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On 21/07/2019 at 22:50, justin1985 said:

Many thanks for all of the replies. I've been very busy over the weekend and only just had a chance to have another fiddle with it.

 

Am I right in thinking that has isolated the problem to being the front left hand wheel (i.e. binding only occurs when that wheel has a rod on it). Does that make sense? So the problem is isolated to the crank throw, or the fit of the rod (?), on that particular wheel?

 

Thanks again

 

Justin

 

From talking to some of the Association products team recently, I'm pretty sure that the crank throw is one of the dimensions measured as part of the final checks performed on the loco wheels before they are sent to the shops, so I would be surprised if this was found to be 'out' by a significant amount.

 

There is an interesting article by the late Dr Peter Clark on the subject of measuring loco wheels which can be found on the 2mm Magazine backnumber DVD/USB. Written in 1996, it predates the introduction of the Mk 4 loco wheel, but Peter's measuring device is still used for checking loco wheels.

 

Andy

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Is the Society Wheel Turning Service still operating? I'm sure I read somewhere that the long standing provider has had to retire, but I can't find where I read it. My problem is that I have several Dapol diesels that need modifying so I cant use the repalcement wheel sets

I've checked on the VAG and the Society Web page but there doesn't seem to be any info (or I can't see for looking!)

Many thanks

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As far as I understand it, and I'm open to correction, Gordon has retired from doing the final machining of wheels for the shop, but is still willing to turn down proprietary wheels for members. 

 

Jim 

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36 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

As far as I understand it, and I'm open to correction, Gordon has retired from doing the final machining of wheels for the shop, but is still willing to turn down proprietary wheels for members. 

 

Jim 

 

You’re quite right Jim. While Gordon has retired from loco wheel fabrication duties, he has kindly offered to continue reprofiling wheels for members. His details are in the Yearbook.

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Many thanks for the info; part of the problem was that the society magazine that mentioned the matter suffered an unwanted dose of a hot drink which rendered it unreadable! I will have to start sorting out a request.

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On 22/07/2019 at 09:36, CF MRC said:

It’s well worth getting an eye glass (loupe) and looking at the position of the crank pin in the hole as it rotates. The first option is to try tweaking the position of it by altering the quartering, as I mentioned above.  The next option is to use a small round file and ‘stretch’ the hole away from the bind. 

 

Tim

 

Many thanks for all of the suggestions on the 57xx chassis. 

 

Looking under magnification, the hole was so tight I couldn’t see any particular side it was binding on. I opened that particular hole out with a tiny broach and eventually could see the pin touching one side at the point it was binding and adjust the quartering in the opposing direction. Eventually I managed to tweak that wheel’s quartering just enough to get it running pretty smoothly. 

 

Its still not quite as free running with the rods on that wheel than without. But I was definitely at the point where further tweaking in the same direction made it worse, and I had to go back in the other direction.

 

I think I’ll put it away for now until I can get a second opinion of whether it’s running smoothly enough to progress further. Time to focus on the distillery plank layout, I think.

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If the chassis frames for a shunter are 1 mm thick, is it necessary to have P/B bearings fitted for the drivers axles? The engine will "work" a shunting plank, at low speeds, so not many "miles".

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Probably not, depending upon what the frames are made of. 

 

Tim

 

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19 minutes ago, CF MRC said:

Probably not, depending upon what the frames are made of. 

 

Tim

 

Thanks, Tim. I've just noticed, I didn't actually mention that the frames are made of brass.

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Unlikely to be a problem on a shunting plank. On CF we have had good results with plain PB frames and the Association brass axles. 

 

Tim

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To hold the two parts of a solid brass chassis together I used nylon rod as screw plugs. In the past I experimented with 2-part Milliput. The nylon rod seems to work better (the screws became loose quicker when tighten into the Milliput plugs. I have seen the Nigel Ashton's article in the 2MM Magazine, where he explains how to make plugs out of Araldite but I've never tried that method. Henk recommends Tufnol rod, which I intend to think is the best option, but I cannot find anywhere such small diameter rod, and I don't have a lathe to turn down a larger rod.

 

Any feedback?

IMG_20190730_202601.jpg

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Could anyone help in  identifying the the two identical components marked with an asterisk in the photographs below (front and back view of the etch)? They are part of an Worsley Works scratch-aid kit for a SER Class O engine.

 

 

ww_o_tender_front.jpg

ww_o_tender_back.jpg

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you could take a photocopy of the etch, cut the pieces out  and then try to see where they might fit being able to see if they fit against anything.

 

Don

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I would think that it is the coal space door, similar to the one on this B16 tender:

http://www.railway-models-and-art.co.uk/blog/?m=201705

Edit: but why two? maybe I'm wrong...

Edit 2: this link seems to confirm my first thought:

 

And did you find the SER kits instructions for their 7mm scale model? Lots of information there:

https://serkits.com/catalogue-and-ordering/downloads/

 

The O class is on my to-do list for my DLJC layout, I also have the Worsley works etches.

 

Jan

Edited by Jan W
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3 hours ago, Valentin said:

Could anyone help in  identifying the the two identical components marked with an asterisk in the photographs below (front and back view of the etch)? They are part of an Worsley Works scratch-aid kit for a SER Class O engine.

 

 

 

 

It might be best to ask Allen Doherty. He's always very helpful, I've found.

 

Nig H

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Just had a look at mine I built a while back. It is the sliding door on the tender to stop the flow of coal. No idea why there are 2 though.

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On 17/08/2019 at 17:51, Gareth Collier said:

Just had a look at mine I built a while back. It is the sliding door on the tender to stop the flow of coal. No idea why there are 2 though.

I think Allen just likes to fill up space with spares of some of the parts. 

 

Nig H

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Hi chaps,

 

I'm a consultant by day job and have had the luck of being based within commuting distance for the last eighteen months or so, but the next block is four months based in Leicester. Along with a bundle of other things I can catch up on I thought it might be a good opportunity to do some modelling. I've got a nice little setup at home, but I'm not sure whether a 'travel workshop' is even a thing - and if so, what I should reasonably expect to be able to pull off. Any thoughts or opinions would be gladly appreciated!

 

 

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I would suggest that assembling wagon kits would be the way to go.  put together a small toolkit with what you normally use, including a soldering iron if they're etched kits.  Ideally do one before you go and note all the tools you find you use for that.

 

Jim

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As well as the tools, you might want to take a set of various working surfaces to protect the desk or table you'll be working on (small piece of plywood for filing and soldering etches and making simple positioning jigs, small sheet of softish metal for cutting etch tabs with a blade, small silicone mobile-phone-repair pad for soldering on, small cutting mat for working with plastic) and make sure you have a good adjustable, rechargeable LED light. A wooden block to hold flux or solvent bottles, a soft brush for sweeping up dust, and a cardboard or plastic box or two to keep all your stuff all help avoid housekeeping arguments/unfortunate accidents. A table vice is not necessary for wagon kits, a hand vice and parallel pliers are more useful, or a hold-and-fold, but I guess you would need a table vice if making a loco chassis. Some people make work trays (PD Bryon described on in the Feb 1971 mag) with a slide for a Bergeon-style demountable watchmaker's vice.

 

There are various articles on portable toolkits on the 2mmSA Magazine backnumber CD ... Andrew Webster wrote a couple in 2003 and 2004 which may give some ideas. Like you he went away consulting for months at a time. He said modelling "spared him the desire to drink himself insensible after a long day with intolerable people" which I can certainly identify with ...

 

regards

Graham

Edited by Graham R
Explaining wot Magazine I was talking about ...
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I made a small portable workbench to fit in an old brief case

post-8525-0-74552600-1391162909_thumb.jpgpost-8525-0-62949000-1391162925_thumb.jpg

 

I have used it to build stuff on a train, in the motorhome or staying somewhere.

Its a iece of Melamine with ply sides and back.

 

Don

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Hi all.

I've purchased a Worsley Works GWR 42xx kit, but it came with no instructions at all. Most if it is pretty intuitive, but it doesn't seem particularly friendly to split-chassis construction; I dont see how the entire body won't be a short, and the frame itself is etched as one fold up piece. Is this designed for wheelback wipers and insulated bushings for the axles? 

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21 minutes ago, WM183 said:

Hi all.

I've purchased a Worsley Works GWR 42xx kit, but it came with no instructions at all. Most if it is pretty intuitive, but it doesn't seem particularly friendly to split-chassis construction; I dont see how the entire body won't be a short, and the frame itself is etched as one fold up piece. Is this designed for wheelback wipers and insulated bushings for the axles? 

 

Worsley Works etches are explicitly sold as "scratch building aids" - Allen Doherty who designs then makes it clear that they might not contain everything you need to create a complete model, and some ingenuity might be required to work around making the design work. Allen's main market seems to be 3mm scale, so it may well have been designed with components for that scale in mind, then just re-scaled for 2mm scale - so things like bearing holes might not be the right size. 

 

If this is your first 2mm Scale loco kit, I'd definitely recommend you do one, or even several, of the simpler Association etched loco chassis kits (if you're interested in the GWR, the kit for the Farish 57xx would be a good start). Personally I'm on my third Association loco chassis kit, and while I've learned from each one when working on the next, I still have to do a lot of fault finding to get them working. I've also bought some Worsley Works kits, and some other etched loco kits, but I won't be tackling those until I'm confident of being able get a simpler loco chassis right first time.

 

Sorry not to have a more positive answer, but I don't think there is any way around needing to work up to a kit like this.

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Hi WM183,

 

I did wonder if you realised the "scratch aid" nature of the Worsley Works kits when you posted earlier about your purchase.

 

There are plenty of built examples in a variety of scales to show the Worsley Works etches can be used to produce a good model but they are far away from being kits.

 

I use the chassis sides and cut out the connecting centre brass, then either double sided PCB (the association shop sells some) or brass strip using the thin (0.25mm) double sided PCB from the likes of Eileen's Emporium can form the frame spacers.

 

I also recommend checking the etches thoroughly, sometimes Allen does not represent everything (valve covers on the front and rod splashers being a couple of examples I've come across).

Better to plan these into the build now.

 

I'm not meaning to sound critical of the Worsley Works product and the etches give a good head start on having to cut everything out from scratch, I have a couple of their coaches and locos at various stages of completion and I am happily contemplating more.

 

Good luck with the build, there is plenty of experience on the forum to help if you need it.

 

 

 

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