had been known to use it to wash his socks in, it was given a place of honour in a cupboard at Paddington.

 

Please note that the broad gauge bucket was far more stable than the inferior standard gauge buckets but Swindon was forced to convert to SG and the remaining BG buckets were sold off to staff who used them for storing coal.

 

Chaz

I've had a bath in one of these 'broad gauge buckets', a long time ago.........  As a child in front of the fire...

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I've had a bath in one of these 'broad gauge buckets', a long time ago.........  As a child in front of the fire...

 

 

Me too. A typical working class house with no bathroom and a necessary in a lean-to would have it hanging on a nail outside the back door. Those were definitely not the days.

 

Chaz

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English Electric Type 4s - Buckets because they sounded like a bucket of rusty nails.....

 

 

Is that why the nickname originated? 

 

I never did find out, but when I was a young early 60s trainspotter "bucket" was the shout which went up when one was seen in the distance approaching on the ECML. 

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Is that why the nickname originated? 

 

I never did find out, but when I was a young early 60s trainspotter "bucket" was the shout which went up when one was seen in the distance approaching on the ECML. 

 

Are you sure it was 'bucket' that was shouted, if a steam hauled train was expected?  :no:  :no:  :nono: 

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I was studying one of these in a mirror but it was just a 'pale' representation compared to the original . . . sorry, couldn't resist . . . :onthequiet:  

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I was studying one of these in a mirror but it was just a 'pale' representation compared to the original . . . sorry, couldn't resist . . . :onthequiet:  

As a penance for this truly egregious sin you must buy two packs of buckets. 

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As a penance for this truly egregious sin you must buy two packs of buckets. 

 

Bucket - A little buck.... (ISIRTA)       

 

 

(I'm getting mine by the loco.)

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