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Les Green

Lime Street Station

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Been following this thread for quite a while now but never commented. Absolutely incredible work on here. A true inspiration regardless of what you model.

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Posted (edited)

Edit: I was reading the thread and must've accidentally leaned on my keyboard, I hadn't meant to post a reply! But nevertheless, awe-inspiring and definitely aspiration. 

Edited by AVS1998
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On 24/07/2019 at 19:36, Les Green said:

Finally the Glasgow to Liverpool sleeper train is completed. For the first time today it ran into the station hauled by Coronation Class locomotive 'City of Liverpool".

The seven coach train is made up of seven Comet coach kits, Each coach has pickups so we can add lighting at a later date. The corridor connections are made up of two 3D printed components and remain in contact with the adjacent coach around any of the curves, Weathering is next as they are a bit too clean at the moment!

Hi Les,

 

Can you tell us a bit more about the corridor connections, please?

 

Thanks,

 

Stan

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18 hours ago, Stanley Melrose said:

Hi Les,

 

Can you tell us a bit more about the corridor connections, please?

 

Thanks,

 

Stan

 

The corridor connections were designed so that we could minimise the distance between the coaches. The buffers were modified to be as as short as possible and the gap between the coach buffers was set to 3mm. On a curve of four foot radius meant the compressed connections could protrude 1mm from the buffers. Making the connections expand by 1-2mm allowed them to stay in contact at all times.

They were designed on Autocad with all the correct size of Comet components included on the drawing.

 

2024955766_Coachend.jpg.7674953dfcd17ddf4a72a5c480040425.jpg

 

The above shows the connection in its compressed state with the end cover omitted. The two components, an inner piece and an outer piece were then printed. The following drawing shows the two components ready for sending to the printer.

 

1708234843_CoachConnection.jpg.e6b4e9ec339870a70821949893a5182b.jpg

 

Once printed the two components were joined with a short section of B&Q draught excluder.

 

1474900526_Conn2.jpg.76dcd1218b5fd7b4b7573f4359fcff7c.jpg

 

The completed connection was then fixed to the coach end. The support arms are made from 1mm brass angle and the moving part made from a small 0.45mm diameter lace pin with a small spring glued onto the pin to keep it in place.

This photo shows a test piece. It does need a bit of tidying up before it is painted, but this was effectively a proof of concept model.

 

2066979290_Conn1.jpg.35cd975f5c5f5b8a82e9b3bcc45461f6.jpg

 

The final connections do look good and were worth the effort. They do stay in contact when the coaches traverse our curves.

The coach connections of the outer coaches in the rake are fixed in the compressed position as our rakes do not change.

 

Hope that helps!

 

 

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Thank you for posting your trial video. 

I have to admit I never knew about the existence of a 1938 Stanier 'suburban' articulated triplet set until I watched it drawn through the tunnel in your video. 

more ... more ...

dh

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Hi dh,

 

Thanks for your comment.

 

If you're interested in the articulated stock, please refer to Essery & Jenkinson's book "The LMS Coach 1923 - 1957"

Chapter 12 is "Articulated General Service Stock".

 

There were 11 Triplet sets built during 1937.

There were also a total of 55 twin sets, built to 3 diagrams.

 

Steve.

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Is the stop at the Down gantry simply to transfer the train to the station operator? I'd imagine that many real trains would have been halted there, so acceptable in the model, but I don't think it was a mandatory stop and some would have entered the station without stopping.

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You're absolutely correct, we do use the Gantry stop to hand over control.

It's not absolutely necessary, as there is a handover position just "off scene" in the tunnel at the edge of the scenic section.

From there a train can be driven through to the station without stopping.

However, that location is not very visible to the station operators, who check for the presence of a train before setting up its route.

Stopping at that location would also leave the train bridging the Sector Plate, so preventing it's use for any other movements.

 

As you say, we believe most if not all trains stopped at the Gantry and anecdotal evidence supports this.

(Not many of us can remember such details from 1947).

The location on a falling gradient to a terminus may have required such a stop to prevent over-speed driving???

 

Steve.

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5 hours ago, Steve Hewitt said:

You're absolutely correct, we do use the Gantry stop to hand over control.

It's not absolutely necessary, as there is a handover position just "off scene" in the tunnel at the edge of the scenic section.

From there a train can be driven through to the station without stopping.

However, that location is not very visible to the station operators, who check for the presence of a train before setting up its route.

Stopping at that location would also leave the train bridging the Sector Plate, so preventing it's use for any other movements.

 

As you say, we believe most if not all trains stopped at the Gantry and anecdotal evidence supports this.

(Not many of us can remember such details from 1947).

The location on a falling gradient to a terminus may have required such a stop to prevent over-speed driving???

 

Steve.

 

 

Also gives the paying public the opportunity to see the models close up

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8 hours ago, Steve Hewitt said:

You're absolutely correct, we do use the Gantry stop to hand over control.

It's not absolutely necessary, as there is a handover position just "off scene" in the tunnel at the edge of the scenic section.

From there a train can be driven through to the station without stopping.

However, that location is not very visible to the station operators, who check for the presence of a train before setting up its route.

Stopping at that location would also leave the train bridging the Sector Plate, so preventing it's use for any other movements.

 

As you say, we believe most if not all trains stopped at the Gantry and anecdotal evidence supports this.

(Not many of us can remember such details from 1947).

The location on a falling gradient to a terminus may have required such a stop to prevent over-speed driving???

 

Steve.

Thanks for that. I don't remember such a requirement from my guarding days at Edge Hill, but they started in 1973. But there was a very severe speed limit all the way from Edge Hill station,15mph if I remember rightly. Things might have been different in 1947, but I wasn't around then either!

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The aspect on the home signal looked yellow to me, not the green that I would have expected.  Is that what was done at Lime St in LMS days?

Paul.

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Even in 2014 the two Down signals on the similar gantry showed only two aspects: Yellow and Red, the equivalent of a Fixed Distant with semaphores. As far as I know, that was always the case at that location.

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On 24/09/2019 at 18:52, 5BarVT said:

The aspect on the home signal looked yellow to me, not the green that I would have expected.  Is that what was done at Lime St in LMS days?

Paul.

 

As LMS2968 has already explained, the Yellow aspects are equivalent to semaphore fixed distants.

 

I understand the meaning "Proceed with caution, expect the next signal to be Red", is appropriate.

The next signal will be the Red lamp on the Buffer Stop.

 

1181778235_2014-02-2814_22_49.jpg.35a63cd464816b7c303073c95e280433.jpg

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WIGAN Exhibition,       5th & 6th October 2019.

I  regret to have to announce that due to ill health we will not be able to exhibit the layout at the upcoming Wigan exhibition.

 

Three of the Lime Street Crew will instead be demonstrating their skills (or lack of them)  as a small compensation.

Please come along for a chat and to ask any questions about the layout.

 

Steve

 

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