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Annie's Virtual Pre-Grouping, Grouping and BR Layouts & Workbench


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Thanks Adam.  Compared with some of the problems with getting engines from later versions of Trainz working properly in TRS19, the old models from TS2004 usually need a lot less messing about with to make them look good.  With 'Iford Manor' I mostly had to do a little texture editing work combined with editing the reflection characteristics of the loco body mesh, but with the 45xx you see in the background I had a few mesh material filename conflicts as well which required a fair bit of frowning at to solve.

I haven't had a lot to do with DEM data, but while taking parts of this same route back to the 1880s with my Cornish Broad Gauge project I struck more than a few anomalies where the landscape  had been either misread or had been changed in modern times.  Eventually I will go back to my 1880s project, - only I kind of burnt myself out with it, - and perhaps after doing this 1950s version I might feel like going back to it.

 

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Edited by Annie
crimes against good grammar
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Is it 'Iford Manor' or 'Ilford Manor'? The picture clearly shows 'Ilford', but you twice spelt it 'Iford', & so does Accurascale:Screenshot2021-01-31at11.56.34_2400x641.

 

I couldn't find a picture of the real loco. :dontknow:

This webpage has almost all 'Manors', except, of course, "7824 Ilford Manor". :unsure:

https://www.national-preservation.com/threads/collett-manor-class.998683/

So I'm a little confused. (Which is my normal state of mind anyway, especially when I'm concerned with British railway. :D )

 

 

 

 

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Jake, here's a not very good photo of 'Iford Manor' looking woebegone and only two years away from scrapping  The photo was taken in 1961 when it was wearing lined green paintwork.

My model came to me from Paulz Trainz with its name misspelt and I'd forgotten to fix it before taking the screenshot.  Confusingly the BR Database website spells the name incorrectly as well and I'm sure that hasn't helped any with the wrong spelling getting out into the wild.

 https://www.brdatabase.info/locoqry.php?action=locodata&type=S&id=7824&loco=7824

 

5FxTemo.jpg

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"Ilford" is a dull town in Greater London.

"Iford" can be a village in East Sussex, a suburb of Bournemouth or a hamlet in Wiltshire/Somerset near Bradford on Avon. (  http://www.bradfordonavonmuseum.co.uk/iford )

 

"Iford Manor" is probably named for the latter, very much in GWR territory!

 

People probably mix Ilford/Iford up thanks to the once popular photographic brand "Ilford".

 

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1 hour ago, Hroth said:

People probably mix Ilford/Iford up thanks to the once popular photographic brand "Ilford".

That sounds very likely. 'Iford Manor' now spelt correctly.

 

huc2u5o.jpg

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Annie, I do like,  and approve of,  your frequent use of things being "frowned at" ..... Very Lady-like!... but scary when I stop to think about it. 

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34 minutes ago, DonB said:

Annie, I do like,  and approve of,  your frequent use of things being "frowned at" ..... Very Lady-like!... but scary when I stop to think about it. 

You wouldn't want to be at the receiving end of an Annie frown... 

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31 minutes ago, Hroth said:

You wouldn't want to be at the receiving end of an Annie frown... 

 

Presumptuous of me, I daresay, but I think we may venture a little familiarity amongst friends, so I'll venture to say that I suspect Annie may be a Black Belt in Paddington Bear Stares (amongst, no doubt, other of the martial arts).

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I've been stupid crashed out sleepy for most of yesterday and unable to stay awake.  I'm not sure where I left my displeasure.  If anyone finds it make it a nice cup of tea, but stay out of biting distance.

The height of mastery of the frown is the state of 'no-frown' where the practitioner's mastery of the frown is so complete that they do no longer need to frown because the mere threat that they may is sufficient to bring about the desired effect.

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2 hours ago, Annie said:

The height of mastery of the frown is the state of 'no-frown' where the practitioner's mastery of the frown is so complete that they do no longer need to frown because the mere threat that they may is sufficient to bring about the desired effect.

 

Nimzovichian wisdom. Chess grandmaster Aaron Nimzovich (1886-1935) claimed that a threat is stronger than its execution.

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I think I have 83F Truro's 'Hook Norton Manor' almost right.  The tender is a little dark, but then the colour shade of tenders didn't always match the engines they were coupled to during the 1950s from what I've seen in some photos.  The lighter weight 'Manors' tended to gravitate to the old Cambrian lines and it was the 'Granges' that were mostly Cornish engines.

 

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Playing trains Track testing.  There's several single and double slips around Ponsandane and Long Rock and while they are interesting to put together they can be a bit of a trial during testing.

 

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A member of the Creator Group has been working on a model of the Wisbech & Upwell Tramway for a while now.  He's made the new Version 2.0 of his layout available for the group to have a look at to see if there's anything that might need fixing.

My brain is presently stuck in a loop going, 'Wow! .....Wow! .....Wow!........

 

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12 hours ago, Jake The Rat said:

claimed that a threat is stronger than its execution

I found that to be useful when bringing up the children! As their mother used to say, “Fo you have any idea what you would do if they called your bluff?” To which the answer was, “Of course not.”

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Out and about playing trains doing serious track testing on the Cornish Mainline.  Trackwork realigning and repairs to signalling are the tasks in hand at the moment.

I took this snap of No.4553 crossing the Marazion Marshes on the way to St Erth.  I took some other snaps as well, but I didn't like them much.

 

53lZxTB.jpg

 

 

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On 17/07/2021 at 10:01, Annie said:

A member of the Creator Group has been working on a model of the Wisbech & Upwell Tramway for a while now.  He's made the new Version 2.0 of his layout available for the group to have a look at to see if there's anything that might need fixing.

My brain is presently stuck in a loop going, 'Wow! .....Wow! .....Wow!........

 

qvQcS9F.jpg

 

RK1XeWj.jpg

 

45XbEoL.jpg

 

PeY5P1m.jpg

 

JqN27XZ.jpg

 

KOUSgTI.jpg

 

Suitably flat.  Other than the stone 'Metcalfe' cottage, the workaday buildings suit the 'agri-desert' of the Fens very well.

 

Remarkably, the Wisbech canal did have locks, but not in the conventional way of inland waterways for climbing hills, but flood locks or sluices at each end. I assume against tidal floods (the Nene had tidal floods as far as Peterborough until a sluice was built at the Dog in a Doublet near Whittlesey, IIRC in the late 1930s)  . Lock gates at Wisbech would mean that the canal was not necessarily at the same level as the Nene.

 

Outwell sluice:

 

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On 18/07/2021 at 08:18, Annie said:

Out and about playing trains doing serious track testing on the Cornish Mainline.  Trackwork realigning and repairs to signalling are the tasks in hand at the moment.

I took this snap of No.4553 crossing the Marazion Marshes on the way to St Erth.  I took some other snaps as well, but I didn't like them much.

 

53lZxTB.jpg

 

 

 

What a lovely depiction of the countryside

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1 hour ago, Edwardian said:

What a lovely depiction of the countryside

Thanks James.  Egg on face moment though as the train is approaching Hayle on the up line.  I got my snaps muddled.

The long road bridge in the background is part of a bypass built in the 1980s and is a perfect demonstration of the original builder's big mistake with using Google Earth as his primary reference. 

This evening the bridge and its bypass road were removed with extreme prejudice and the landscape restored to how it should have been for the 1930s.  There's still quite a bit to do in this area, but I wasn't going to let an aberration like a 1980s bypass road remain for long.

 

PrVhXG8.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, Edwardian said:

Remarkably, the Wisbech canal did have locks, but not in the conventional way of inland waterways for climbing hills, but flood locks or sluices at each end. I assume against tidal floods (the Nene had tidal floods as far as Peterborough until a sluice was built at the Dog in a Doublet near Whittlesey, IIRC in the late 1930s)  . Lock gates at Wisbech would mean that the canal was not necessarily at the same level as the Nene.

 

Outwell sluice:

 

1455522690_OutwellSluice2.jpg.3b05345af48387160b68eb9901db3c03.jpg

The W&U layout has come on quite a bit since I last saw it in version 1 and it's still a WIP.  I also thought that stone cottage wasn't the best choice, but the creator group has former fen dwellers amongst its membership and I'm sure they'll give the layout's builder some useful guidance to help him sort out the finer details.

Nice photo of Outwell by the way.

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I've been doing some catching up on this thread. 

 

The bit about mis-spelt Manor names reminded me that mis-spelt GWR nameplates were quite common in the early days.  The savants at Head Office had a penchant for ancient Greek and Roman mythology but many of the suggestions that they came up with were 'all Greek' to the people that actually built the engines. 

 

The most striking example was an engine that was supposed to be named 'Laocoön' but actually came out as 'Lagoon'.  It was never changed and looked a bit out of place amongst all its classical companions.

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Definitely not a cheer up picture.

On this day in history – Saturday 21 July 1934, the last of Brunel’s timber viaducts in Cornwall (Collegewood Viaduct, near Falmouth) was closed having carried traffic since August 1863. The last train to pass over it was the 10.50pm Falmouth to Truro.  :cry:

 

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Timber viaducts have a relatively limited lifespan and a railway that would want to run heavier locomotives on the line would consider replacement of timber structures with cost effective masonry ones worth the cost and effort.  At least they didn't think of slapping concrete around the existing viaduct a viable solution!

 

Having said that, the timber Barmouth Viaduct, built for the Aberystwith and Welsh Coast Railway (later the Cambrian) opened in 1867, operates in an even more severe environment than the Cornwall ones and is still going strong! Even so, the GWR and later WR didn't consider running anything larger than a 43xx or Dukedogs across it, or that in more recent times only DMUs were allowed to cross it, though apparently loco hauled trains are once more permitted.

 

image.png.900a3f2e2355ff678cc75191180e2d31.png

Wikipedia: Barmouth Viaduct

 

 

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The Barmouth Viaduct is an amazing piece of timber construction and long may it continue.

 

The one good thing about the photo I posted is that it shows some of the surrounding countryside that I haven't seen in an historic photograph before.  

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2 hours ago, Hroth said:

Timber viaducts have a relatively limited lifespan and a railway that would want to run heavier locomotives on the line would consider replacement of timber structures with cost effective masonry ones worth the cost and effort.  At least they didn't think of slapping concrete around the existing viaduct a viable solution!

 

Having said that, the timber Barmouth Viaduct, built for the Aberystwith and Welsh Coast Railway (later the Cambrian) opened in 1867, operates in an even more severe environment than the Cornwall ones and is still going strong! Even so, the GWR and later WR didn't consider running anything larger than a 43xx or Dukedogs across it, or that in more recent times only DMUs were allowed to cross it, though apparently loco hauled trains are once more permitted.

 

Don't forget the other timber viaducts on the same line. There's one over the Afon Dyfi by Dovey Junction and another between Barmouth and Harlech. There was another over the Dwyryd at Pont Briwet that also carried a road but that was replaced as part of a road improvement scheme. They originally intended to keep the old one as a cycle path but accidentally undermined it whilst building the new one. They've done a lot of work on them all recently and they should be god for years to come. Hopefully someone will get their act together and sort out ERTMS for steam so we can see a return of the daily summer Cambrian Coast Express services that operated a few years back.

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The Cambrian is something that has caught my interest from time to time, but with only Rob Dee's GNoS 4-4-0 reskin, his coach reskins and some wagons by Bob Sanders as the only assets for Trainz it does seem a bit impossible.  It's good that Network Rail have been undertaking repair work on the viaducts, but after some of their recent vandalism/attempted vandalism with their electrification projects I  wouldn't exactly call them trustworthy despite their corporate blurbs about preserving the historic past for future generations. 

 

And on the subject of preserving the historic past I went and had my first COVID jab today.  New Zealand  has been a bit slower with rolling out its vaccine programme, but with our 'Fortress New Zealand' locked down borders it hasn't been such a pressing issue as it has been for some countries.  First to get it have been those who maintain the border as well as medical staff and now it's the turn of those over 65, folk with disabilities and folk who have chronic illnesses.

After living in various combinations of pajamas, baggy cardigans and tee shirts for months I had to find some suitable going out of the house clothes that were in a good enough state for me to be seen wearing them out in public.  I did get sorted out with something acceptable after a lot of frowning and muttering.  The official COVID jabbatorium was just down the road a bit in the village so in company with my daughter I decided to walk there under our very grey and frowny Winter skies instead of taking a taxi. 

All went well, but the only small irritation was after spending too much time setting up my personal COVID Jabbatorium QR code on my stupid almost smart phone I found that our local village jabbatorium wasn't set up for that kind of thing.  After all that effort I felt robbed.  I was cheered up a bit though after being given my jab by being given a nice cup of tea.

I enjoyed my walk back home, but as you can expect I was curled up asleep under my duvet within minutes of arriving back home.

 

I'm feeling reasonably alright at present with just a mild tender spot on my arm, but I suppose I'm going to feel more fatigued & etc later on.  I now have an official type card that will get signed off when I get my second jab which apparently will make things easier should I be utterly foolish enough as to leave NZ and go overseas.  I did express the opinion that it will be at least five years before anywhere in the world is safe enough to visit and nobody seem to want to contradict me.

 

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