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The key to the re-development of what was East Yard and its re-incarnation as Jubillee Yard I did by forming a new entry and taking off a slice of Hintock Dairies yard, and removing a building.  I was then able to put in two longer sidings..

 

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This is the finished subject: WH Lee's premises are the combination of two buildings already on the site and date back to the 1970's, both serving me well. W H Lee is a Wheelwright and Carter who handles the coal required by the adjacent Dairy. Hence the coal wagons on the siding.  Next comes the aptly named Ashgrove's, who make furniture and manufacture helves greatly used in agriculture and the stone working industry on Portland and Purbeck and in the surrounding counties. They need a van or two each week for their goods. The top half of this structure is the displaced building from the Dairy, the lower half a new build.

 

Across the back there are Victoria a new build, and Albert Terraces. In front is the Yard Office.  To the right is the back side of a previous building of Hooper and Wollen's, the malsters.

 

The terraces are half relief and butt up against the back scene. All others are at an angle thus avoiding the parade ground look. Entry to the yard is hidden, being along the front of H&W's premises. It took a long time to get the placement of these buildings "right" as it did the trees.

 

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A finishing touch was the post and wire fence to separate the yard from the running line.

 

All in all a satisfying piece of work. Not only does it add to the charms of Hintock and is very much a picturesque part of the whole but also adds to the operational aspects that I enjoy so much.

 

PS, as before, a right click brings these up a treat.

Edited by john flann
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John -a very nice little summary of the revamp project. You certainly have a good eye for the functional layout of land and buildings- look fab all round.

 

Excellent work for us others to wonder at...

regards, Andy R

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Gentlemen, that is most generous approbation, and AndyR, a nice compliment: we see the subject matter through not dis-similar professional eyes. It all adds so much credibility to the finished scene(s).

 

Two items of trivia: one, as I have remarked previously I invariably date buildings and other items of when they were made, there that horse and cart in the second image that lead the eye into the scene I see I built in 1966, not short of fifty years ago. The other, that the signal in the third image guarding the exit from Sheepcroft Yard is from out of my ":odds box" and probably ex Hornby Dublo. The finial on the top and that gives it extra appeal is made from a small bead with a short length of plastic rod inserted. Painted red it completes the job and is an example of those small things that add so much to the whole.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Excellent stories and pics as always John, thank you for sharing them with us, I'm looking forward to doing my own little BLT, (Trewenn) in the not to distant future now. Please keep the pics and stories coming, especially info like the dates you made things like the buildings etc.

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As you will already be aware I built Hintock to have fun and enjoy the pleasures of operating. The following is a simple little tale but illustrates how  straightforward actions as part of a larger sequence can be enjoyed.

 

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What's happening is the arrival of a local Down SR passenger train from Yeovil and the and departure of the afternoon GWR Up milk to Hintock Junction.

 

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Hintock Dairies dispatches daily in morning and afternoon, four or five full milk tanks these going either to Paddington (Old Oak) or Granby GWR.

 

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The bogie i(below) is an ex Dean corridor brake and conveys milk in churns picked up en route for Weymouth. It is marked to "Work only between Hintock and Weymouth. Return to Hintock."

 

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After the milk has left the SR M7 will run round, couple up to its train and with the van unloaded wait in the platform for the arrival of a Down GWR goods and when that snug in the loop, depart for Dorchester and Weymouth.   

 

Thank you John. Your ongoing story continues to inspire many of us, me in particular.

 

 

PB

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Thank you AndyP and PeterB for your kind comments and other gentlemen for your likes. It's all appreciated.

 

What is inspiration? One definition I believe is 1% bright idea, 99% perspiration in bringing it about. My subject matter is the everyday working of a GWR/SR branch and what more everyday in those last images than the arrival and departure of trains?

 

There my intent was to capture the spirit of it, and if that's inspiration then I'm happy to pass some of it on.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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The SR Down morning Goods has arrived in the loop......

 

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...the GWR autocoach stands in the platform and passengers assemble...

 

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...and there's a growing sense of anticipation in the air.

 

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What's next?

Edited by john flann
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I still see details that I've missed before in every picture. just lovely, I can sit and look through these all day long and not get bored, I have a few pics saved in my to do in the future and inspiration folder, and I still keep referring back to your On Line Book.

 

Thanks John.

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Andy R and Andy P, those are very kind remarks. I don't set out consciously to add detail or set up cameos. They seem to naturally evolve. After all what can you actually see unless very close up and in the model railway world we look from further distant. Detail can be overdone, I think. But those right clicks do add so much to the "detail" in and enjoyment of the images.

 

I'm glad Andy P you enjoy the ebook I'm sorry to say its been neglected over recent months because of other things, but I do intend to get on with adding new chapters and blogs to bring it up to date. Those I shall do as another project winds down. I hope too to add some more video to this thread.

 

And for you other gentlemen thank you, for the 'likes."

 

My regards.

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The SR Down morning Goods has arrived in the loop......

 

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...the GWR autocoach stands in the platform and passengers assemble...

 

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...and there's a growing sense of anticipation in the air.

 

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What's next?

 

The driver of the goods loco exchanges a few words with the driver of the autocoach probably on the lines of ' when are you going to get that glorified bus out of my way'  said in jest of course.

 

Don

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John,

I have to say, as a regular lurker on here, your thread itself reads like a book - it is certainly a modelling masterclass! Although a lover of the old G&SWR, having been reared in railway accommodation there in the fifties, I did live in Cornwall for some years and have extensively travelled in the West Country - I can't think of any other layout which captures the 'atmosphere' of the area and period as well as yours and once again, thank you for sharing it with us.

Kind regards,

Jock.

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Yes Don, one could imagine that transpiring.Very apt. An inadvertent cameo. Thank you, It raised a smile here as I know it will elsewhere..

 

And Jock, that's a very gracious compliment, thank you for it. I know my subject reasonably well and enjoy my Hintock. If in the process of its creation I give amusement and enjoyment to others than that adds to my own pleasure.

 

I get fun out of the hobby,have done so for years and I'm very grateful  for that.

 

You say my thread reads like a book, there is a link to such a book below.  I commend it to you, that is if you are not already familiar with it.

 

With regards,

Edited by john flann
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Thanks for the links John, I'm very short of time with medical issues for the rest of this week, but it looks like next week could see me immersed in the electronic book of Hintock - I'm also intrigued by the 'Gunner Flann' history, having been just too young to do National Service, but with plenty of friends from the local RAF lodge, and round table who were slightly older and had to do it! I'm sure it will be a fascinating read and hope to comment towards the end of next week. Thank you again,

Kind regards,

Jock.

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Last Wednesday August 19 was a special day in the annals of the Hintock Branch for it was the 85th birthday of one who has many links to it. To celebrate the event a Special Train to Port Bredy was run. Imagine thus:

 

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The Special, a 1400 and autocoach having arrived (see previous images, #958)  the passengers prepare to get aboard.

 

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And, the train departs with a farewell from Mr Maybrey the Stationmaster.

 

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Time for lunch: parked in the siding at Hintock Town Quay the traveller's alight and make their way to the nearby Crown Inn. An ancient hostelry ihat overlooks a broad reach of the River Bredy and is noted for its pub lunches..

 

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As the train nears Port Bredy it crosses by way of an old trestle bridge a tidal inlet off the Bredy. 

 

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Reaching Port Bredy the passengers again alighted and made their way to the GWR's Pennsylvania Castle Hotel for afternoon tea. Duly refreshed it was back to the train and Hintock where we see the train working ECS back to Weymouth.

 

A good day out was had by all.                       

Edited by john flann
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Superb photos, John.

 

Reflecting upon all of this, I find myself a Welshman, viewing photos of the Great Western Railway,as modelled by an Englishman in America, whilst I am sat in the Czech Republic.

 

How small the world seems at times........

 

 

Rob.

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Happy Birthday John.  As always superb photos. 3000  miles to the west I will raise my glass to many more such occasions.

 

Kind Regards 

 

John

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Hi John, I hadn't realised its your Birthday, all the best my friend, I will add a small shot of the Scottish Brown stuff in my coffee later and drink a Toast to you.

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Gentlemen, I owe you thanks for your Birthday wishes-which I'm very glad to be able to enjoy; for your likes, and the comments on Hintock. It is an abiding source of fun and satisfaction for me. It is all so much appreciated.

 

As to the comments:

 

Rob, I quite agree with you and it's something I've done and do myself. You can add in also Canada, Australia and New Zealand (yes, and even Japan) where there are followers. It certainly is an international. Quite why Hintock attracts such attention is a complex question. I know I'm flattered by it. I googled Hintock GWR and was pleasantly surprised by the gallery of photos there displayed.

 

GeorgeT: As I've remarked before I don't consciously add "detail". That, I think, can look artificial. I only put in what would normally be there (and could be apparent when viewed from a distance. That seems to do the trick. As Holmes said "you see Watson, but you do not observe". It has no doubt much to do with my early experiences as a surveyor out on the line, with BR, LMR.

,

I do go on a bit I know on this subject, but it is one of the bees in my bonnet.

 

Mullie: we've had no rain here for weeks. I don't miss it but a shower here and heavier rain elsewhere would be welcome. Large fires many hundreds of miles away burn out of control, often times the sky is full of smoke and we have a  smell of burning timber carried by the winds.

 

And lastly, for now, to meet AndyP's comment that no post is complete without an image, here's one for your pleasure.

 

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Edited by john flann
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