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TurboSnail's Workbench - 3D Printing and General Bodgery

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The 20 mm diameter tube would be a bit gross for a small engine, unless you thought of doing a fireless one?

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

The 20 mm diameter tube would be a bit gross for a small engine, unless you thought of doing a fireless one?

 

That's what I thought, but then I also thought that 15mm might be a bit too small... I don't want to buy anything else for this project, so it would have to be one of the two, or hacking up one of the loco bodies. Or find another common household item that could substitute.

Edited by TurboSnail

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10 minutes ago, TurboSnail said:

 

That's what I thought, but then I also thought that 15mm might be a bit too small... I don't want to buy anything else for this project, so it would have to be one of the two, or hacking up one of the loco bodies. Or find another common household item that could substitute.

Hi TS,

 

If you use the 15mm tube you can increase it's diameter by splitting another piece of tube and sliding it over the original piece, the increase in diameter being twice wall thickness. To make the diameter greater still you can sandwich a wrapping of thin plasticard (.010") , twice wall thickness plus twice plasticard thickness, more plasticard greater still. The elasticity of the tube will keep it all together while the glue cures, although a bit of tape will make sure, and it may then be treated as a thick tube.

 

Its a tricky job but it does work.

 

Gibbo.

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1 hour ago, Gibbo675 said:

Hi TS,

 

If you use the 15mm tube you can increase it's diameter by splitting another piece of tube and sliding it over the original piece, the increase in diameter being twice wall thickness. To make the diameter greater still you can sandwich a wrapping of thin plasticard (.010") , twice wall thickness plus twice plasticard thickness, more plasticard greater still. The elasticity of the tube will keep it all together while the glue cures, although a bit of tape will make sure, and it may then be treated as a thick tube.

 

Its a tricky job but it does work.

 

Gibbo.

 

With the plasticard strapped down with tape. plunge in a mug of just off boiling water for a few minutes. Then the plasticard will hold its shape.

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The fruits of last night's labour - the SECR Manning Wardle 313 is starting to take shape, the motor even fits, which was what I was most worried about. I also finished painting the Neilson 2-2-2T and adding the final few details, just waiting for nameplates and a driver now. Then maybe I can finally reclaim some bench space for something else!

 

image.png.e74eb2dd46b3cafc3dd705615b7a8031.png

 

image.png.300de4f826132336c580b5cdac6969b9.png

 

Also, I'm now up to 500 posts! :dancing:

Edited by TurboSnail
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5 minutes ago, Guy Rixon said:

Must try that one one the CSB advocates. It will make their spreadsheets more interesting.

Hi Guy,

 

Forgive my ignorance, what is CSB ?

 

Gibbo.

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CSB = Continuous Spring Beams. Guitar-wire springs are run the length of the chassis, one on each side, and bearing on all the axles. There's a pivot point, typically, on each side of each wheel, with some pivots serving a wheel on either side. This allows all the wheels to be sprung and the weight on each axle can be set by moving the pivot points. The behaviour of the CSBs is predictable enough that there exist spreadsheets to say where to put the pivots for a given wheel arrangement and centre of balance. The balance of the loco can be designed in when building the chassis; c.f. individual springs on each wheels where the balance usually has to be got by adjustment (profanity-limited) after building.

 

Actually, on second reading, the Belgian 0-6-oops-0 is just an 0-8-0 for CSB purposes and not that interesting. 

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13 hours ago, Gibbo675 said:

Hi Guy,

 

Forgive my ignorance, what is CSB ?

 

Gibbo.

It's something used by some "finescale" modellers in building model locomotives and is supposedly the "cutting edge of technology", although it makes the locomotive run/stay on the track, no better than one that uses simple compensation. It's the next big argument to kick off in the P4 world and will make the gauge wars look like a teddy bears picnic, or so I am told... :rolleyes:

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The history of Protofour seems at times to have resembled that of the Judean Peoples Front, or was that the People's Front of Judea?

 

Splitters! 

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I know James, - I got out alive and fled to the delights of coarse scale 'O' Gauge, - and I never looked back once.

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42 minutes ago, Ruston said:

It's something used by some "finescale" modellers in building model locomotives and is supposedly the "cutting edge of technology", although it makes the locomotive run/stay on the track, no better than one that uses simple compensation. It's the next big argument to kick off in the P4 world and will make the gauge wars look like a teddy bears picnic, or so I am told... https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_rolleyes.gif

 

You were mis-told...

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"Whatever happened to the Judean Popular Peoples' Front?"
"He's over there..."
[in chorus]: "SPLITTER!"

*ahem*

That Neilson's gorgeous - I may have to acquire one at some point! I am also fighting the urge to go for one of the Manning Wardles too, but really can't justify it appearing deep in LSWR territory!

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1 hour ago, Ruston said:

It's something used by some "finescale" modellers in building model locomotives and is supposedly the "cutting edge of technology", although it makes the locomotive run/stay on the track, no better than one that uses simple compensation. It's the next big argument to kick off in the P4 world and will make the gauge wars look like a teddy bears picnic, or so I am told... https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_rolleyes.gif

One could of course go to the forum of the S4 society and actually read the posts concerning the value of CSBs. There was much debate, because they are an interesting technology. There was no war, hardly even a heated argument.

 

The lasting desire to smear P4 modellers sickens me.

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23 minutes ago, Guy Rixon said:

One could of course go to the forum of the S4 society and actually read the posts concerning the value of CSBs. There was much debate, because they are an interesting technology. There was no war, hardly even a heated argument.

 

The lasting desire to smear P4 modellers sickens me.

 

Lest I be smeared as a smearer, my only real insight into this subculture was as a nonplussed witness to some pretty heated correspondence in old copies of MRJ that I once came across.  

 

The propensity to be opinionated and pedantic afflicts this hobby generally, though one might be forgiven for the impression that the risk increases the nearer to perfection one strives!

 

Generally I suspect that the finescale community bears significant responsibility for how it is perceived.  I am inspired and influenced by Iain Rice's writing, but I suspect that is because he is one of the few able to translate from finescale culture to something more accessible and demotic. 

 

Moving back towards the topic, a package arrived today at Aching Towers: https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/130022-secr-traffic-on-the-tonbridge-cut-off/&do=findComment&comment=3465380

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I see that the walls on the tender print are translucent where they are exposed in front of the coal space. I wonder, how thin are these parts?

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I have nothing against finescale modellers since I used to be one.  Possibly it was the group I was involved with, but eventually I just had to leave for the sake on my own sanity.  Opinionated and pedantic, - those guys had it by the barrow load.  It wasn't just me, shortly after I left the group the group leader's wife left him because he was such an A grade XXXXXXX so yes it was pretty awful.

I used to make things like 19th century 0-4-0 Manning Wardles in brass in P4 (not a kit all hand made), - lovely little jewels of things.

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4 minutes ago, Annie said:

I used to make things like 19th century 0-4-0 Manning Wardles in brass in P4 (not a kit all hand made), - lovely little jewels of things.

That sounds very nice. Do you have photos you could post somewhere?

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Sorry Guy I never owned a camera back then and I ended up having to sell all my models when life happened and I needed the money.

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13 minutes ago, Guy Rixon said:

I see that the walls on the tender print are translucent where they are exposed in front of the coal space. I wonder, how thin are these parts?

 

Very thin! I use a minimum wall thickness of 0.75mm for small areas, and for larger flat surfaces like this tender, it's 1mm. I've done a fair bit of experimentation and thinner walls are possible, but I prefer to keep it to 1mm (or more) where possible so that they print reliably every time.

Edited by TurboSnail
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12 minutes ago, Guy Rixon said:

I see that the walls on the tender print are translucent where they are exposed in front of the coal space. I wonder, how thin are these parts?

 

Do these pictures help at all?

 

 

DSCN8284.JPG

DSCN8285.JPG

DSCN8286.JPG

DSCN8288.JPG

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1 hour ago, Edwardian said:

Generally I suspect that the finescale community bears significant responsibility for how it is perceived.  I am inspired and influenced by Iain Rice's writing, but I suspect that is because he is one of the few able to translate from finescale culture to something more accessible and demotic. 

 

With due respect to my learned friend, I must speak in defence of the 2fs community who have a reputation for being encouraging, accepting and tolerant of all.  In over 40 years membership I have never seen any heated discussions or falling out. 

 

Jim 

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Just now, Caley Jim said:

With due respect to my learned friend, I must speak in defence of the 2fs community who have a reputation for being encouraging, accepting and tolerant of all.  In over 40 years membership I have never seen any heated discussions or falling out. 

 

Jim 

 

That seems an entirely fair corrective, Jim, and I apologise for typing with my 4mm blinkers on.  I don't have to take your word for it either, though I'd be happy to; anecdotally online and at exhibitions I have found 2Fessers consistently friendly.

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5 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

 

Do these pictures help at all?

 

 

That's a heck of a macro lens if you can actually see the print lines. Each of those lines is 25 microns wide...

Edited by TurboSnail
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