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A new layout, but where to start?


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Hi guys

 

I have had to take down my 6X4 layout as we have decorators coming soon and a new pup which is incompatible with legs and boxes just now :(

 

But I've been given the green light to make a permanent layout in the area.

I have half an idea about using the three sides with a operating area in the middle and maybe a lift up section over by the doorway.

But I don't know where to start!

 

Is there software that can help me or should I approach a layout builder?

 

Here is a photo of what I had, but it does show the area I can use.

 

Thanks for any tips.

 

 

Pic1.jpg

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Hello Mike.  Personally I would go with your suggestion.  You will get much more railway around the walls of the room with the opportunity for something more prototypical.  There are various track plans books available.  Many of the plans by the late Cyril Freezer give ideas for the sort of space which you have.  It might also be worth looking for books by Iain Rice as he has also produced lots of plans to suit your space.

 

Terry

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30 minutes ago, mikesndbs said:

Is there software that can help me or should I approach a layout builder?

 

There is software that can help with design such as Anyrail (https://www.anyrail.com/en/download), but that only helps with seeing whether the track that you are looking at will work as you envisage.  The staring point is the idea, and that has to come from you.  What style of layout do you want?  What era?  what type of stock do you want to run?  Does it need to include shunting?  Are you looking for a place to display locomotives (for which a depot layout may be appropriate)?  Is your interest in passenger or freight trains?  Do you need a station, or would you prefer an industrial backdrop?

 

By all means contact a layout builder, but ultimately, they'll ask you what you want.  That's what they will build.  Once you have an outline idea, post it here and you'll no doubt get comments with regards how it could possibly be improved. 

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I think you have to start by asking yourself what you want from your trainset. Do you just want plenty of trains running round , or something that is an accurate representation of a particular region in a particular location in a particular period of time, or something between ?  Do you want something scenic or plenty of shunting scope . The decision you make will have an impact on your track plan.    It’s worth getting a picture in your mind of what you are aiming to achieve before you go any further.

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Hi guys very many thanks.

 

OK as to what I want this is hugely broad.

I have a very 'Southern emphasis' be that 1938 on or BR.

I certainly want a station, a terminus would be nice.

Shunting absolutely, I find that very relaxing and love shunting locos.

I have a great love of the Southampton docks railway but understand I can not start to represent that extensive network.

 

I run both passenger and goods, loco hauled and units.

 

The layout would need to be anonymous mostly as my collection goes from the Rocket to a class 59!

 

Loco shed is indeed a good plan as are sidings where I can make up trains.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
On 30/08/2020 at 18:07, col.stephens said:

Hello Mike.  Personally I would go with your suggestion.  You will get much more railway around the walls of the room with the opportunity for something more prototypical.  There are various track plans books available.  Many of the plans by the late Cyril Freezer give ideas for the sort of space which you have.  It might also be worth looking for books by Iain Rice as he has also produced lots of plans to suit your space.

 

Terry

 

Looks like a good find here 

Edited by AY Mod
Link to pirate site removed.
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On 30/08/2020 at 20:52, mikesndbs said:

 

Looks like a good find here 

I have always liked Cyril Freezers plans, well thought out and will adapt to any situation.

Edited by AY Mod
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Hi all

 

Here is a very rough plan of the outside edge of the boards.

Try as I might scarm, Anyrail just can't seem to draw the plan to scale and allow me to see how wide the boards can be and give me a clue as to the operating area within :(

 

Any tips would be most appreciated. 

 

 

IMG_8065.JPG

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Your space may be the wrong way round for representing Southampton. But making a few allowances for that, I think that you could have a slightly cutdown version of Southampton Terminus station (mainline trains running terminus to fiddleyard) with a representation  of the docks railway as a continuous run.

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3 hours ago, mikesndbs said:

Try as I might scarm, Anyrail just can't seem to draw the plan to scale and allow me to see how wide the boards can be and give me a clue as to the operating area within :(

 

Any tips would be most appreciated. 

 

I just work in Anyrail to a scale of 1:1.  The top left hand of your plan is coordinate 0, 0.  Then draw a vertical line with the top coordinate at 3140, 0 (assuming you have 3.14 m of wall) and the bottom at 3140, 2720 (assuming that your wall with the window in it is 2.72 m).  Similarly, draw your lower wall as a horizontal line from coordinate 0, 2720 to 3140, 2720.  That's then the size of your room and you can start adding track to match your hand drawn sketch of what you would like.  If your operating well needs to be a particular size or your baseboards a particular width, just offset lines from the wall lines by the required amount.

 

Anyrail will allow you to display / view / print the plan at any scale (eg 1:12), but when drawing it, you are effectively drawing full size.  However, it's primary purpose is to allow you to click the track pieces together rather than necessarily draw out your room.

 

The alternative is of course a sheet of paper, a pencil, ruler and a compass, which worked perfectly well 30 or 40 years ago when I used to sketch out what I thought I'd like.

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54 minutes ago, Dungrange said:

 

I just work in Anyrail to a scale of 1:1.  The top left hand of your plan is coordinate 0, 0.  Then draw a vertical line with the top coordinate at 3140, 0 (assuming you have 3.14 m of wall) and the bottom at 3140, 2720 (assuming that your wall with the window in it is 2.72 m).  Similarly, draw your lower wall as a horizontal line from coordinate 0, 2720 to 3140, 2720.  That's then the size of your room and you can start adding track to match your hand drawn sketch of what you would like.  If your operating well needs to be a particular size or your baseboards a particular width, just offset lines from the wall lines by the required amount.

 

Anyrail will allow you to display / view / print the plan at any scale (eg 1:12), but when drawing it, you are effectively drawing full size.  However, it's primary purpose is to allow you to click the track pieces together rather than necessarily draw out your room.

 

The alternative is of course a sheet of paper, a pencil, ruler and a compass, which worked perfectly well 30 or 40 years ago when I used to sketch out what I thought I'd like.

 

Hi, now I like the sound of that, the coordinates are something I have not understood at all, might give it a look, thanks

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So my plans are like this.

 

I am going to get a carpenter in to make the boards based on my plans above.

I will have a lift out section across the window and into the operating well, however the layout will be lifted much higher than before so that I can duck under easily. The lift outs will only be for maintenance of the window or if I get to stiff as I age to duck under lol.

 

Rather that plan the track out now, I'll add the track to the boards/landscape just like the real thing, this is the only sure way to visualise what can be done.

 

Code 100 Peco, with large radius points and curves are the plan, flexi track where I can (never used this before) with a general idea of what I want in my mind.

 

What would members thought be about this?

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Hi

 

So I have just had my first ever go at making a scale drawing! this is in 1:13 sale.

 

Amazing the difference doing this makes.

 

Board 4 worries me most as it needs to carry the continuous run (double track) from board 1 and 3 and I want to use 3rd radius or 4th if possible.

 

My plan is to use AnyRail and see what fits.

 

Thanks for any tips

 

 

scale layoutplanEN.jpg

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With regard to duckunders   I started my shed layout with  a duckunder but after six months of doing the limbo I got rid of it ,my back feels all the better for it.Good luck with your new layout will watch for updates. 

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I'd think about your length of reach, particularly at a high level. Unless you're planning baseboard 'sub-assemblies' that will just lift into place, you need to be able to reach (preferably easily) all parts of the baseboard. 

 

Also, possibly replacing the curtains with a set of blinds that fit within the window recess. 

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1 hour ago, The White Rabbit said:

I'd think about your length of reach, particularly at a high level. Unless you're planning baseboard 'sub-assemblies' that will just lift into place, you need to be able to reach (preferably easily) all parts of the baseboard. 

 

Also, possibly replacing the curtains with a set of blinds that fit within the window recess. 

 

Hi and many thanks, I found that the 865mm is my max reach, however as this area will have low relief buildings etc I feel that I should have sufficient.

I am raising the boards up so that sitting you are just seeing the tops of the trains, this is to make the duck under easier and to allow storage under, but also because I really like to run near eye level, just feels so much more real :) You are quite right about the curtains, a blind has already been authorised :) 

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26 minutes ago, mikesndbs said:

I found that the 865mm is my max reach, however as this area will have low relief buildings etc I feel that I should have sufficient.

I am raising the boards up so that sitting you are just seeing the tops of the trains, this is to make the duck under easier and to allow storage under, but also because I really like to run near eye level, just feels so much more real.

 

I assume that you are reasonably tall.  I can reach about 850 mm if a layout is below waist level (ie something like 915 mm / 3 foot from the ground) and I'm standing on the floor, but if the layout was at something greater than 1220 mm / 4 foot from the ground, then my reach drops to about 700 mm.  This is because with a layout at or below waist level, part of that reach is achieved by bending the waist, whereas at a higher level, it's determined by the distance from hand to shoulder.  Sitting down with trains at eye level and my reach would be even less because there is a need to bend the arm to avoid obstacles that may be in the way (trees, buildings etc).

 

Remember also that if your maximum reach is 865 mm and your baseboard width is also 865 mm, you won't be able to reach into the corner of the layout as you'd be reaching on a diagonal line rather than perpendicular to the baseboard edge.  Personally, I'd be tempted to go with a narrower board width - something like 760 mm / 3'6" as a maximum.  I'd also try and draw out your plan in a bit more detail before committing to having baseboards built.

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On 30/08/2020 at 20:52, mikesndbs said:

 

Looks like a good find here 

 

Please do not link to dubious sites that are pirating copyright content. It's theft for their benefit and by linking to it you are assisting the scumbags.

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22 hours ago, Dungrange said:

 

I assume that you are reasonably tall.  I can reach about 850 mm if a layout is below waist level (ie something like 915 mm / 3 foot from the ground) and I'm standing on the floor, but if the layout was at something greater than 1220 mm / 4 foot from the ground, then my reach drops to about 700 mm.  This is because with a layout at or below waist level, part of that reach is achieved by bending the waist, whereas at a higher level, it's determined by the distance from hand to shoulder.  Sitting down with trains at eye level and my reach would be even less because there is a need to bend the arm to avoid obstacles that may be in the way (trees, buildings etc).

 

Remember also that if your maximum reach is 865 mm and your baseboard width is also 865 mm, you won't be able to reach into the corner of the layout as you'd be reaching on a diagonal line rather than perpendicular to the baseboard edge.  Personally, I'd be tempted to go with a narrower board width - something like 760 mm / 3'6" as a maximum.  I'd also try and draw out your plan in a bit more detail before committing to having baseboards built.

 

 

Many thanks for the advice.

 

No not that tall lol but I intend the back of the boards against the wall to have buildings and scenic items placing the rails nearer to me.

Also, there are not really hard to get at corners as I can access from outside of the operating area as well.

I am new to drawing plans, can you say what extra detail I should look at please?

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