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Steve Hewitt

Semaphore Signals - 4mm Scale (Mainly)

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2 hours ago, Steve Hewitt said:

Where a wire passes thru'  its weight bar, it is bent twice at 90 deg. 

This means the weight bar is moved by the wire when the signal is operated, but without any loss of motion. 

That's a great trick, Steve. Filed for future use.

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Amazing work Steve, always marvel at what you post here.

 Cheers 

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Some beautiful engineering there, Steve.

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What a gorgeous bracket signal and the engineering put into it still stuns me. Love the mix of corrugated and Nicholls pattern arms too.

I doff my hat to the master!:imsohappy:

JF

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Another bracket signal  -  GWR this time..............

 

This is another "square post era" model for a fictitious minor London terminus.

The off-set right hand design is required due to fit in a very restricted location.

1261623787_EdgewareRdapproachBracket.jpg.57511a753621a433f8321bc4d5c45cd7.jpg

 

The main post and integral doll will be made from a Mosokits etch.

The main arms will all be Masokits as well, but the Calling-On arms will be private Les Green etch.

The two shorter dolls will be 3D prints from Les Green's Shapeways shop, as will the Lamps, and the C/O bearing/lamp assembly.

MSE will provide the bracket work etch, modified a little.

 

RIMG0210.jpg.03265f96d3029bd1805f0ea08ff8ddda.jpg

The etched brass main post, made from two folded "U" sections soldered together.

 

Regular readers will know I like to have firm foundations for my signals, usually comprising a bespoke turning to secure the Post and ensure it is vertical to its baseplate.

It will also have the Guide Tubes for the operating wires to provide a smooth bearing and minimise buckling.

The whole is then fitted inside a brass tube which will be a good fit in the baseboard when the time comes for installation.

 

RIMG0211.jpg.eb85537f564b3a407135e177b5de93ec.jpg

The turned brass tube mounted on the baseplate.

The hole is tapered by using a cutting broach and is a very good fit on the main post.

RIMG0218.jpg.ba13e038deeb120355b0d6170ed12868.jpg

The guide tubes are clustered to the rear of the main post.

RIMG0213.jpg.7c0959d8bbd5a84709e9a03aa7aa31c0.jpg

 

The half inch dia. brass tube is a good fit on the flange of the turning.RIMG0217.jpg.804191a5ee5fe109813dda41ebf5616a.jpg

 

RIMG0219.jpg.88ffb2ea5e199161f3b6a26359e0abe7.jpg

This is the first sub-assembly.

 

RIMG0220.jpg.9563a0976b0c7c193e307b43bcf2ba35.jpg

The modified MSE etches.

The upper bracket has been drilled to eventually take the handrail stanchions.

 

 

RIMG0229.jpg.daf2da50925402e7979210c0f783ab22.jpg

The six weight bars, from Les Green etches in two bearings cut from square brass tube.

 

 

To be continued..........

 

Steve.

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Interesting! Which MSE Bracket have you used..?:blink:

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That bracket doesn't look remotely GWR.

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2 hours ago, Jon Fitness said:

Interesting! Which MSE Bracket have you used..?:blink:

Hi Jon,

 

Its the 11ft cantilever bracket, S0046.  (GN/LNER)

The motivation was the signal in Plates 44 and 45 of Adrian Vaughn's GW Signalling.

 

Steve.

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Posted (edited)
On 25/06/2020 at 23:40, Steve Hewitt said:

Hi Jon,

 

Its the 11ft cantilever bracket, S0046.  (GN/LNER)

The motivation was the signal in Plates 44 and 45 of Adrian Vaughn's GW Signalling.

 

Steve.

The one on page 43 at Swindon looks a bit nearer to it, but  I see what you mean. Does look rather odd though..

Edited by Jon Fitness

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One minor point - the word 'BAY' on GWR signal arms only ever appears to have been used on signals reading from a bay, and not on signals reading to a bay.  I've definitely never seen a photo (or indeed in years past an actual signal) which was any different from that.

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24 minutes ago, The Stationmaster said:

One minor point - the word 'BAY' on GWR signal arms only ever appears to have been used on signals reading from a bay, and not on signals reading to a bay.  I've definitely never seen a photo (or indeed in years past an actual signal) which was any different from that.

 

Thanks Mike,

 

I'll check the requirement with the railway's owner.

 

Steve.

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Putting the bits together.......

 

The main post of this signal is brass, so all the parts which can be soldered together were tackled first.

 

The two parts of the bracket were soldered to the main post followed by the staging beams.

 

RIMG0223.jpg.26ef10a36168c4a65979ef004891184a.jpg

The broach had produced a shallow taper in the base, so the post was a good fit and just required soldering at it lower end.

 

RIMG0224.jpg.1dbe7aacc86bea3edd1fe2efe1243b24.jpg

The pre-drilled holes in the top of the bracket gave a good alignment and foundation for the stations.

 

 

RIMG0228.jpg.2d0c41101ada124daefeca48941b3c4b.jpg

The stanchions will be adjusted as necessary when the handrail is added at a later stage.

 

RIMG0234.jpg.3a4bacc17e467dca3c51e9f5ab726611.jpg

The weight bars and their bearings were seen previously.

A broken HSS drill was used to ensure alignment whilst they were soldered in place.

 

RIMG0235.jpg.b10024667908dbd0a27fccf948549aec.jpg

 

I'm sorry I forgot to take pictures of the assembly of the dolls and their subsequent fitting to the brackets.

The dolls are 3D prints by Les Green, as are the Lamps, and Calling-On bearing/lamp assemblies.

These non-metalic items were assembled using either "Power Bond" cyano or a UV Light cured glue which is a new experiment for me.

This glue is fairly viscous and crystal clear. It allows careful adjustment of positions etc., before a 5sec dose of UV light from a small LED Torch which was supplied. (No good for fixing flat surfaces of opaque items, as the light has to reach all the adhesive to cure it.)

 

RIMG0236.jpg.07e3f4cb4b157f3b68dbb92ea9b9cbc1.jpg

The main "static" assembly is complete, including the Handrails, Ladders etc. and the bearings for the cranks which will connect the Down Rods.

 

RIMG0239.jpg.45f7626a0bae954bdf5285c2869460a8.jpg

Ready for a scrub and polish then a bath in Cellulose Thinners before a trip to the beauty salon.

 

 

More of which later.

 

Steve.

 

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Looks great now Steve. Coming together very nicely.

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Posted (edited)

After painting.......

 

First task is to install the Optical Fibres and terminate them in another of Les Green's 3D printed connectors.RIMG0241.jpg.ccf57c7ae11a3d199464cfe5e0daa38d.jpg

There are six fibres - one for each lamp.

They are routed through the signal structure, becoming quite unobtrusive.

 

RIMG0240.jpg.8d3bf26c9ce8c8754409c783dcd3a799.jpg

One LED then provides the light for each lamp.

RIMG0243.jpg.5fc5a75dc23dd5383ddfc043716955ca.jpg

And the Backlight where the fibres leak.

 

The other components were painted, ready for the assembly.

 

 

Weight bars, cranks etc.

 

RIMG0248.jpg.22275b6e0f6b2b329587c6d37ec8fdf9.jpg

And a whole batch of signals.

 

RIMG0249.jpg.4f6d7c16753924db3836a12860ccc020.jpg

The first three items assembled.

 

More to follow.......

 

Steve.

 

 

 

RIMG0244.jpg

Edited by Steve Hewitt
Remove surplus photo.
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Steve what period does the model represent please?  If it is GWR days - but depending on the date - the Calling On arms might be the wrong colour.  The GWR changed to the standard red/white/red colouring for Calling On arms in the 1930s - prior to that they were painted red with the letters 'CO' on the front, see my photo below.   When the arm is off the rectangular glass area of the lamp case is revealed as basically white background showing the black letter C

 

1648328932_callon.jpg.2772142090e6740df2f3b290e04704c2.jpg

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Thanks Mike,

 

This signal and previous ones for this layout have the later style Calling On arms, with the Black "C" on the extended lamp casing.

 

Steve.

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Just a quick note to say that anyone else fancy having a go at the Carmarthen signal referred to might like to know that S008/3 from Wizard Models is probably closer to the prototype bracket, just needs some minor modification.

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Posted (edited)

The servos...............

The servo mounts:

There are six servos to mount for this signal, one for each arm.

I always prepare a bespoke mount for my signal.

They are made from plywood and designed to locate accurately with the signal operating wires.

A piece of plywood is cut on the bandsaw and drilled for the servo fixing screws.

 

RIMG0265.jpg.795aea77205cc9dcc686c32522ade0a4.jpg

 

Once the servos are in place, the sub-assembly is mounted on another piece of plywood which will eventually secure the whole to the underside of the baseboard.

This second piece has a hole to match that in the baseboard and the signal's foundation tube. 

The relationship of the plywood parts is determined by " rack of the eye" to ensure the operating wires can be linked to the servo "horns".

The joints are reinforced with beading, the whole being glued together.

 

RIMG0267.jpg.954182b13c1fd53430ce995fd2d2fd7d.jpg

 

Off cuts of ply and MDF are glued together to create the Transport & Test Frame.

This represents the layout's baseboard for thickness, and facilitates the assembly process and testing of the signal.

It also allows the signals to be transported safely, tested for operation and easily transferred to the layout.

RIMG0268.jpg.9d372091e8acad807546c7d43055728b.jpg

 

The signal is located by its brass foundation tube, and secured by friction only.

 

RIMG0270.jpg.4a5a594c7f2343a78b94c000f95054f6.jpg

The relationship of the operating wires and servos can be seen here.

 

RIMG0272.jpg.953f11d91f16a92dc68f79aa23aa3b9e.jpg

The operating wires are 0.4mm dia Nickel Silver.

The lower portion, from ground level downwards, is fixed into 1.32in dia brass tube.

This helps to prevent buckling, and is a good running fit inside the "guide tubes" which are built into the signal base (seen previously).

 

 

More brass tube, of 1/16in dia is used to link the operating wires to their servos. This slides over the operating wire, and is soldered to it once the relationship is adjusted.

Each one is made to fit, and is a simple push fit into the servo horn.

 

RIMG0274.jpg.fc8be4d8736acc001c8eb2447eda5d8a.jpg

One of the links between operating wire and servo horn.

 

RIMG0275.jpg.ff5460efe9806a4d5bb4ba6503834017.jpg

The servo horn has been shortened and the fixing holes opened up to 1/16in dia to fit.

The intention is to use the maximum amount of angular motion to move the signal. This giving the best control.

 

RIMG0276.jpg.535441bb8936496f411328f93fa076c4.jpg

Using the "safe" feature of the GF Controller, the servo is locked in its mid-position.

With the connecting tube still free to slide on the operating wire, the signal arm is adjusted to a corresponding mid position - neither clear nor danger.

 

RIMG0278.jpg.7df7178558352bb336427723ab8b565d.jpg

You can just see a small nick in the tube to facilitate soldering.

Liquid flux, a hot iron with a little solder and its all over very quickly.

 

RIMG0280.jpg.3ac5a7fac14848fc83ce6d81ba771b1a.jpg

Each signal arm and servo are dealt with similarly.

 

 

The GF Controller for each arm will be adjusted and the whole signal given a good testing......................

 

Steve.

Edited by Steve Hewitt
Spelling correction.
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You make it sound so easy, but it is not, it takes real craftsmanship to make it work smoothly. My signals are still static 5 years after starting them for that reason. 
 

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Hi Steve,

Thanks for the inspirational thread and for your and Les’ specific advice via pm. I thought you might like to see the latest signal I have built for ‘Aylesbury’ - https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/24951-modelling-aylesbury-station-risborough-district-mrc/


This is a two doll bracket with an elevated shunt signal:-
 

A21ADCFB-259E-461A-9E4C-5171AE933807.jpeg.dcfc76f46888bd61630d27fd78d3856a.jpeg

 


05545395-EDA1-46BD-9274-EFDB2574CD4A.jpeg.83a122b0aa445c02195515eadfd3ebe7.jpeg

 

Roy

 

 

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4 hours ago, Lord Nelson said:

Hi Steve,

Thanks for the inspirational thread and for your and Les’ specific advice via pm. I thought you might like to see the latest signal I have built for ‘Aylesbury’ - https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/24951-modelling-aylesbury-station-risborough-district-mrc/


This is a two doll bracket with an elevated shunt signal:-
 

A21ADCFB-259E-461A-9E4C-5171AE933807.jpeg.dcfc76f46888bd61630d27fd78d3856a.jpeg

 


05545395-EDA1-46BD-9274-EFDB2574CD4A.jpeg.83a122b0aa445c02195515eadfd3ebe7.jpeg

 

Roy

 

 

That looks great Roy, if any is interested in the brackets that support the post let me know as I can 3D print these for a small cost.

IMG_6848.jpg

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