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Having purchased a Ruston 48DS from Mike & Judith Edge last Sunday and having a few days off work I decided to tackle this kit, and post a few photos, which I hope may be of interest to some viewers.

Firstly virtual everything you need is in the box including motor, wheels and a Highlevel four wheel drive gear box kit.

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I have been pretty good in following the instructions, building the inner chassis first.

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There are two swinging arms that allow for a rocking back axle. I have pivoted these using a couple of brass pins. Note the presence of the lower frame spacer (Part 3).

I then folded up the Highlevel Rustler gearbox and tried to fit to the chassis.

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What I found was that the lower frame spacer prevented the Rustler from fitting in place so I have removed it.

When fitting the central support for the rocking axle I should have done this job with the axle in place using teporarily installed bushes in the inner chassis back axle holes.

This I did not so may be the reason I had to remove the lower spacer.

With the outer chassis etch folded, and the 12BA nuts soldered in place, the next job was to fold and fit the buffer beams. I chose the deep buffer beams.

The buffer beam with the cutouts fits on the front.

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This is the rear buffer beam. What I found after fitting the bushes for the buffer housing was that I had to take them out and file about 0.5mm off as shown in the picture so that it fits properly between the frame supports. I also found that I had to file a little bit off the top so the bush sat snuggly under the top fold.

The next job was to fit a draw hook to the buffer. This item I could not find on the etch so have fitted a Kean Maygib wagon hook made up from two laminations, and a plate (Not prototypical but made it easier to fit the hook.).

Both buffer beams now fitted.

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The next job was fitting the chassis overlays and the laminations for the axle boxes. The chassis overlay went on easily. Doing the axle boxes which is another two layers of small etched squares tested my patience a little, but managed without loosing any of the bits.

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This as far as I have got.

Gordon A

Bristol

Edited by Gordon A
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Nice one, Gordon. I'll be watching this with interest as I want one of these, having seen one on the JE stand at a show earlier this year. It has to be the best 48DS kit ever produced in 4mm.

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Further work on the Ruston commencing with embossing the rivets on the front of the engine casing as well as the cab front and back.

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The next job was to attach the grill to the back of front of the engine casing, and a rear bulkhead of the engine casing to the cab front.

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The fitting of the cab front took a bit of head scratching. In the end I fixed the superstructure base with two pins, then used a square, a prallel block, a six inch steel ruler and a small rare earth magnet to set the cab front square.

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What is noticeable in the above picture is that the 14BA screws are quite proud, so I have cut off the screws in the cab.

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Gordon A

Bristol

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The next job was to add the cab doors. There are two ears with holes that line up with the top holes for the external handrails. I have opted to fit a couple of temporary 0.4mm wire pegs to assist in alignment.

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The first door I got away with drilling one hole in a piece of plywood to ensure the pins were upright. This did not work for the second door so I ended up drilling both holes using the door as a template, then soldering the temporary wire pegs.post-7071-0-68729700-1336656117_thumb.jpg

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After adding the doors to the relevant sides (Hole for the door handle to the rear)I lloked to fit the part cab floors.

I filed down a piece of scrap etch to act as a support for the floor parts so that they would sit level.

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Having fitted both sides and part floors I looked at fitting the cab back.

To aid in fitting the back flush with the ends of the sides I tacked to straight pieces of scrap etch accross the back.

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Then fitted the cab back between the sides.

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Hmmm that does not look quite right!

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  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

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Since the last picture showing a badly fitting cab back I have been doing a bit of tweeking.

For tweeking read remove the back buffer beam, remove the buffers and tweek the bend on top until parallel with bottom edge and refit buffers.

Tack back in position and find that the cab back is slightly pit. Remove cab back and refit with body screwed to chassis.

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A much better fit.

Gordon A

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You are supposed to build the cab and engine casing with the baseplate bolted to the platform. Your comment about the central spacer noted - I think the production "Rustler" may be slightly different to the one I used in the test etch. I'll check it when I build another one.

Michael Edge

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Right lets have another bash at this little critter.

Mike's comments are quite valid as he has designed the kit so that the body can be built on top of the outer chassis so that the two will match and not distort each other when screwed together.

However being a bit ham fisted I opted to build the body on a flat piece of plywood.

I came unstuck when fitting the cab back and ended up re-fitting it with the body screwed in place.

My next job was to shape the cab roof and the top of the engine casing / bonnet. This caused me some trepidation as I found the brass a bit on the hard side and had never shaped / rolled a piece of brass to a predetermined shape before.

This is where belonging to a friendly group helps out and the skills of Mark Humphrey. One Tuesday evening Mark gave a few of us an impromptue demonstration rolling and forming the cab roof and bonnet top for me.

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I then decided to deviate from Mike's instructions by adding the detailed sides to the bonnet.

Next I had to fold the sides down to create the basic shape of the bonnet.

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After some thinking while commuting to and from work, I opted to use pieces of aluminium angle from B&Q, which by chance was 25mm x 15mm. One face had a layer of 1/8 inch cork stuck to it to protect the 1/2 etch detail.

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By chance 15mm appeared to be the right height to start folding the top over relative to the side.

I am fairly happy with the dry run fitting the front to the wrapper.

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I thik a little tweeking and a bit of solder will give me a reasonable fit.

Mike's instructions refer to greasing the top of the outer chassis to prevent inadvertantly soldering the body to the chassis. I tried vaseline and managed to get it everywhere. After washing the vaseline off I fitted a paper gasket in its place, which has the same effect (I have trial fitted the bonnet and removed it four times so far!).

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You will also note that I have left the etched components in the bonnet base to give a bit more support to the two thin sides of the base.

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Having folded the bonnet and tweeked it to as good a fit with the front end assembly that I was going to achieve I tacked the parts together and went for a dry run with the rest of the model.

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A bit more tweeking to improve the fit then I soldered the bonnet assembly together.

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This is the point where I realised that by not following Mike's instructions I had made life a bit difficult for myself!

Mike's instructions tell you to fit the door / side etches after the bonnet has been fixed to the cab base assembly. The reason being that he has made some holes in the side through which to poke your soldering iron to assist with the assembly sequence.

I considered that I had two options;

a)Remove the cab back to feed the soldering iron into the casing / bonnet. Which I did not want to do.

B) Solder the casing / bonnet from the under side. This was the prefered option.

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With the aid of two pieces of wooden coffe stirer and a cheap plastic clamp, and after two attempts with additional tweeking I was satisfied with the end product.

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The roof and detailed bits are next.

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I have attached a picture of some of the tools I have used.

The two pieces of plywood, the piece of 1/8 inch cork and the wooden clothes peg are used to hold components in place while sodering, and saving my fingers from being singed.

The small jewellers screwdriver is not only used for the 14BA screws, but after a few strokes on a wet stone is an ideal tool for removing excess solder.

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Having been busy attending various exhibitions and putting some time in at my local heritage railway I have finally got some time to add some more parts to the Ruston 48DS.

My last task was fitting the cab roof. I had bent the sides down but was not quite happy with the fit. After showing Mike E my efforts at the Wigan show and acting on his advice I now have a better fitting roof.

While at Bitton I took a couple of pictures of the partially restored 48DS that has returned to site to show how the roof fitted to the cab.

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I decided to tackle assembling the two derail beams. I found two pictures by Adrian Booth on this web site http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/jasrowlands/ruston/48ds1.htm#48ds_menu) showing what looks like two 48DS with a deep buffer beams fitted with derail beams, and a third that may have been fitted..

I found the 90º folds difficult even with further weakening of the half etch fold line.

Also the fact that there are two rivets on each upright makes the folding a bit on the fiddly side. Adding the milled brass angle to mounting brackets was made easier by using a cut down Twinky hair grip as a clamp.

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After a couple of attempts I ended up with the de rail beams assembled.

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I will mount these later on.

Fitting the handles to the bonnet was fairly straight forward.

The cab steps were next on my list. After looking at pictures on the net I decided to fold up the outer edges. I am not sure if Mike E intended for this in his etched steps. After a few false starts I found the easiest way was to scribe the fold line on the ½ etched brass, then fold using small pliers.

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It took me a few goes to get the folds to my satisfaction, which has left them looking slightly bashed.

The steps are mounted on the strip on the bottom of the main frame so I added a scrap of etch on the back to space the top away from the frame.

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A question - the handles that you've put on the engine compartment sides - are these in the kit and its instructions? It's just that I have never seen, either in life or photographs, handles on the folding doors.

 

They should be small turnbuckle type catches.

Edited by Ruston

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Well the holes are definitely etched in - you can see the pictures up the thread, but I note the example on the Judith Edge website shows only these holes with nothing inserted - which actually seems to represent this quite well relative to prototype pictures - http://www.ukmodelshops.co.uk/judithedge/kit/371

 

Whether this is in the instructions I wouldn't like to say...

 

Adam

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Nothing in the instructions regarding handles on the bonnet side doors.

On the prototype there are little 'turnkeys' that fit in slots and hold the doors in place, these are quite small and woudn't be worth fitting in 4mm scale - and they're often missing (lost) on the prototype anyway. Which is why I can't find a decent pic. of one in my gallery!

Edited by halfwit

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Ouch, I dropped a clanger there!!!

I will have to remove the handles and see what I can do about the residule holes.

Hmmmmm???

 

Thanks chaps.

 

Oh well Stafford tomorrow should be a nice day so I can put decisions and research off untill Sunday.

 

Gordon A

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I didn't think I needed to tell people not to put something on the loco, yes they are just supposed to be holes. In a similar vein I was shown a very good build of our Hunslet 15" 0-6-0ST at a recent exhibition. I queried the beading on the outside of the cab opening to be told that the builder had added it as it was missing. I had to point out that there is no beading on the outside of these Hunslet cabs - it's on the inside.

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I should have followed the basic rule of checking photographs as well as looking at Mike’s drawings so I have no excuse, well apart from running up and down stairs from loft room to rear room looking at the pictures of the foot steps.

I misinterpreted mikes drawing of the slots as handles - my mistake.

(Mike - A note in the instructions that they are slots not handles might be an idea?)

I have been cogitating as to my skill level versus leaving the handles. The handles have won as I do not think I have the skill to fill the holes and remake 3 consistent slots on each side.

If any one asks it is the owner’s modification some time after buying!

Thanks for the comments chaps.

Am I cracking up? I thought someone had posted a nice side on shot of the 48DS at the Chacewater Railway on this thread?

Hopefully I will return to this project on Sunday after spending Saturday at Camrail in Bradford-on-Avon.

Gordon A

Bristol

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Halfwit,

Many thanks for the link to your gallery.

I will peruse the photographs this week.

 

Gordon A

Bristol

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Ouch, I dropped a clanger there!!!

I will have to remove the handles and see what I can do about the residule holes.

Hmmmmm???

 

Thanks chaps.

 

Oh well Stafford tomorrow should be a nice day so I can put decisions and research off untill Sunday.

 

Gordon A

 

This might help - taken today. The catch is shown in the vertical, ie released, position. When closed it will be horizontal but you wouldn't then be able to read the ruler against it! This is actually a 16/20HP 2ft gauge loco with the lift-up side panels totally removed for access to the engine but the same clips are used on 48DS standard gauge locos. Possibly best made with fine wire in 4mm scale round a shaped former to ensure consistency.

 

P1010940.JPG

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At last I have some time to continue.

I have turned my attention to the gearbox / two axle drive.

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Above is the etched parts folded and assembled with the gears waiting to be fitted.

The next three shots show the majority of the gears less the two final drive spurs and the motor worm assembly.

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I then carried out a trial fit of the drive unit. The clearances are tight, so I decided to add two strips of 2mm x 2mm brass angle on the outside of the chassis providing extra reinforcing. This enabled me to file some of the inside top flange away making it easier to fit the drive unit.

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The above picture shows the 2mm x 2mm angle fitted.

 

The next two pictures show (black marker) where I have filed away two sections of the top inside flange to make it easier to fit the power unit.

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The final pictures show the drive unit fitted in the chassis.

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So far the assmbly looks OK.

I have some concern as the mesh of the gears is tight. I am not sure if it is just one gear or more than one. I may have to strip the gears out and reassemble.

Hey-ho two steps forward one back.

 

Gordon A

Bristol

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Having posted the last lot of pictures had some tea and watched a bit of telly I decided to retire to the loft and remove the gears from the drive system to try and identify the cause of the tightness. This did not take too long. The culprits were the two 18 tooth idler gears in the swinging arm. They were a good fit on their short shafts causing quite a bit of resisitance. I carefully reamed the gears so that they would spin on the shaft but were not a sloppy fit.

Having sorted my problem with the gears I fitted the 4-WD unit to the chassis, dropped the footplate on top followed by the body.

The body would not sit down on the foot plate.

The problem turned out to be the swing arm.

As you will see in the next two pictures the swing arm sits about 2 mm proud of the running plate.

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The problem was the former / back bulkhead (20) of the engine bonnet.

The fix was to remove the bar across the bottom of the back bulkhead (20) and file / grind the lower left hand side about 5mm from the bottom and flush to the inside of the bonnet.

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Problems cured. Time to have a swill off and go for a couple of pints.

 

Sunday I tackled one of the fiddliest jobs I have experienced on this kit - fitting the builders plates if you are intending to solder them in place. This job took most of Sunday morning and afternoon (After visiting the pub for a roast dinner.)

I think in retrospect that it would be easier to fit the builders plates as the first assembly job using a high temprature solder. I also fitted the cab hand rails.

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Just the brakes and the resin detail pieces to fit, then remove as much suplus solder as possible, then a good clean up and spray with primer.

I still cannot make my mind up as to what the main colour will be as I already have a green and a blue small 4 wheel diesels.

Gordon A

Bristol

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The swinging arm was supposed to be inside the inner frames. I'll be building one of these from a production etch this month (I've only built test etches so far) so I'll check the instructions as I go.

Michael Edge

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The swinging arm was supposed to be inside the inner frames. I'll be building one of these from a production etch this month (I've only built test etches so far) so I'll check the instructions as I go.

Michael Edge

 

From the instructions: 'For the wider gauges another option is to put the swinging arms outside the frames'

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Chaps,

Can anyone provide me with a sketch of the brake rigging on a 48DS please.

I have been through Halfwits 48DS gallery but still cannot work how the brakes were actuated.

Many thanks

Gordon

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Having found a picture of a 48DS with a deep buffer beam and fitted with derail bars on

http://myweb.tiscali...uston/48ds2.htm "48DS w/n 458961 of 1962, at Underwood's of Droitwich. This loco has the final style of cab and the deep buffer beams", in a photograph by Adrian Booth, I decided to fit mine accordingly.

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To do this I had to file flat the four rounded bolt heads that I had pushed out when initially assembling the buffer beams.

Next job on my list was the brake shoe and hangars. This caused me some head scratching as I wanted to mount them prior to painting and fitting the wheels and drive system.

Chatting to Mike E at Scaleforum I understand that he fits these parts after fitting the drive system.

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You should note that I think I soldered the knife edge (Part 4) for the rocking axle in the wrong position. I ended up cutting a small chunk out to enable to pass a piece of wire from one side of the chassis to the other from which the rear brake shoes are hung.

I have made a set short sleeves from very small bore brass tube to act as spacers to position the brake hangar / shoes.

I then used a lightly mounted a wheel on a tapered end of a length of 2mm steel, which also has a spacer behind it to position the wheel relative to the chassis and my opted back to back dimension, to position the brake shoes.

I have filed from scrap brass and added added the short levers that protrude to the back from the rear brake shoe cross rod. These connect the brake shoes to the rest of the manual braking system.

If I was doing this again I would drill out the retaining pins of the brake shoes so I could pass the brass wire for the cross rods through from one side to the other. If the rods connecting the front and back sets were added this would enable the brake shoes to be built as a demountable sub-assembly.

The next job was mounting the sand pipes. These were made pieces of 0.3mm brass wire, initialy with two 90 degree bends, and cut over length. I put the final bends in these later.

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Having fitted the sand pipes I filed two brake operating levers to the back brake shoes (See drawing at end of instructions) from some scrap etch and added these with brass wire cross rods. A cross rod was also added to the front brake shoes as well.

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Roof and exhaust pipe next, then a wash and scrub up - the loco not me!

Gordon

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