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As close as I could get to a 'real' colour used on them, anyway, Bernard. :D

A little more work on fences. A lick of paint, all-over grey first (first pic), then some steel colour on the railings makes it look a bit more convincing. This is actually the Ratio 423 GWR fencing but with the nylon 'wire' replaced with .020" plastic micro-rod substituted to represent steel tubing. It is a little bit of a compromise in that the tubes should go through holes in the posts, but I couldn't see me drilling all those holes on the plastic posts.

The Peco flexible field fencing on the right also had a quick and light spray over with grey primer.

No. 8, Sherlock Holmes is seen once again, followed by 5 BEL unit 3052.

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P_20190107_235018_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_111156_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_111145_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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Starting to look like you better do the rear side before continuing on with the front!

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Doug, I am keeping the scenery at the front low, and leaving places to lean on behind the trains, as well as having some access from the back of the layout too. But, yes, I am keeping in mind that I still have much work to do further back. Those poplars are only black-tacked in place and probably will not remain in that position for the future.  :)

After playing around with fences and a few hedges, I have returned to this setting at present. I had some lovely rough hedging that looked absolutely great in the corner of the foreground field, but it obscured the trains and the car. Since I intended this scene to be a photographic backdrop, that just didn't make the cut. I have added the row of poplars in the background, and removed the upturned tree.

Anyway, here are a couple of my London Transport EMUs, a little out of their normal environment.

First up, two photos of a 5-car train of 1938 CO/CP Stock (1 x 2-car unit, 1 x 3-car unit), as it would have appeared in the 1960s. These are all built from Harrow Model Shop/Radley white metal kits, so are very heavy, and require two Black Beetle motor bogies.

The other two photos show a mixed 5-car train of Q Stock, with cars of 1923, 1938, 1927 and 1931 stocks. These are all resin kits from a couple of different sources, but, again, have two Black Beetles in one of the 1923 DM cars powering the set.

Both trains are intended to be expanded to six cars at some time in the future.

The cars are from the TPM CarKit4 range, combining resin body shells and white metal chassis and fittings, with a few etched components as well. One is a Hillman Hunter (mark 1) and the other is a Humber Sceptre, built with optional parts in the same kit. They also had parts for a Hillman Hunter Mk 2.

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P_20190108_181415_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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url=https://flic.kr/p/23tDynT]P_20190108_181445_vHDR_Oncropped[/url] by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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url=https://flic.kr/p/QjMCKi]P_20190108_182223_vHDR_Oncropped[/url] by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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url=https://flic.kr/p/QjMCT4]P_20190108_182235_vHDR_Oncropped[/url] by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


And for effect, a monochrome version of the Q Stock.

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P_20190108_182235_vHDR_On croppedBW by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr
 

Edited by SRman
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A mixed selection of multiple units, of both electric and diesel types.

Continuing the London Transport ones first, the first photos are of 1920 F Stock. This is a 4-car unit still under construction but able to run. The centre cars are unglazed and the bodies are quite loose on their underframes. Once again, two Black Beetle motor bogies power this unit, and I have plans to add one more car. The kits were from Harrow Model Shop, but one of the DM cars hasa Radley resin body.

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P_20190108_214228_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_214256_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Now to the main line types. First up are ex-Southern Railway units running in the late 1960s or early '70s condition, with a 2 BIL in green with full yellow ends leading a blue 2 HAL and another HAL in green with full yellow ends.

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P_20190108_215015_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_215044_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


From the same period, but much more recently built, a 4 VEP in plain BR blue with small yellow ends. This model pre-dates the Hornby units by several decades, and is, in fact, four Lima restaurant cars with MJT brass sides and white metal driving ends, and a Lima class 73 motor bogie.

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P_20190108_220118_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_220246_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Moving on to the mid- to late 1980s, a class 455/8 unit passes in Network South East livery. This was built from a Bratchell Models kit and motorised with a Replica Railways chassis.

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P_20190108_215837_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_215805_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Also from the same period is a Network South East class 456, built from a Bratchell kit, but unmotorised (it works with the class 455 normally).

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P_20190108_214557_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


And finally, moving into the privatisation era, a visitor to the Southern metals in the form of four class 153 single-car units. Only the black one has not had its livery modified,with the blue and pink units having Electra Railway Graphics vinyl overlays, and the Regional Railways one having been second-hand with some poorly painted additions in some areas, so it had some livery touch-ups and fixes.

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P_20190108_221159_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_221220_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190108_221208_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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Moving on, some more of my London Transport/London Underground Limited multiple units.

The first two photos show a pristine EFE 4-car set of 1938 stock in original livery with cream window pillars. This set is, as yet, unmotorised.

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P_20190109_101342_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190109_101331_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Next, another EFE 1938 set, but one I have tinkered with the livery - no cream window pillars as in their later days, representing the 1960s - and with a Black Beetle motor bogie fitted. The Black Beetle struggles with the four cars (including itself), but I have some MetroModels pin-point bogies to fit, which should reduce the considerable drag created by the existing bogies.

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P_20190109_101041_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190109_101107_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


I also have a 4-car silver set of tube stock (1959/62 stock) from EFE, which does have a motorised chassis fitted but this still needs work and doesn't sit correctly on the track. I have taken photos of it as a 3-car set with no motor.

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P_20190109_100904_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190109_100849_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

 

Bringing us right up to date is a 6-car set of S Stock from the London Transport Museum/Bachmann. The interior lights are wired directly to the wheel pickups so remain permanently on as long as there is track power. I forgot to turn on the headlights for the photos.

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P_20190109_102437_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190109_102454_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190109_102400_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190109_102346_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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As close as I could get to a 'real' colour used on them, anyway, Bernard. :D

 

A little more work on fences. A lick of paint, all-over grey first (first pic), then some steel colour on the railings makes it look a bit more convincing. This is actually the Ratio 423 GWR fencing but with the nylon 'wire' replaced with .020" plastic micro-rod substituted to represent steel tubing. It is a little bit of a compromise in that the tubes should go through holes in the posts, but I couldn't see me drilling all those holes on the plastic posts.

 

The Peco flexible field fencing on the right also had a quick and light spray over with grey primer.

 

No. 8, Sherlock Holmes is seen once again, followed by 5 BEL unit 3052.

 

45740095235_5b1ffd846e_b.jpg

P_20190107_235018_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

 

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P_20190108_111156_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

 

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P_20190108_111145_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

 

Is that a Vauxhall Victor FD?

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Is that a Vauxhall Victor FD?

It is, indeed. It is a TPM CarKit4 resin and white metal kit, hence my call to Bernard Taylor before. :)

Edited by SRman

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It is, indeed. It is a TPM CarKit4 resin and white metal kit, hence my call to Bernard Taylor before. :)

 

If I had gone back a page, I would have seen what you mention. :)

 

From where are they available?

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If I had gone back a page, I would have seen what you mention. :)

 

From where are they available?

 

TPM's website, but I don't think Bernard Taylor is making them any more. There may possibly be a few kits stuck on a back shelf somewhere, but you would have to ask Bernard, perhaps with a PM as he is on the forum. 

 

http://www.tpmodels.co.uk/4mmdetails.html

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Newton Broadway seems to have fallen through a worm hole and ended up in the Sydney (Australia) area, sometime in the late 1970s or early 1980s!

Interurban V set V4 in original 'blue goose' livery passes one of the first batch of Mercedes 0305 buses in original livery. The V sets were built in batches over nearly 20 years, with the first sets, to a slightly different pattern, entering service in 1970, while the last build went into service in 1989. Early ones have been withdrawn, but quite a few of the later ones are still in service. The model is from Auscision, and was a little bit of an extravagance on my part (tax refund!).

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P_20190110_112510_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190110_112555_vHDR_On cropped by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190110_112414_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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Moving back to southern England, and just after the end of steam on the Southern Region, around 1967/8. A class 33 D6520 hauls 4TC set 416, probably heading for Weymouth. For the return journey, the set will be driven from the 4TC cab with the 33 pushing. At Bournemouth, the TC will be attached to a 4 REP EMU at the London end, probably with another 4TC at the Weymouth end. The 33 will uncouple and the REP will take the TCs on to London. The 33 will wait at Bournemouth for the next incoming REP/TC/TC combination, and pull one or both TCs to Weymouth ... and so on. This went on until the mod 1980s, when the class 442 5-WES units took over the services, by then electrified all the way to Weymouth.

The 4TC units were versatile and, while their main reason for being was the London - Bournemouth-Weymouth service, they did pop up elsewhere, with a couple of (re-formed) units even finding their way into London Underground Limited's ownership for special services after BR had finished with them.

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P_20190111_185753_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190111_185859_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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Here we go again, this time with some more modern diesels and an electric. All of the named examples have etched plates fitted, either as supplied by the manufacturer, or bought as third party add-ons.

Listing them in numerical class order, class 58 is represented by three Heljan locos:

58 017 is in the class' original "red stripe" railfreight grey livery.

58 004 is in the pre-privatisation Mainline livery adapted from the previous Railfreight 'triple grey' livery.

58 024 is in the privatisation era EW&S livery, which was later simplified slightly to just EWS.

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P_20190117_214652_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_214856_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_215559_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Next is my solitary class 59, 59 005 Kenneth J Painter, which has a Lima body on a newer Hornby chassis. I have fitted head and white marker lights at this end only. I will try to do a neater installation at the other end in the future, but I don't see the need to waste my efforts on working tail lights.

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P_20190117_212230_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Class 60 is next, with three Hornby examples in my collection:

60 077 Canisp is in the intermediate triple grey Mainline livery.

60 078 is in the 'proper' Mainline aircraft blue, and is heavily weathered.

60 048 is in EWS maroon, with the later branding style than 58 024.


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P_20190117_215007_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_215201_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_215407_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Class 66 is well represented, with all being Bachmann examples.

EWS 66 089 came to me as a very heavily weathered example - a bit too heavily weathered for my liking. I de-weathered it a little and renumbered it while I was in the process of repainting sections.

66 701 Whitemoor is in the attractive GBRf blue and orange livery.

66 522 is in the very distinctive Freightliner/Shanks livery.

66 610 is in standard Freightliner livery and has the later style headlamps.

66 407 and 66 412 are in DRS 'compass' livery. 66 412 is a little bit of a hybrid with a later body style but an earlier chassis fitted - bought like that with sound fitted so worth the asking price.

66 425 Sunderland is in First GBRf livery.

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P_20190117_212429_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_212700_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_212919_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_213020_vHDR_On (1) by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_214025_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_213248_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_213445_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


The new Vossloh class 68s from Dapol are attractive models. 68 002 Intrepid and 68 003 Astute feature next, with both in DRS livery.

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P_20190117_214238_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190117_214422_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


The GEC Class 70 can not be called attractive by any stretch of the imagination, although Bachmann's model is superb. The real ones earned the nickname "Ugly Bettys". 70 003 shown here is in Freightliner Powerhaul livery.

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P_20190117_213624_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Based on the class 60 styling, but with more rounded contours, class 92 dual voltage electric locomotives were slightly more attractive. 92 022 Charles Dickens is in Railfreight Distribution livery. This is a Hornby body with a modified Hornby class 60 chassis and modified lighting. I do have more accurate 3D-printed pantographs to fit when I get around to it. The pantos do not need to be operational on my layout as all electrics are running on (dummy) third rail (third and fourth rail in the case of the London Transport stock)!

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P_20190117_215816_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Finally, and on a completely different tack, a new addition which cost as much as a locomotive is the CMX track cleaner from the USA.

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P_20190117_215922_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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The CMX Track Cleaner wagon had its first test run this evening. I top-and-tailed it with two Heljan class 33/1 locos, although one was more than capable of shifting it, as the second half of this video demonstrates.

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The recent spell of hot weather means that I have not been doing much in the train room - that remains hot because I have to keep the doors closed because of two certain young cats who love to poke around in there given half a chance!

I did get a few more road vehicles under way - some John Day and TPM CarKit 4 models. More about them later. I also started on one of the more permanent buffer stops to replace all the temporary ones from various different sources. The Peco ones aren't too bad so may remain in places, but the others have to go. I dug out one of a batch of Mike's Models buffer stop kits (type C) which represents at least some of the Southern constituents' practices. I used Araldite to assemble it, and it is a little rough but that was a learning process. The sleepers have come from a short off-cut of Peco bullhead track. There's a photo of it on the workbench in unfinished state, and a couple of it in a finished state in place, but not anchored, on the layout. I will have to re-ballast that area too.

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P_20190127_105744_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190127_134314_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190127_134325_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


These also show a little bit of fencing I have been playing with at the end of the siding, and protecting the level crossing access. This is a bit of Ratio spear fencing with a gate (in black). All of it is in raw plastic but I haven't decided what colour the fence and gate should be in yet: obvious ones are white, black or green. Here are a couple of earlier shots showing the arrangement in more detail. Note that it isn't glued down yet. These also show the earlier, unsatisfactory (to me) temporary buffer stop. The new, slightly shorter stop means the gate looks as if it actually has room to swing open.

Note also work has commenced on the four-rail fence, with the top rail now glued in place.

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P_20190126_215429_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190126_215446_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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Just in case anyone is wondering: do I have a plan in what I do next?

Answer: No. not really. I do what I feel like doing at the time, within the overall constraints of certain things have to be done before other jobs can follow.

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As a slight divergence from the fencing work, I have 'bitumened' the goods yard/engine shed roadway, and the occupation crossing leading in, using a textured spray paint.

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P_20190128_103931_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190128_103943_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

 

Continuing the development of the lineside fencing, I have added the railings to the posts over a few sessions to help preserve my back. The first photo shows the tools and materials involved. As can be seen, I decided a green suited the fences at the level crossing end.

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P_20190128_123658_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190128_123613_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190128_123623_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190128_171723_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190128_171613_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190128_171704_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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The fencing off of the public footpath from the railway is almost complete now. there are a few spots where railings have pulled away from their posts and will have to be re-glued, and a few very minor paint touch-ups required, but otherwise I am very pleased with the overall effect.

I want to add some appropriate signs and a few cast iron (white metal) bollards at each end of the path t complete the scene.

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P_20190130_220053_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190130_220117_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Trying out a slightly different viewpoint, class 700 0-6-0 30315 passes the same location with a mixed goods train with 20 wagons.

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P_20190202_114349_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


The modern class 68 in the upper left of the above photo spoils the illusion slightly, but was on track cleaning duties with the new CMX track cleaning tank wagon. I am also trying out Track Magic fluid in it for the first time. So far it has now cleaned all of the outer track and loops, but still has some of the inner loop lines to traverse.

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And now for something completely different!

I enjoyed my rides on Danish IC3 DMUs so much I wanted a model as a momento. The only model of these units in HO scale has been from Heljan in the early 2000s. They had some mechanical problems and weren't especially detailed, but they looked reasonable. There were several livery variants released, including two different DSB (Danish state railways) versions, a Swedish (SJ) one (their class Y2) and an Amtrak one, marketed as a Walthers model. They are all as scarce as hen's teeth!

I managed to locate one in the Swedish 'Kustpilen' livery (literally 'coast pillow', as far as I can ascertain) at a reasonable price in France, and it arrived today. I may, at some stage, repaint it into DSB silver with dark blue window strips, but for the present it will remain in SJ livery. I have already done one modification to improve reliability, and that is to tap a small screw into the base of the centre car at each end to locate the bogies, which previously just rested there and tended to pull out the drive shafts (a known fault with these models). The centre car has a central motor and flywheels, whereas the real ones have the outer, driving cars powered (with two Deutz engines each) and the centre section unpowered. It was DCC-ready and now has a Lenz Standard+ V2 decoder fitted.

The unit has run successfully around Newton Broadway, but still needs a little adjustment and fettling before I can say it is totally reliable.

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P_20190212_213559_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190212_213614_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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7 hours ago, SRman said:

And now for something completely different!

I enjoyed my rides on Danish IC3 DMUs so much I wanted a model as a momento. The only model of these units in HO scale has been from Heljan in the early 2000s. They had some mechanical problems and weren't especially detailed, but they looked reasonable. There were several livery variants released, including two different DSB (Danish state railways) versions, a Swedish (SJ) one (their class Y2) and an Amtrak one, marketed as a Walthers model. They are all as scarce as hen's teeth!

I managed to locate one in the Swedish 'Kustpilen' livery (literally 'coast pillow', as far as I can ascertain) at a reasonable price in France, and it arrived today. I may, at some stage, repaint it into DSB silver with dark blue window strips, but for the present it will remain in SJ livery. I have already done one modification to improve reliability, and that is to tap a small screw into the base of the centre car at each end to locate the bogies, which previously just rested there and tended to pull out the drive shafts (a known fault with these models). The centre car has a central motor and flywheels, whereas the real ones have the outer, driving cars powered (with two Deutz engines each) and the centre section unpowered. It was DCC-ready and now has a Lenz Standard+ V2 decoder fitted.

The unit has run successfully around Newton Broadway, but still needs a little adjustment and fettling before I can say it is totally reliable.

46156919365_1419f70411_b.jpg
P_20190212_213559_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

46156919095_249fc2e97c_b.jpg
P_20190212_213614_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

I know you have a soft spot for it, but that is one odd unit!!! Striking though.

Interesting thought, you said they had Deutz power plants? I think they will be air-cooled then. The Magirus Deutz wagons I have driven were air-cooled as were the Deutz tractors. It was one hell of an engine and nigh on unburstable!

                                                                                                                                                                      Chris.

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I'm not 100% sure on this (translations of information from Danish to English can be a little odd, at times!), but I believe the initial engines fitted were air-cooled, but later ones, and refurbished units, are water cooled. What information is available is that the type of Deutz engines and the mechanical ZF automatic gearbox specifications changed with later batches. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IC3

Whatever the actual case is, these units are smooth-riding, quiet, comfortable, and accelerate quickly to their maximum speed of 180kph. They wouldn't win any beauty awards, but the rubber-nosed design has featured on the subsequent 4-car IR4 EMUs (which can couple up to and work in multiple with the IC3 units), and also on the Oresund trains which run into Sweden, but are incompatible with the IC3/IR4 units.

On our trip from Copenhagen to Hamburg via Fredericia on the Jutland Peninsula, we had unit 5058 for the leg to Fredericia, then changed trains to 5085 for the rest of the journey (only certain units have the necessary German Automatic Train Control fitted, so 5085 seems to be a well-photographed unit at Hamburg). There was an eight minute cross-platform changeover time allowed, which worried me a little as here in Australia that would probably result in a missed connection. As it was, the DSB trains were dead on time all the way. I should add that I was able to get us into 1st class for the same price as Standard class on the earlier train I had originally planned to use., just by taking a train an hour later than planned.

Edited by SRman
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I have done some further re-engineering of the IC3 unit, and it now runs happily around the layout, including through reverse curves with no problems. Improvements/modifications have included adding self-tapping screws to locate the inner ends of the centre bogies (replacing useless little moulded plastic 'pips', adding a fair amount of lead weight to the outer driving cars, extending the spigots on top of the powered bogies to ensure the leading and trailing cars can't pop off, thus keeping the weight on the powered bogies, and bending the rather stiff wires to keep them clear of the pivot points (the wires really need replacing with thinner, more flexible wiring, but that can be done later).

The result is a DMU that I can set off running, and sit back and enjoy. I have uploaded a short video to YouTube to show it off.

 




As an aside, the Swedish livery doesn't look too out of place against some of my Network South East stock! To give an idea of the size of the real things, the Heljan model is HO scale, and doesn't look all that small against the British OO stock, but the fairest comparison is to put it side by side with the HO scale NSW interurban V set.

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P_20190216_110950_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr/url

 

Edited by SRman
Trying to get video link to work.
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To have a few other trains to run alongside the Danish/Swedish unit, I have been dabbling with a few passenger and freight models from Roco and Piko, with locos from Piko (mostly their very basic, budget range) and a lucky purchase from eBay of a HobbyTrade DSB ME diesel electric loco.

The first of the wagons were two Roco steel wagons, one with sliding tarpaulin, the other of the telescoping hood style. I have started weathering both wagons, seen in the company with DB class BR 185, 185 066.

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P_20190302_124011_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190303_165439_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


DSB ME 1506 seen posed on its own, then with a short train of Roco DSB coaches, beside DB 185 066.

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P_20190226_170559_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190226_212100_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190226_212047_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


In the meantime, some more European wagons and locos arrived, from the Roco and Piko ranges. I have not as yet weathered any of the new arrivals. I am sure the train formation is not particularly prototypical, but it adds a nice splash of colour to the Continental contingent. The locos are another BR 185, 185 540, in Kassel Huskies livery, and 182 003 in standard DB traffic red. 

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P_20190306_205829_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190306_205939_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190306_205809_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190306_210053_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190309_103008_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190309_103034_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Back with the British railways, just arrived at Newton Broadway is my second Golden Valley Hobbies Janus industrial diesel electric loco. I actually ordered this one sound-fitted around two to three years ago. Anyway, it ran perfectly straight out of the box, and the legomanbiffo sound fitted as standard is superb.

In line with all of my fictional industrial locos, she now sports name and number plates from Narrow Planet, in my own series for No. 17, Amy.

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P_20190309_102518_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190309_102530_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr


Additionally, I managed to get a Heljan green Western diesel hydraulic, D1002, Western Explorer, with some detailing and weathering already done. More to the point, I got it at a reasonable price.

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P_20190309_121728_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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P_20190309_121823_vHDR_On by Jeffrey Lynn, on Flickr

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A video showing the above European models running on Newton Broadway.

 

 

 

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Nice pictures and videos here:senile::good:

 

 

cheers neil..

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