Jump to content

Danemouth - a Seaside BLT


Recommended Posts

Hi nice layout looks spacious can I ask where you got those clip on spot lights they look ideal for my micro layout.

 

Cheers

 

I bought some in IKEA but they no longer have them, the most recent ones came from Amazon

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01I5DALSE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

However I did get caught out - the bulbs were daylight colour temperature whereas the IKEA ones were warmer - had to change the bulbs in the Amazon lights to these (I prefer the warmer look, Danemouth in set in Summer)

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01KHILJ5O/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Hope  this helps,

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Just finished the wiring on Danemouth and will be powering it up  shortly.

 

The lighting mentioned in previous posts proved very useful whilst the layout was in its back

 

post-7048-0-89951000-1530534451_thumb.jpg

 

The station throat

 

post-7048-0-23795100-1530534469_thumb.jpg

 

and beneath the release crossover

 

post-7048-0-05265100-1530534460_thumb.jpg

 

On all three boards I've used DCC Concepts busbars for the track wiring - saw them in another thread and bought three sets. It was much easier than the plethora of chocolate box connectors previously used.

 

Finally the control panel, please remember the points are DCC and operated via my Powercab

 

post-7048-0-04282800-1530534477_thumb.jpg

 

The black panel is for the Powercab. te three switches are L to R

 

  • Track Power bus
  • programming track - the headshunt, and
  • points bus

In normal operation all three are on.

 

The terminals are connected across the output of the Powercab Panel so that I can plug my Hornby Rolling Road in.

 

Regards to you all,

 

Dave

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the testing of the wiring is almost complete and not without opportunities for harnessing my diagnostic skills:

  • Layout powered up without any short circuits,
  • Had to adjust the Cobalt motors on several points and swap one out - all the motors are nine years old and have been used on each incarnation of Danemouth,
  • One of the point decoders failed - lucky it was a four point decoder with only three in use!
  • The point frogs on the main boards were all dead. I have two frog juicers again from days gone by - one was extremely hot and doing sweet FA. So I replaced it with the one from the fiddleyard and rewired the latter to switch frogs via the Cobalt points aux switches.
  • Found a short length of track between the bay points hadn't been wired,
  • Programmed the route macros into the Powercab - more about that tomorrow.
  • Some time ago I swapped the Powercab "Straight" wire for a six core 3 metre curly one from DCC Supplies - managed to step on the plug and break it - replacement lead ordered today.

I still have some locos stalling on the double slip - will investigate tomorrow,

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Well the testing of the wiring is almost complete and not without opportunities for harnessing my diagnostic skills:

  • Layout powered up without any short circuits,
  • Had to adjust the Cobalt motors on several points and swap one out - all the motors are nine years old and have been used on each incarnation of Danemouth,
  • One of the point decoders failed - lucky it was a four point decoder with only three in use!
  • The point frogs on the main boards were all dead. I have two frog juicers again from days gone by - one was extremely hot and doing sweet FA. So I replaced it with the one from the fiddleyard and rewired the latter to switch frogs via the Cobalt points aux switches.
  • Found a short length of track between the bay points hadn't been wired,
  • Programmed the route macros into the Powercab - more about that tomorrow.
  • Some time ago I swapped the Powercab "Straight" wire for a six core 3 metre curly one from DCC Supplies - managed to step on the plug and break it - replacement lead ordered today.

I still have some locos stalling on the double slip - will investigate tomorrow,

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

Blimey!!!.................I would love to say I understood that..........................................................but I didn't. Not a jot.

 

 

Rob.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Blimey!!!.................I would love to say I understood that..........................................................but I didn't. Not a jot.

 

 

Rob.

 

Basic translation "It lives!"

 

Now for lots of playing trains/in depth testing.

 

Nik

Link to post
Share on other sites

Basic translation "It lives!"

 

Now for lots of playing trains/in depth testing.

 

Nik

 

Absolutely correct, I shall now spend several days testing operations - lets face it it's far easier to alter things now before track is ballasted and scenery starts to appear!

 

I thought I should describe the operation of points/turnouts. The pictures back in Post #131 show one of the point decoders, I've used them since Danemouth Mk 1 back in 2010. I find changing the points via the Powercab handset straightforward no matter where I am standing in front of the layout - the Powercab has the six wire DCC Supplies 3 metre curly lead seen here

 

Whilst there are eleven points (including fiddleyard) there are only nine decoders used - the two points in the release crossover are wired to the same decoder as they always change as a pair. The two points for the bay platform and siding are also wired to a single decoder - they too change together.

 

A point can be changed on the Powercab by pressing the Accessory key, entering the point number, press enter and then 1 for normal or 2 for reversed - I found this long-winded and opted for a different approach.

 

The Powercab can store 16 macros with each containing up to 8 points, including whether they are to be set normal or reversed. This version of Danemouth uses 13 macros listed in a diagram which I mount above the layout

 

Danemouth Operating Diagram.pdf

 

So lets say I want to run the B Set from the top fiddleyard road into the main platform:

  • Press Macro , then 12 and enter, followed by
  • Macro, 1 and enter - job done!

Macro 1 not only sets the two points in the station throat it also sets the release crossover to "normal", the point in the bay to face the siding in case of a runaway in the bay platform and also sets the double slip so that a runaway in either the run around loop or sidings is directed into the headshunt thus protecting the running lines.

 

I don't recall anybody describing the use of macros and thought it might be helpful to document it here.

 

Incidentally I did consider the Cobalt point levers this time but decided to stay with decoders.

 

The loco roster

 

danemouth Loco List.pdf

 

The S shows locos that have sound fitted.

 

Well, back to playing trains testing,

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely correct, I shall now spend several days testing operations - lets face it it's far easier to alter things now before track is ballasted and scenery starts to appear!

 

I thought I should describe the operation of points/turnouts. The pictures back in Post #131 show one of the point decoders, I've used them since Danemouth Mk 1 back in 2010. I find changing the points via the Powercab handset straightforward no matter where I am standing in front of the layout - the Powercab has the six wire DCC Supplies 3 metre curly lead seen here

 

Whilst there are eleven points (including fiddleyard) there are only nine decoders used - the two points in the release crossover are wired to the same decoder as they always change as a pair. The two points for the bay platform and siding are also wired to a single decoder - they too change together.

 

A point can be changed on the Powercab by pressing the Accessory key, entering the point number, press enter and then 1 for normal or 2 for reversed - I found this long-winded and opted for a different approach.

 

The Powercab can store 16 macros with each containing up to 8 points, including whether they are to be set normal or reversed. This version of Danemouth uses 13 macros listed in a diagram which I mount above the layout

 

attachicon.gifDanemouth Operating Diagram.pdf

 

So lets say I want to run the B Set from the top fiddleyard road into the main platform:

  • Press Macro , then 12 and enter, followed by
  • Macro, 1 and enter - job done!

Macro 1 not only sets the two points in the station throat it also sets the release crossover to "normal", the point in the bay to face the siding in case of a runaway in the bay platform and also sets the double slip so that a runaway in either the run around loop or sidings is directed into the headshunt thus protecting the running lines.

 

I don't recall anybody describing the use of macros and thought it might be helpful to document it here.

 

Incidentally I did consider the Cobalt point levers this time but decided to stay with decoders.

 

The loco roster

 

attachicon.gifdanemouth Loco List.pdf

 

The S shows locos that have sound fitted.

 

Well, back to playing trains testing,

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

Good work Dave. I too use macros, for route setting in the storage loops, using an NCE Mini Panel to activate them from push buttons on the control panel. Of course, this doesn't offer the walk-around capability that you have. Lots of ways to kill a cat (figure of speech - no felines were harmed during the building of my layout).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I've said some extremely rude words today.

 

I've been testing the layout off and on for the past few days. Yesterday the Panniers started stalling on one side of the double slip so this afternoon out came the multimeter and I check the continuity of all four wires on it. No breaks found and the two frog wires were properly connected to the juicer.

 

You may remember back in Post #133 me saying that one of the two frog juicers had failed and that I rewired the frogs in the fiddleyard to be switched by the Cobalts transferring the juicer to the main board.

 

Well it seems one of the six channels on this juicer has also failed so I thought buqqer it - I've spent the past couple of hours scrapping the juicer and having all points on the layout switched by the auxiliary switches on the Cobalt motors.

 

Thorough testing resumes tomorrow.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Progress continues; because of my clumsiness my friends John & Paul offered to cut the tracks, seven in all, across the two baseboard joints. They did that for me last night first pinning and soldering each rail and then using a slitting disc to cut the track.

 

So I power up the layout afterwards and two dry joints are revealed together with one dropper that had no power on it. The dry joints were easy to fix, the dropper caused some mild swearing. It seems that altering the wiring last week I accidentally cut a wire when removing cable ties. This was soon remedied today and I once again have a fully powered layout so operational testing can resume.

 

Off to my granddaughter's school concert now so I will post some photos tomorrow.

 

Dave

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, operational testing continues and with one exception I am very pleased with the layout. The one exception? the fiddleyard:

 

post-7048-0-96264100-1531920482_thumb.jpg

 

As you can see it's a lot more cramped than I originally envisaged. But all is not lost - a friend of mine has very kindly offered to make me a traverser board over the next few months, The existing board is 120 by 60 cm. - the new board will be 140 by 60 cm which will gain me ~ 30 cm in the train length and a bit more in the scenic section and of course gets rid of three points.

 

In the fiddleyard the picture shows the typical trains, from L to R

  • Two corridor coaches off an express detached at the junction. Shown here with a Class 22 but could be a Dukedog, 43xx, Grange, Warship or Hymek. I also have B & C and Chocolate/Cream coaches available
  • B Set shown with a Pannier but could also be a Prairie (Large or small) Class 22 etc
  • Autocoach with a 4575 or 64xx
  • Goods train

Also available but not shown include a B & C Flying Banana and Class 121 together with some NPCS vans.

 

Here's the station

 

post-7048-0-22171000-1531920471_thumb.jpg

 

and with the Auto Train and B Set

 

post-7048-0-27350500-1531920512_thumb.jpg

 

post-7048-0-73877700-1531920521_thumb.jpg

 

and finally for Rob NHY581 harking back to Post #21 parked in the spur off the bay is a Syphon

 

post-7048-0-13114100-1531920457_thumb.jpg

 

I will shortly start the next bit which is:

  • Paint the sleepers with sleeper grime,
  • Rail sides with rusty rails
  • The baseboard with Chalkboard paint to act as ground cover - a tip from and friend of mine, followed by
  • Constructing the platform and the bridge for the scenic break.

Regards,

 

Dave

 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, operational testing continues and with one exception I am very pleased with the layout. The one exception? the fiddleyard:

 

DSC16611.jpg

 

As you can see it's a lot more cramped than I originally envisaged. But all is not lost - a friend of mine has very kindly offered to make me a traverser board over the next few months, The existing board is 120 by 60 cm. - the new board will be 140 by 60 cm which will gain me ~ 30 cm in the train length and a bit more in the scenic section and of course gets rid of three points.

 

In the fiddleyard the picture shows the typical trains, from L to R

  • Two corridor coaches off an express detached at the junction. Shown here with a Class 22 but could be a Dukedog, 43xx, Grange, Warship or Hymek. I also have B & C and Chocolate/Cream coaches available
  • B Set shown with a Pannier but could also be a Prairie (Large or small) Class 22 etc
  • Autocoach with a 4575 or 64xx
  • Goods train
Also available but not shown include a B & C Flying Banana and Class 121 together with some NPCS vans.

 

Here's the station

 

DSC16608.jpg

 

and with the Auto Train and B Set

 

DSC16612.jpg

 

DSC16614.jpg

 

and finally for Rob NHY581 harking back to Post #21 parked in the spur off the bay is a Syphon

 

DSC16607.jpg

 

I will shortly start the next bit which is:

  • Paint the sleepers with sleeper grime,
  • Rail sides with rusty rails
  • The baseboard with Chalkboard paint to act as ground cover - a tip from and friend of mine, followed by
  • Constructing the platform and the bridge for the scenic break.
Regards,

 

Dave

I have never heard of using chalkboard paint like this - what are the advantages?
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never heard of using chalkboard paint like this - what are the advantages?

 

Used to be called Blackboard paint. Gives a nice flat back finish to which ballast, ash etc. can easily be glued,

 

Regards,

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cramped, that's not cramped :) But I do agree a traverser does make better use of the space. It does mean you need to be up that end of the layout to move it about between train movements, I like being up the station end and just using macros to select each road in the fiddle yard. 

 

I do like your testing plan though, very good, very thorough. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cramped, that's not cramped :) But I do agree a traverser does make better use of the space. It does mean you need to be up that end of the layout to move it about between train movements, I like being up the station end and just using macros to select each road in the fiddle yard. 

 

I do like your testing plan though, very good, very thorough. 

 

Scot

 

As it happens my chair (a bar stool) is at the fiddleyard end which is where I tend to operate the layout from. At the moment I have to get off it and wander down the layout to uncouple stock. I will eventually look at remote uncoupling but that is right down the bottom of the list of things to do!

 

Incidentally the layout is almost 46 inches off the floor.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

In what sense do you feel the fiddle yard is cramped?

 

Not enough lines? Lines too short? Lines too close together?

 

I ask because a traverser has pros and cons and there might be a simpler solution, depending on the nature of the "cramping". ;-)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Coming along nicely, DM, but a sector plate type fiddle is clearly an advantage.  Don't make the mistake of putting the roads too close together, even if it means losing one; you must be able to get your fingers in between rakes in order to lift them out, what we used to call crane shunting back in the day (yeah, that dates me...).  But a sector plate/traverser type will pivot, and the roads will naturally fan out to give you room.  An alternative might be a cassette system, depending on how much handling of cassettes you are happy with; they can double as display modules for your trains.

 

I use a swivelling office chair to operate from, and it runs freely up and down from end to end of the layout even with Johnster's 16 plus stone on it; this process has become so natural that I do not even consciously think about it, and the chair just takes me where I want to be.  I use a handheld Gaugemaster which has enough cable to permit this; I am very happy with the operating setup and the height of my layout, 30"/72cm.  I'd like it to have been a little higher, but not by much, and this is convenient for boards sitting on tables and chests of drawers in a rented flat where we cannot permanently fix anything to the walls.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In what sense do you feel the fiddle yard is cramped?

 

Not enough lines? Lines too short? Lines too close together?

 

I ask because a traverser has pros and cons and there might be a simpler solution, depending on the nature of the "cramping". ;-)

 

Phil,

 

More than anything the lines are  too short - the traverser will add 30 cm minimum to each line. Danemouth Mk 1 had a sector plate which I liked but the traverser, which will only be about 40 cm deep seems the best bet for me.

 

Regards,

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Coming along nicely, DM, but a sector plate type fiddle is clearly an advantage.  Don't make the mistake of putting the roads too close together, even if it means losing one; you must be able to get your fingers in between rakes in order to lift them out, what we used to call crane shunting back in the day (yeah, that dates me...).  But a sector plate/traverser type will pivot, and the roads will naturally fan out to give you room.  An alternative might be a cassette system, depending on how much handling of cassettes you are happy with; they can double as display modules for your trains.

 

I use a swivelling office chair to operate from, and it runs freely up and down from end to end of the layout even with Johnster's 16 plus stone on it; this process has become so natural that I do not even consciously think about it, and the chair just takes me where I want to be.  I use a handheld Gaugemaster which has enough cable to permit this; I am very happy with the operating setup and the height of my layout, 30"/72cm.  I'd like it to have been a little higher, but not by much, and this is convenient for boards sitting on tables and chests of drawers in a rented flat where we cannot permanently fix anything to the walls.

 

John,

 

The Powercab has a 3 metre DCC Supplies curly cable which means I can wander up and down the whole layout and change points with it as I go.

 

At 46 inches high it has to be a bar stool - I could lower the trestles but there is a ton of junk boxes, mostly not mine stored under the layout.

 

Experience with the sector plate made me aware of having a suitable gap between the tracks,

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Phil,

 

More than anything the lines are  too short - the traverser will add 30 cm minimum to each line. Danemouth Mk 1 had a sector plate which I liked but the traverser, which will only be about 40 cm deep seems the best bet for me.

 

Regards,

 

Dave

Fair enough.

 

Note that unlike your current design where you can be reasonably sure that shunting operations have not left any stock in the headshunt you will need to align an empty traverser road with your headshunt before you use it.

 

If you were designing with a traverser in mind from the start you would probably do things slightly differently: Space the main line and the headshunt so that both can be connected to the traverser at the same time (while the roads are more widely space as the Johnster says) and bring them further to the front of the baseboard so that you have more travel and thus space for more traverser roads.

Edited by Harlequin
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.