Jump to content

TrevorP1

Grampound Road. Salad Days on the Cornish Main Line

Recommended Posts

Thanks to a very understanding wife who has allowed me to forget that the bathroom door needs painting I've been able to make some cracking progress this weekend. The basic framework is around three sides of the room now. There is a minor amount of 'snagging' to do but overall I'm farther ahead than I dared hope. I'm also somewhat amazed that it's all level as well! The old set of drawers will be used for loco storage.

 

Next come the fiddly bits by the door to which the lifting section attaches.

 

post-14258-0-03195600-1547398276_thumb.jpeg

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting back to normal now after a horrendous week which saw Carol suddenly admitted to  hospital. She came out on Friday but I think if they hadn't let her out 'officially' she would have climbed out of the window! Still some recuperating to be done but everything is on the up. A sudden situation like that makes you think about what really matters...

 

With her blessing I've managed to get more baseboard work done today. Those on the right of the photo are at the down end of the fiddle yard. Right background is the main line on a slight incline up from the fiddle yard and the 'gap' is where the down sidings will be - on a slight embankment to make them level. The ground this side of the sidings will slope down to towards the viewer. On the left is the where pointwork at the London end of the station is located. I'm intending to make this section removable during the construction phase so that point motor installation and wiring is much easier.

 

I'm having to take a few liberties to make the location fit my site and now and again I wonder whether I could rightly call the station 'Grampound Road'. I recently came across an old Railway Modeller with David Jenkinson's article about his layout Garsdale Road and how for similar reasons he chose this name rather than Dent on which the model was based. Plenty of time to ponder this but I came up with Ladock Road (Ladock is a similar distance from the station as Grampound), Trenowth Road or my favourite St. Stephens Road. Funny how we spend time thinking about the least important part!

 

post-14258-0-36481100-1548010009_thumb.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<<<<<<<<<<< Funny how we spend time thinking about the least important part!>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

 

The more you think about it, the more important it becomes.  I've turned some minor detail into a feature that shows up well on the layout.

 

Brian.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like "St Stephen's Road", as a layout name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting back to normal now after a horrendous week which saw Carol suddenly admitted to  hospital. She came out on Friday but I think if they hadn't let her out 'officially' she would have climbed out of the window! Still some recuperating to be done but everything is on the up. A sudden situation like that makes you think about what really matters...

 

With her blessing I've managed to get more baseboard work done today. Those on the right of the photo are at the down end of the fiddle yard. Right background is the main line on a slight incline up from the fiddle yard and the 'gap' is where the down sidings will be - on a slight embankment to make them level. The ground this side of the sidings will slope down to towards the viewer. On the left is the where pointwork at the London end of the station is located. I'm intending to make this section removable during the construction phase so that point motor installation and wiring is much easier.

 

I'm having to take a few liberties to make the location fit my site and now and again I wonder whether I could rightly call the station 'Grampound Road'. I recently came across an old Railway Modeller with David Jenkinson's article about his layout Garsdale Road and how for similar reasons he chose this name rather than Dent on which the model was based. Plenty of time to ponder this but I came up with Ladock Road (Ladock is a similar distance from the station as Grampound), Trenowth Road or my favourite St. Stephens Road. Funny how we spend time thinking about the least important part!

 

attachicon.giffullsizeoutput_1df1.jpeg

 

I like "St Stephen's Road", as a layout name.

Trevor, I like Ladock Road.

 

Way back on page 3 of the Mid-Cornwall Lines topic there was a little digression regarding a fictitious branch down the Roseland Peninsular to St Mawes:

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/94350-mid-cornwall-lines-1950s-western-region-in-00/page-3&do=findComment&comment=1799195

 

That might help with your thought processes.

 

Hope all goes well for Carol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trevor, I like Ladock Road.

 

Way back on page 3 of the Mid-Cornwall Lines topic there was a little digression regarding a fictitious branch down the Roseland Peninsular to St Mawes:

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/94350-mid-cornwall-lines-1950s-western-region-in-00/page-3&do=findComment&comment=1799195

 

That might help with your thought processes.

 

Hope all goes well for Carol.

 

 

Thank you for the good wishes John. We've been out today today doing PR work on part of the route for The Tour of Cheshire classic car rally. Fresh air and something to occupy the mind whilst off work.

 

St Stephen Road (not St Stephen's - my mistake) has a certain ring, plus one of our favourite holiday spots is at Crugwallins which is near St Stephen. However, I also like Ladock Road which Grampound Road could equally have been in real life. If  I change I'll plump for one of these but for now it's a pleasant distraction.

 

Incidentally. Trenowth or Trenoweth? I've seen both on maps and John you call it Trenoweth. Has the pronunciation/spelling got lazy over time? Reminds me of some of the Welsh place names around here. The locals faithfully pronounce some of them the 'Welsh' way and then others are spoken as if by an Englishman with no idea of Welsh pronunciation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the good wishes John. We've been out today today doing PR work on part of the route for The Tour of Cheshire classic car rally. Fresh air and something to occupy the mind whilst off work.

 

St Stephen Road (not St Stephen's - my mistake) has a certain ring, plus one of our favourite holiday spots is at Crugwallins which is near St Stephen. However, I also like Ladock Road which Grampound Road could equally have been in real life. If  I change I'll plump for one of these but for now it's a pleasant distraction.

 

Incidentally. Trenowth or Trenoweth? I've seen both on maps and John you call it Trenoweth. Has the pronunciation/spelling got lazy over time? Reminds me of some of the Welsh place names around here. The locals faithfully pronounce some of them the 'Welsh' way and then others are spoken as if by an Englishman with no idea of Welsh pronunciation. 

Dunno Trevor. I took Trenoweth from an old road atlas, probably dating from the fifties. Spellings do change from time to time - dare I say, more so in the Celtic regions of the country than further East?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dunno Trevor. I took Trenoweth from an old road atlas, probably dating from the fifties. Spellings do change from time to time - dare I say, more so in the Celtic regions of the country than further East?

 

The spellings of place names probably tend to have changed more in the Celtic regions of the country as they were originally in the local Celtic language.  When this ceases to be in everyday use, being replaced by English, the meaning of the names gets forgotten and they change/become corrupted over time.  Trenowth is a good example of such a name in Cornwall, it would have originally been Trenoweth.  Tre means a settlement such as a farmstead or village so Trenoweth is "New Village".

 

Oll an gwella (All the best)

 

John

Edited by janner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The spellings of place names probably tend to have changed more in the Celtic regions of the country as they were originally in the local Celtic language.  When this ceases to be in everyday use, being replaced by English, the meaning of the names gets forgotten and they change/become corrupted over time.  Trenowth is a good example of such a name in Cornwall, it would have originally been Trenoweth.  Tre means a settlement such as a farmstead or village so Trenoweth is "New Village".

 

Oll an gwella (All the best)

 

John

That’s interesting John, thank you. Now that you’ve explained, ‘noweth’ is of course similar to ‘newydd’ in Welsh. All of which has dangerously got my little brain going... I know that ‘Grampound’ is a corruption of ‘Grand Pont’ from Norman times but what about ‘Ladock’ or come to that ‘Probus’? According to Wikipedia, Ladock comes from St Ladoca and there is a parish church of that name. There seems to have been a Roman Emperor called Probus... As usual more questions than answers. Perhaps I should get on with the carpentry!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After the up and downs of the last couple of weeks, today it was nice to place a few bits of track around the place to see if things are likely to work out. I think they will... :) It doesn't look much but 90% of the main baseboard work is complete. The main item left is the lifting section.

 

By rough measurement there will be 18 -19 feet of scenic section with the sharper - 3 feet minimum radius -  curves at the the ends partly disguised by landscaping.

 

Once the boards are complete the general aim is temporarily lay a complete 'oval' with code 100 (which will see later use in the fiddle yard) to check performance on the short gradients at each end. By my arithmetic they are no more than 1 in 90. I'm confident the diesels will be fine. If the steam can handle 6 or max 7 I'll be happy.

 

post-14258-0-49928800-1548614175_thumb.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Agree 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed that is a good film! The idea of being able to lay on extra wagons and locos prob something we will not see nowadays :(

 

Good start to the layout!

 

Well worth the effort Ade. Some interesting modelling spaces there! I followed the link for the tool to open up RTR axle boxes for 2mm bearings - very handy!

 

When you look at it, Airfix were remarkable for their day and I'm pleased to be able to incorporate something of theirs in my efforts.

 

I've just found the link to the film I mentioned earlier. It's called Train Time and deals with how various BR areas worked together to get the job done. At one point it mentions 12 broccoli (cauliflower) specials in one day and it seems they were able to send 3 light engines from Bath to Cornwall to help out. How times change. Later in the film there is a glimpse of a train from above showing cases of broccoli loaded into 5 plank open wagons. Now that would make for an interesting model project...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zj_wS9jfuj4

 

At risk of becoming obsessed, with 10 minutes to spare I peered at a few 1950s photos of these trains. I am for sure not an expert but out of a total of 56 cattle wagons that I could identify there were 12 GW, 19 BR, 7 LNER, 13 LMS and 5 SR. Interestingly the ones served best RTR are the least common.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A quick update - as much to play with the new system as anything else. The lifting flap is now in position and working although it needs finishing off. When I've done that the next job will be to lay a temporary single line to check that trains can handle the small gradients - I think and hope so but I want to be sure.

No more progress for at least a couple of days - 6 Nations Rugby in a few minutes and Stafford show for an inspiration fix tomorrow.

IMG_5223.jpeg.a4f014ca3a82e474f54199f2da8445d7.jpeg

  • Like 6
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope you got your inspiration fix. I certainly did: it was a good show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, TrevorP1 said:

A quick update - as much to play with the new system as anything else. The lifting flap is now in position and working although it needs finishing off. When I've done that the next job will be to lay a temporary single line to check that trains can handle the small gradients - I think and hope so but I want to be sure.

No more progress for at least a couple of days - 6 Nations Rugby in a few minutes and Stafford show for an inspiration fix tomorrow.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_02/IMG_5223.jpeg.a4f014ca3a82e474f54199f2da8445d7.jpeg

Trevor, two things come to mind after seeing that photo.

 

1. What are you doing for blinds? Not so much for security but to stop the light bleaching out all the colours on the layout.

 

2. I'm worried that the lifting flap frame will foul the fixed board when it is raised. Draw an arc from the hinge pin and cut the framing back to that line.

 

Trains running soon!

  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just found your thread. That's a really nice building and I'm liking the track plan a lot, very good. Looking forward to seeing trains running! 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Trevor, two things come to mind after seeing that photo.

 

1. What are you doing for blinds? Not so much for security but to stop the light bleaching out all the colours on the layout.

 

2. I'm worried that the lifting flap frame will foul the fixed board when it is raised. Draw an arc from the hinge pin and cut the framing back to that line.

 

Trains running soon!

 

Thank you for the general encouragement folks. I'm going to need plenty as the months roll by! 

 

John. There will be blinds before there is anything damageable. In some ways I'm a little bit ahead of myself. Thanks to being able to get power in much sooner than anticipated  I started on the baseboards. Owing to the weather, all of the cutting has been inside which of course makes a big mess. Therefore I've cracked on as much as possible so that this is over and done with. The 'closing' side of the lifting flap is far from finished, in fact only the bearers are in position.  Thanks for the comment though, I'll bear it in mind when I carry on.

 

Went over to the Stafford show with a railwayman pal today. There were 3 or 4 layouts which appealed but I have to say that for me, Arun Quay stole the show. David Wright's model building work was also very impressive, so much so that I bought the book!

  • Like 2
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6938 Corndean Hall heads through Grampound Road with the up Cornishman.

 

Trains have run! As planned - there's a first - using a few pieces of double sided tape I put down a temporary loop of code 75 flat bottom (destined for the fiddle yard) to check how trains would cope with the gradients. I'm pleased to say the results were better than I hoped. Having put together a 10 coach rake resembling the weekday Cornishman I tried a Bachmann NBL Warship first. Panther didn't appear to even notice it had a train behind and even managed to creep round the entire circuit on 'notch 1'. Next I tried the Bachmann Hall, which for some reason has a really heavy tender, and to my great pleasure it too romped round. Both locos also started away with the train on the gradient having the 3' radius curve.

 

Trains will normally be proportionally reduced but I wanted to make the trial as hard as possible. I'm minded to continue playing  testing tomorrow to see what the other locos are capable of. For obvious reasons I'm interested in how a Hornby Grange will go and also a Bachmann small prairie because one of the trains I'd like to replicate is the 19:00 St Ives to Par which ran with a rake of non-corridor stock hauled by a St Blazey 45XX.

 

Another thing the test confirmed is that tension locks of any form will have to go. I'd already decided this but the amount of slack and 'bobbing about' of the coaches cast aside any doubt. I have some Roco couplings in the spares box so I may give these a trial before I dismantle the loop and get back to building the layout. 

 

A GOOD DAY, trains have run and my dentist decided there was no need for major excavations costing many hundreds of pounds!

 

IMG_5234.jpeg.5b135dcafac3fee857aa9f0fdf4172ba.jpeg

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TrevorP1 said:

6938 Corndean Hall heads through Grampound Road with the up Cornishman.

 

Trains have run! As planned - there's a first - using a few pieces of double sided tape I put down a temporary loop of code 75 flat bottom (destined for the fiddle yard) to check how trains would cope with the gradients. I'm pleased to say the results were better than I hoped. Having put together a 10 coach rake resembling the weekday Cornishman I tried a Bachmann NBL Warship first. Panther didn't appear to even notice it had a train behind and even managed to creep round the entire circuit on 'notch 1'. Next I tried the Bachmann Hall, which for some reason has a really heavy tender, and to my great pleasure it too romped round. Both locos also started away with the train on the gradient having the 3' radius curve.

 

Trains will normally be proportionally reduced but I wanted to make the trial as hard as possible. I'm minded to continue playing  testing tomorrow to see what the other locos are capable of. For obvious reasons I'm interested in how a Hornby Grange will go and also a Bachmann small prairie because one of the trains I'd like to replicate is the 19:00 St Ives to Par which ran with a rake of non-corridor stock hauled by a St Blazey 45XX.

 

Another thing the test confirmed is that tension locks of any form will have to go. I'd already decided this but the amount of slack and 'bobbing about' of the coaches cast aside any doubt. I have some Roco couplings in the spares box so I may give these a trial before I dismantle the loop and get back to building the layout. 

 

A GOOD DAY, trains have run and my dentist decided there was no need for major excavations costing many hundreds of pounds!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_02/IMG_5234.jpeg.5b135dcafac3fee857aa9f0fdf4172ba.jpeg

Good stuff Trevor. Glad my hunch on the gradients was correct.

 

Regarding couplings, I use the fixed Bachmann "Pipes", Hornby/Roco rigid couplers, home-made bar couplers or all of the above within sets according to the types of coaches involved, leaving the auto couplers for the outer ends only. Makes a big difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few days of preparation and planning on two different fronts. I'm about to start track laying with the pointwork at the down end end of the fiddle yard. To that end,  I've covered the fiddle yard area in DCC Concepts foam trackbed. It went down very well using Copydex. Some Peco code 75 points have been prepared for this area with the usual mods bonding the stock rails and closures etc. I'm not really happy with the built in dropper from the frog - the flimsy wire securely bonded and then doing a right angle bend seems a recipe for breakage and I'm wondering about putting my own in. 

 

I've knocked up a few cardboard mock ups of the grain stores in the goods yard. The curve through the station platforms, while pretty generous in model terms has to be much sharper than the real thing. This places these buildings and the up yard at a different angle. I've also got to think about the back scene in this area close to the end of the adjacent siding. A departure from real thing is called for I think. Not that I can do more than take an inspired guess at what the real thing was like... I'll post some pictures when I've stopped butchering pieces of defenceless cardboard!

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Progress on different fronts this week.  Using cardboard mock-ups, I think I've just about nailed the ideal position of the grain store buildings. Obviously there are compromises with the room available but overall I'm pretty happy. There are subtle changes in the ground level around the buildings, hence the removal of a chunk of baseboard. Where 'the hole' is the railway sits slightly above the average ground level immediately next to the buildings but then rises up to a field  behind the right hand shed. I wanted to get this right before track laying started here just in case I needed to adjust the line of the railway.

 

The goods shed is on the left and the box of screws represents the station building.

 

I'm happy with this but some serious thinking will be needed where the siding meets the back scene.  There was an end loading dock here so a permanently stationed Mogo or similar will help but it will need more than that...

 

IMG_5251.jpeg.fad53bc3d9620c55faf9ec2147a2aeeb.jpeg

 

This is the scene I'm trying to recreate. It's appeared before in this thread but for the sake of clarity here it is again.

 

Grampound_Road_07-07-1955-Warehouses.jpeg.6ac6c6f7e2e0847f6335574f78805abf.jpeg

 

Track laying has started in the fiddle yard and with that comes electrics. My learning curve is vertical!  The twisted wire is the DCC track bus with a soldered junction off to the splitter for the various droppers. This layout is needed three times along the fiddle yard side. I'm hoping to keep all of this kind of work in the outer L girder so that I can get at it easily.  It will eventually be covered with an easy to remove trim panel. Point motors will be surface mount in this area.

 

IMG_5252.jpeg.c8df8245bbf55d592e8eca461d5c6e35.jpeg

  • Like 12
  • Craftsmanship/clever 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There hasn't been a great deal of time for the railway lately because like many others in the UK time has been spent on garden duties making use of the short 'early spring'. I did however manage to get couple of jobs done for the Locomotive Department.

 

Firstly a motor swop on a Hornby Grange. Weirdly 6870 appeared to destroy it's motor whist sitting in box, or rather when I put it away 18 months ago to move house it was running OK but on trying it out the other day it was very sick, motor apparently seized. Luckily I had a spare motor from a long term Hornby County project so the spare was fitted. Whist the body was off I examined everything else and decided to condemn the wiring. With new wiring and the decoder now 'hard wired' Bodicote Grange is back on form.

 

Another job was on a used small prairie I purchased a few weeks back. Another decoder hard wiring job plus replacing a missing buffer. Must say I'm very pleased with this as the loco runs very sweetly. Plates now awaited for St Blazey's 5564.

 

The permanent way gang has been out again today but laying lengths of flexible track and soldering dropper wires, vital though these tasks are,  aren't really much to talk about!

 

  • Like 2
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like many others I have been waiting for the KMRC D60Xs to arrive and today the DPD app on the phone sprang into life. Duly delivered, they are now in the course of running in on the rollers. After that they will be put away again whilst work on the layout progresses and until such time as I can DCC fit them. My pair are 2 Ark Royals. One will become D600 Active in original condition - the Kernow D600 is blue - although by the time I get round to this I expect KMRC will have produced their own version! They are well worth the wait.

 

On the layout front progress is still being made on track work. When I've become bored with dropper wire and Copydex, activity has been centred on the basic scenery structure at the Trenowth (up) end. From measurements we took on holiday last year there is now a cardboard mock up of the accommodation bridge at Trenowth. 

 

I plan to have a couple of serious days work this week but until lunchtime today the 'civil engineers' (a local landscaping firm!) had a possession on the retaining wall and steps at the house end of the garden. The railway shed was marooned!

 

The other day I glanced at my original post on this thread. My basic ideas haven't changed and are still 'working out'. However unlike my original thoughts, I built all of the baseboard areas as I couldn't bear to put my ex Kings Cross Passenger Loco boards under the fiddle yard. They deserve better and I have an idea but they are safely stored under the layout until I am much further on with this project! The fiddle yard track layout has changed a little - basically just simplified with just the one cassette track.

 

Finally, this website:  http://www.visitoruk.com/Truro/grampound-road-C592-V20127.html states that the site of Grampound Road station was once known as 'High Lanes'. Now, if I ever do feel the need, this provides another possible alternative name for the station - 'Grampound High Lanes'?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

They may not look much but these two photos are the result of some determined effort this week. The top photo shows  the 'Trenowth' bridge area with a card mock up of the bridge itself. Although the bridge will be a replica of the real thing, the area behind - which will become a copse - is a work of fiction. The foreground will I hope be nearer to - but not the same as - the real thing. I have been working on the 'first fix' of scenery as I do not want to be reaching across completed areas of track and electrical work with all the lovely mess associated with building scenery. These corner areas are quite deep and anyone with any sense would have bought the back scene forwards - not me! I want as much of my little part of The Duchy as possible. Behind the bank I want to try to get a bit of forced perspective going on. Luckily the real bridge was built for  the broad gauge and this has been useful coping with the 3' radius curve I'm having to use here. Normal viewing height is much lower than this shot so I'm hoping it won't be too obvious.

 

IMG_5289.jpeg.72481c93947953504aac8147f4c85cb9.jpeg

 

The other side of the bridge is the entrance to the fiddle yard. I'm using Cobalt SS surface mount equipment for the turnouts here. Top job this week will be to get the crossover wired up - although track power will not be on yet. I've no experience of any of this so please wish me luck! DCC will be used for running trains with a separate 'old school' system for pointwork. 

 

My intention is to have a gradual transition from fiddle yard to scenic section at both ends so that in photographs and from some viewing angles the scenic section will seem bigger than it really is. If I settle on putting the left hand turnout controller where it is in the photo it may well disappear under a derelict barn or some such.

 

IMG_5291.jpeg.ffb613854e3d330c95945c777d58fee3.jpeg

 

 

 

 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's been a few days since the last update but I've been able to spend time on several areas making good progress. Some things don't seem much on the day and are quickly forgotten but taken together I can't be unhappy.  

 

A major milestone was passed last week when a train ran on what is now permanent trackwork. It was only in and out of part of the fiddle yard but a working train nonetheless. To achieve this some fiddle yard points have been wired up using the DCC Concepts surface mount equipment. A pair of the these have been set up to work together as a crossover. Being a bit of a twit, rather than doing a single turnout, I did the crossover first. Like many others, whilst Iiking their products, I've found DCC Concepts instructions sadly lacking and not as 'easy' to follow as they repeatedly say everything is! Nevertheless, I won in the end and now all is good with the world.  

 

I ought to say that one thing is critical. The motor must  be mounted on a dead flat surface. One of the crossover pair is on the start of one of the gradients and I hadn't realised that the board here is not quite 100% flat - after much cursing I found that out!

 

More noticeable than point motors is basic progress on the scenery. Not the usual way a model railway is constructed but I wanted to get the potentially messy work in the far corners completed before laying trackwork. This has now gone far enough to allow work to carry on through the station. I've set myself the target of running a train on the complete circuit by the end of May - we'll see! The photo shows the state of play. Bottom left is a 'leaning board' made to bridge the track in this area so that I can work behind it. Trial fit of a facia panel bottom right.

 

Much to do on the hillsides which are foamboard and card formers with plaster bandage applied dry onto PVA coated card strips then dabbed with a wet paintbrush.  The nearer grass is Noch sheets. Savagely expensive but, I feel, a very good base for further work. The more distant section is from Javis sheets. I wouldn't use this close up but in the background it's flat appearance is a bonus.

 

IMG_5322.jpeg.c707ab35e522393bd90a72324fa0fa04.jpeg

 

I'm trying to keep as close as I can to the appearance of this area in the real Grampound Road but an exact copy is just not possible in the area/shape I have. If anybody has a sharp colour photo of the section just east of the station in 1960 (!) I'd be amazed and very pleased to see it, so for general appearance I'm using this as inspiration.

 

1830513157_57305Grampound23July2014.jpg.2683426c849e08bab85f3a47d74a87d5.jpg

 

I posted this on RMWeb back in 2014 - time flies.  57305 (nicknamed Sandcastle at the time)  on the down Beds between Grampound Road and Probus running some 4 hours late due to a china clay train derailment at Loswithiel. High summer, especially on the western, is a cliche for a model railway I know but his model is all about my childhood and our continued love of Cornwall so any critics on that score can look elsewhere! :) 

Edited by TrevorP1
Edit for typos.
  • Like 8
  • Agree 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TrevorP1 said:

High summer, especially on the western, is a cliche for a model railway I know but his model is all about my childhood and our continued love of Cornwall so any critics on that score can look elsewhere! :) 

Couldn't have put that better Trevor. I might borrow it and use it myself!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.