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22 hours ago, geoff west said:

Maybe a bit early for your period, but 47 361 Wilton Endeavour was a regular through Didcot in 96 / 97

A Tinsley engine at the time  It was in a very sorry looking state in its very faded RFD livery. It would make a fun model to try and replicate.

 

Geoff.


Thanks Geoff, great shout! 

 

I only saw 47361 in its later Freightliner grey guise but have always admired its previous tatty RFD colours in pictures, especially the part on one side where there’s a ghosting of some BR arrows and it’s large bodyside numbers from the blue days poking through the grey, that would be a blast to model! Definitely a fun one for the ‘to do’ list one day!!

 

Cheers,

James

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As a quick cheeky plug I’ve put together another feature for Railways Illustrated - this time on some of my ever-growing Virgin CrossCountry Class 47 fleet!

 

1F98C062-A125-4427-AB76-4485A20ECFE9.jpeg.39e1e08ca2b8bc653dbd0569d236feb9.jpeg

It’s in the latest October 2020 issue available online or “from all good newsagents” as the saying goes :lol:

I could literally bang on for hours about the glory days of the VXC 47s so it’s fun to do it in a glossy magazine..! 

 

Cheers,

James

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On ‎19‎/‎08‎/‎2020 at 22:02, James Makin said:

Back to the toy trains!

 

50245661726_ff446af607_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Joining the fleet this week is heavyweight Trainload Coal stalwart 37894.

 

50245640371_571b773f0b_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

As touched on during previous projects, I adore the former Trainload colours of BR with their gorgeous sector flashes intact, but modelling the late 1990s means that I often have to make do with the mouldy leftover crumbs on the table, with the very best ones being either withdrawn, chopped or splashed into new colour schemes!

 

37894 was one of an elite band of '37's that wore Trainload Coal livery until the bitter end, and so had long attracted my attention for tackling at some stage - and now was the time. 

 

50245020543_33ffe01752_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The starting point was a 37796 Trainload Coal body purchased from Bachmann spares department to go on a cheap chassis I'd picked up from East Kent Models at a show last year - making for a nice bargain-basement project!

 

50245862537_90f82a6bfd_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Many detail changes needed to be made to the body to convert it from the split-headcode to the centre-box '37894, including new ends plugged in (sold by Rainbow Railways), roof horns added, styrene cantrail grille divider bars and the roof detailing being changed to suit the arrangement on the prototype loco. Shawplan's Extreme Etching roof grille was the final touch.

 

50245654436_ed3e552998_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Accompanied by some Lana, weathering started in earnest, the loco being in fairly clean condition, but with build up of dirt and rusty deposits in the grille areas. Brown paints and washes were applied to the body and wiped off in a vertical motion to leave dirt accumulated in the recesses on the body. 

 

50245009823_82561605ef_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Shades applied included washes of Humbrol's 186, 113 and 251 built up from light to dark.

 

50245006018_c0da843ac6_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

37894's livery was also featured a number of paint chips, damages and rust spots, these were added on each side and yellow ends matched to prototype pics from 1998, using fine 00000 paintbrushes, essential tools in the modelling arsenal!

 

50245850847_8bfd5df052_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

One of the fun parts of the project was recreating the rusty scars left behind after the corporate BR arrows were removed from the cabsides, my method of recreating this being simply to use a leftover etched BR arrow and apply a bit of paint to the back of it, and press in place - essentially a metallic form of primary school potato printing!

 

50245849657_4cbb102f28_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The traffic weathering was applied with an airbrush, my usual mix of Phoenix shades from track dirt, frame dirt and then on the roof, various shades of 'roof dirt' and 'dirty black' before the finishing touch being a custom darker grey mixed with dark blue for the oily deposits in the exhaust grime.

 

Grilles were drybrushed with Humbrol Metalcote Gunmetal (27004) and then rubbed to highlight the grille detail. Each nose end grille was rusted to match the prototype pics and it's interesting to see how these weather on the different 37s!

 

50245849102_2d4bbb9b53_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The real 37894 led an interesting life, being a longtime Welsh loco since the mid '80s, working out of Cardiff Canton for Trainload Coal and Petroleum sectors before being assigned to Transrail where thankfully it did not gain the infamous 'Big T' stickers! Under EWS ownership, the loco had a couple of French holidays in 1999 and 2004, before final repatriation and being left to rot, sadly meeting it's maker in 2008 by European Metal Recyling of Kingsbury. 

 

50245639516_4c0a2f4ec3_k.jpg37894 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

I'm so glad to have a Coal 37 in the fleet, it's been a long time coming! Although being a relative rarity in my chosen late 90s era, the famous black diamonds will be a very welcome change from the forlorn plain triple grey and shiny EWS locos!

 

Cheers,

James

Lovely work on these coal 37s James

,ive been doing few of these too on the workbench..

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Nice work James !

I too always found the 58's strangely appealing, probably because me and my Dad used to go to Doncaster every Wednesday night, so we saw most, if not all, of them before they even ventured out onto the network. :lol:

I can't really justify a model for the era & area I concentrate on, which explains why I've only got one........:P

 

Cheers,

Phil.

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1 hour ago, James Makin said:

Here is the last model of the batch!

 

50352709293_2833ef61f2_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

I've always had a soft spot for the Class 58s and this one is very special indeed! Joining the fleet is of course, 58014 Didcot Power Station.

 

50353408886_af32325379_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Some years ago Hattons were doing a clearance sale on the Heljan Class 58 - £50 a pop and I bought a pair, the first one below in grey eventually being turned out as 58017 Eastleigh Depot, with the blue one being pugged away until now. 

 

50352696233_b6cef4ea48_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Looking very garish in it's bright blue factory colours, it was crying out to be properly weathered down!

 

To start with, some changes were made to reflect 58014, the Heljan orange warning line being moved further down onto the bodyside doors, renumbering with Fox Transfers, before being named using Brian's superb Shawplan Extreme Etchings nameplates.

 

50352689948_45da999142_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

After the usual coating of Humbrol matt varnish and being left to harden, the model was attacked with a variety of dark browns and greys. Weathering was greatly assisted by some early '80s Italian disco, perfect vintage for Class 58 projects!

 

50352678468_b09c34caa5_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Once the colours were wiped down with cotton buds soaked in enamel thinners, the bright Mainline blue colours were sufficiently muted and darker areas could be built up in the many panel gaps on the loco, and the frequent build up of oily dirt around the base of the doors too!

 

50353530782_576e71aca1_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The Heljan model was missing the visible 'crosses' on the main side grilles so these were added using neat paint, being masked off and applied to fill in some of the grille gaps.

 

50353528667_a8dd61bf57_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

One of the fun novelties with the Heljan 58s is the bufferbeam details are already applied, not a lot of work to do! My usual little metal hoop was added at one end so it can eventually be hauling trains - normally EWS 'Enterprise' or aggregate type jobs by my modelling period rather than classic MGR coal trains!

 

It almost goes without saying but the Didcot Power Station plates are the whole reason for modelling the loco..!

 

50353366021_3b306bc056_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Back in the early 1990s when travelling to visit the family in Didcot, in the back of the car on the A34, there would always be a very strong competition with my sisters to be the first one to see the tips of the infamous chimneys and much like a game of bingo, at the very top of the voice, the winner would have to shout 'Didcot Power Station'!!

 

50353522542_50dfe2430e_k.jpg58014 by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The real loco would soldier on until withdrawal in November 2000, and eventual scrapping in 2010, being amongst the first batch to be chopped up at European Metal Recycling of Kingsbury. 

 

This project brings the latest batch of locos to a conclusion, with the workbench attention having now shifted back to some exciting work on wagons over the summertime, of which updates will come in due course!

 

Cheers,

James

Hi James, great work, I’ve done loads of these but only the one in mainline- 050 - want to do another now!you’ve done a cracking job on it, cheers Jerry

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Hi James,

 

I saw the magazine article, then realised your interest in Didcot Parkway - my local!

 

Your weathering is really impressive and I spent some time looking over your choice of models and whether I had seen them there myself.  The realistic nature of your weathering brought back many memories though especially one specific memory of 37684 'St Blaise Church...' stabled next to the station with really tatty nameplate and heavily worn paintwork as well as rust.  Perhaps a contender, though I am not sure of the year?

 

Perhaps the only loco named after the yard as far as I know - 37692 'Didcot Yard' in flint grey with coal sector branding and a painted on unofficial nameplate... now there would be one to see!  I believe it was around in 2004 but not sure when I first saw it at Didcot.

 

Keep up the great work - I'm hoping to try to learn to do such things myself, so it's good to see what can be done with lots of experience.

 

Cheers,

Ixion.

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1 hour ago, 97403_Ixion said:

Hi James,

 

I saw the magazine article, then realised your interest in Didcot Parkway - my local!

 

Your weathering is really impressive and I spent some time looking over your choice of models and whether I had seen them there myself.  The realistic nature of your weathering brought back many memories though especially one specific memory of 37684 'St Blaise Church...' stabled next to the station with really tatty nameplate and heavily worn paintwork as well as rust.  Perhaps a contender, though I am not sure of the year?

 

Perhaps the only loco named after the yard as far as I know - 37692 'Didcot Yard' in flint grey with coal sector branding and a painted on unofficial nameplate... now there would be one to see!  I believe it was around in 2004 but not sure when I first saw it at Didcot.

 

Keep up the great work - I'm hoping to try to learn to do such things myself, so it's good to see what can be done with lots of experience.

 

Cheers,

Ixion.


Thanks so much, that’s very kind!

 

Got to love Didcot and good to hear you’re a local! I’m from the sunny south coast but having family there inevitably meant numerous visits and from the late ‘90s onwards, the prospect of being allowed to stray off unaccompanied and walk down from the Ladygrove estate to the station for a quick hour or two’s spotting was the highlight of any visit! 
 

There’s so many good 37s that visited Didcot! As you mentioned, 37674 ‘St Blaise Church’ is definitely one for the hitlist, I’m tending to model the late 90s and the loco came to Didcot a few times then so it’d fit in nicely with its tatty plates! 37692 would be awesome to model with its unique dark grey livery but sadly a little too ‘late’ for my modelling period so would be one that got away though!

 

There’s a few more 37s I kept seeing which have got to be modelled some day, dreary plain triple-grey 37676 kept turning up, as did the repeatedly re-named ‘school’ 37717, revised-EWS heavyweight 37712 and 37503 in original EW&S colours with gorgeous snowploughs!
 

Alongside that was many tatty 47s and oodles of fairly anonymous Class 60s, most often I’d turn up on a grey drizzly Sunday afternoon to be greeted with a wall of grey, unnamed, unbranded 60s!

 

The best part for me was always the HSTs, just hearing those Valentas screaming flat out through the station at 125 was the reason it left such a mark on my young self and why I kept begging parents and relatives for just another hour more down the station..! :lol:

 

I’m hoping I can do it justice, I’ll likely setup another thread once layout progress has got that far, but you can see the stock taking shape through these pages until then!

 

Cheers,

James

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Hi James,

Looking good as usual James, I'm lining up a 58 for my next project - appropriately enough 58014 Didcot Power Station. I spent most of my time at Didcot a few years before you, but regularly travelled through during your period. One of my favorites to look for was this chap: 

08947.150198

(from Flickr - not my picture)

I often saw this around 1998/99. Sometimes at Didcot, and at least once at Swindon (must have been a night time journey!). At some later point somebody scrawled 'Didcot Taxis' and a phone number high up on the bonnet.

I'll try to do it justice one day!

Rich

 

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On 29/10/2020 at 15:04, Rich Papper said:

Hi James,

Looking good as usual James, I'm lining up a 58 for my next project - appropriately enough 58014 Didcot Power Station. I spent most of my time at Didcot a few years before you, but regularly travelled through during your period. One of my favorites to look for was this chap: 

08947.150198

(from Flickr - not my picture)

I often saw this around 1998/99. Sometimes at Didcot, and at least once at Swindon (must have been a night time journey!). At some later point somebody scrawled 'Didcot Taxis' and a phone number high up on the bonnet.

I'll try to do it justice one day!

Rich

 


Thanks Rich, I‘m looking forward to seeing your 58 come together, ‘014 was definitely the star of the fleet haha! 


I do love the 08 there, that is a great shout to do so thanks for that! The Didcot Taxis piece is class :lol: I saw another faded blue 08 at one stage too, 08904 I think, which would be good to do, can’t beat a bit of Banger Blue! 
 

 

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The ones with the 'square' ends were the first conversions, using OCAs as a basis.

Weren't there also some dark green ones, sponsored by the Forestry Commission?

Nice job on the weathering; I did a few double-takes, as I thought they were real wagons, not models.

 

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4 hours ago, James Makin said:

Hi guys,

 

After tackling all the above locos, this year through the (first) lockdown and the Summer, I thought I'd have a bash at personalising my OTA timber wagon fleet, and now here we are!

 

50555315302_3c52ffeaf9_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

As most wagons are fairly similar in condition, instead of spending years going through and giving wagon-by-wagon updates, instead is an overall summary and a 21-wagon timber bonanza!

 

Similar to the first two tackled in the original update, all of these are from the Hornby stable, and then painted and weathered to represent various different ones seen across photos on Flickr.

 

The starting point was usually to dismantle the wagon, the wheels are fitted with Colin Craig brake discs and weathered, while attention turns to weathering the deck, the ends and the side stanchions.

 

50554444303_685920d10d_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Various Humbrol paint shades are used for the weathering, Humbrols 62, 186, 113, 133, 258 and 32 all come in handy, along with other shades of browns and greys as required. Recommended listening for all OTA weathering projects is the solo album from ex-Girls Aloud redhead Nicola Roberts (the best one really).

 

Now when it comes to OTAs, most normal people like to use it as a great reason to have fun chopping up tiny logs and running loaded trains, but when I did see OTAs occasionally at Didcot Yard and varying other places, more often than not they were empty, so it seemed fun to model them without loads, weather all the wagon interior and recreate the load strapping from bits of cut up masking tape.

 

50555171076_802328017f_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

There's many different colours used on the prototype, I simple painted some Tamiya tape on both sides and then when dry, slit with a craft knife to about a 1mm width (match to photos) and then glued on to the deck of the finished wagons, twisting here and there to get the often-curled appearance of the fabric straps.

 

All my Hornby OTAs were either the EWS or teal green releases, but the real things wear a coat of many colours, so here's a few of the versions I tackled:

 

50555161801_9d23a88e22_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Up first is the irresistible blue of the former Thames Board OTAs, my take on the faded livery being some of the old Railmatch 'British Steel Blue' from the Class 60s.

 

50555160301_b8bf6bcbe7_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Some of the stanchions were modelled as missing and generally weathered to a battered appearance, drybrushing browns from light to dark around the raised edges until satisfied.

 

50554424793_5601f65419_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The underframes were weathered by mottling on a mix of greys and blacks and browns, with finishing touches like the yellow axlebox covers to complete.

 

While going through pics, I spotted some OTAs with low flat ends, so did a bodged cut job on my Hornby model, to replicate these faded Railfreight red versions:

 

50555290897_63c3ddc464_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

There's extra stanchions & supports on each side too, added from various bits of styrene strip and angled plastics. The planked decks were just painted in an array of browns and greys, weathered with drybrushed greys, before the load strapping is secured on top.

 

50555154691_71ca16208a_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Next up of course is the lovely EWS versions!

 

50555285092_ddda1d6625_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

While most are very similar, I spotted variations in wagons with some having faded or repainted stanchions, while there's plenty of opportunities to have fun battering the parts clobbered by numerous logs!

 

50555287612_5c84c157b4_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The decks on the refurbished EWS versions are metal plated, and so weathered slightly differently from the wooden plank versions. 

 

50555283497_0d192fa09a_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Layers of light and dark browns and greys are mottled on, and effort gone in some cases to replicate the weathered on the flooring where the load has been sitting, or where rainwater gathers in dents on the floor, all subtle variations that can be seen in real life. Humbrol gunmetal grey is drybrushed across the floor to highlight the checkerplate texture.

 

50555144031_cf385b40f3_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The inner ends also seem to get a good battering as well by all the logs! Some of the ends are either painted in body colour, or a light grey or browns, photos show a wide variety of styles. Then, a range of browns and greys are stippled on with a large brush until the desired effect appears.

 

50555142216_16bfce2517_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Finally, I had to model some of the attractive teal coloured ones too!

 

50555266602_5864910bc0_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

The original Hornby colour is retained but changes once weathered, flattened and muted under shades of browns and rust patches.

 

50555137786_12bf47e252_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

Again, significant weathering was done to the stanchions and deck planks to get the full effect of lots of log bashing!

 

50555270777_86c04d06b9_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

It's been great fun putting these all together during the extra modelling time this Spring & Summer, and blasting through a 21 wagon-rake in just a few months is a new speed record for me so far!

 

50554393588_e9dc1942a6_k.jpgOTA Wagons by James Makin by James Makin - Account 2, on Flickr

 

As we now enter another lockdown it'll be interesting to see what gets blitzed next, I've got a stack of Parkside 'Barbel' wagon kits looking right at me..!

 

Cheers,

James 

 

Wow, James this weathering is amazing attention to detail! I especially like the chipped paint on the inner ends, you'd be streched to see if it's a model or the real thing!

 

Keep it up!

 

Jules

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello James.

 

Could I take you back, please, to your recent two Class 58s.

 

For the underframe weathering, have a mixed a colour yourself or found a suitable single Humbrol one to obtain the finish please?

 

Cheers

 

Dave

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1 hour ago, dasatcopthorne said:

Hello James.

 

Could I take you back, please, to your recent two Class 58s.

 

For the underframe weathering, have a mixed a colour yourself or found a suitable single Humbrol one to obtain the finish please?

 

Cheers

 

Dave


Hi Dave!

 

I’ve used a variety of shades to build up the finished effect, firstly the whole chassis was painted Humbrol 32 dark grey (as backup to avoid exposing black plastic in case any top coat weathering gets knocked off in handling/exhibition ‘shunting’!) and then I’ll run airbrush coats over of Phoenix’s weathering shades, their ‘brake dust’, ‘track dirt’ and ‘dirty black’ shades to finish. 
 

Hope this helps! I’ve got some more 58s sitting in boxes so I’ll have to tackle these soon and will get some more pics as they progress!

 

Cheers,

James

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On 17/09/2020 at 22:33, Squirrel Rail said:

Hi James, great work, I’ve done loads of these but only the one in mainline- 050 - want to do another now!you’ve done a cracking job on it, cheers Jerry

My 58 envy has subsided- not blue but 033 with the high body stripe- look forward to your next one!BE184BE2-C3E3-4367-B2B0-1D740736CB34.jpeg.9ec739a93bb9160b1b5497cfcc4190d1.jpeg

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