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8 minutes ago, RobinofLoxley said:

If its already on here I will find it, thanks Alan

 

Ah, I forgot about train stacking.  Train Controller has a nifty feature that allows automated storage of several trains in a single block so that reduced the number of blocks a bit.  I use it in the storage yards.  The feature is called 'line up in a block' and is handled by special formulae in the stopping distances.  Basically as a train departs the block, all the other trains stored in that block move up to fill the space.  Quite clever really and saves on the number of contacts required. 

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4 minutes ago, RobinofLoxley said:

Yes Ive realised that from looking at the track plan.

 

My project is C 1960 using all steam and therefore I have to plan for loco switching in stations. I have planned for three blocks per track on station lines. Similar in most sidings that are dead end, either 2 or 3 blocks depending on siding length and likely use.

 

What software are you planning on using?

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It is correct to have long block sections on most layouts - on a British outline layout with conventional signalling there would only be one train at a time between any two signalboxes on the same line, which In model railway terms would equate to one train between any two stations. 

 

With more modern image you should expect multiple aspect signalling and one block between two consecutive signals.

 

The same would apply for continental practice.

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5 minutes ago, Michael Hodgson said:

It is correct to have long block sections on most layouts - on a British outline layout with conventional signalling there would only be one train at a time between any two signalboxes on the same line, which In model railway terms would equate to one train between any two stations. 

 

With more modern image you should expect multiple aspect signalling and one block between two consecutive signals.

 

The same would apply for continental practice.


just for clarity a block would be from signal to signal

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26 minutes ago, Alan Kettlewell said:

 

Ah, I forgot about train stacking.  Train Controller has a nifty feature that allows automated storage of several trains in a single block so that reduced the number of blocks a bit.  I use it in the storage yards.  The feature is called 'line up in a block' and is handled by special formulae in the stopping distances.  Basically as a train departs the block, all the other trains stored in that block move up to fill the space.  Quite clever really and saves on the number of contacts required. 


I did try train stacking but I didn’t like it as it did give unpredictable results. I found the first train would stop per the formula but the second would run into the first. Eventually I gave up and made smaller blocks with triggers to move up.

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30 minutes ago, RobinofLoxley said:

Yes Ive realised that from looking at the track plan.

 

My project is C 1960 using all steam and therefore I have to plan for loco switching in stations. I have planned for three blocks per track on station lines. Similar in most sidings that are dead end, either 2 or 3 blocks depending on siding length and likely use.

I wonder if you mean feedbacks rather than blocks?

 

Feedbacks are the bits that report occupancy (in some form or other) and blocks are the logical construct that the train occupies. You can have multiple feedbacks in a single block.

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1 hour ago, Alan Kettlewell said:

 

Ah, I forgot about train stacking.  Train Controller has a nifty feature that allows automated storage of several trains in a single block so that reduced the number of blocks a bit.  I use it in the storage yards.  The feature is called 'line up in a block' and is handled by special formulae in the stopping distances.  Basically as a train departs the block, all the other trains stored in that block move up to fill the space.  Quite clever really and saves on the number of contacts required. 

 

I thought this would be useful for the storage yards but found it wanting. Trains are moved up at threshold speeds, so it takes ages. Instead my long storage roads are divided into 2, 3 or 4 blocks and when a train leaves the first block there's an action on block release to start a schedule to move the next train up. A much better arrangement than having a point ladder in the middle, as I'd originally done.

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On 30/11/2020 at 15:32, Andymsa said:


thanks will look later when I am home. 
 

not a merg member unfortunately 

 

I've only just come across this thread, but I can advise that the Dingo Servo mounts are not exclusive to MERG (although David who produces them is a MERG member).

 

They can be ordered through David's website - http://dingoservo.co.uk/

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1 hour ago, WIMorrison said:

I wonder if you mean feedbacks rather than blocks?

 

Feedbacks are the bits that report occupancy (in some form or other) and blocks are the logical construct that the train occupies. You can have multiple feedbacks in a single block.

I am constantly deceiving you as to my level of understanding of blocks and feedbacks

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1 hour ago, Michael Hodgson said:

It is correct to have long block sections on most layouts - on a British outline layout with conventional signalling there would only be one train at a time between any two signalboxes on the same line, which In model railway terms would equate to one train between any two stations. 

 

With more modern image you should expect multiple aspect signalling and one block between two consecutive signals.

 

The same would apply for continental practice.

Placing and integrating signals is going to be  massive challenge for me. One thing at a time however

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39 minutes ago, RFS said:

 

I thought this would be useful for the storage yards but found it wanting. Trains are moved up at threshold speeds, so it takes ages. Instead my long storage roads are divided into 2, 3 or 4 blocks and when a train leaves the first block there's an action on block release to start a schedule to move the next train up. A much better arrangement than having a point ladder in the middle, as I'd originally done.


exactly what I did.

 

i forgot about the threshold speed of the move up 

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2 hours ago, RobinofLoxley said:

Placing and integrating signals is going to be  massive challenge for me. One thing at a time however

Yes, but it affects where you put your rail breaks and occupancy detectors

 

Modellers tend to come onto signalling forums with a question along the lines of I'm building this GWR layout, what signals should I have where - and all too often they get the unfortunate answer that the GWR would have had a different track layout because of ...

 

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19 minutes ago, Michael Hodgson said:

Yes, but it affects where you put your rail breaks and occupancy detectors

 

Modellers tend to come onto signalling forums with a question along the lines of I'm building this GWR layout, what signals should I have where - and all too often they get the unfortunate answer that the GWR would have had a different track layout because of ...

 

Im sure that is true. However a lot of my layout choices have been determined by the structure of my loft, which has A-type frames every 60cm and a space only about 1.5M wide down th centre. My track mostly will run between the two angled struts of the A-frame which are themselves about 60cm apart at the height I am building. In my trackplan I have five signalboxes in logical locations and should be able to develop signalling around those; I should add that I am not looking for a prototypical approach.

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