Jump to content

Berrington and Eye GWR/LNWR Joint Line 1912 - Operations


Recommended Posts

  • 1 month later...

IMG_0465.jpg.2b0180f34193a1ada3a0216791aecf1f.jpg

 

A new wagon appeared this morning at the end of the one siding at Berrington & Eye.  It is an LNWR D32 van from the Bill Bedford Mousa stable.  Some had reported that their Mousa kits had warped.  Bill suggested this could be due to a reaction to UV though most, including mine, were still in their boxes.  He suggested painting was a remedy.  Despite mine showing no signs of the dreaded warp, the first time I got the paint out, this one got the treatment.  It then sat on the bench for weeks waiting for me to get the black paint out so I could do the black bits.  

 

Behind it are a couple of ballast wagons that are part of a rake that was airbrushed at the same time.  These will form a ballast train that came off the Mid Wales line at Craven Arms and ran South the LNWR South Wales Division at Abergavenny.  Still waiting on axleboxes etc.

 

Behind them is an ancient Ratio Iron Mink that has had an MRD roof added, complete with all the riveting.  

 

The buffer stop is an LNWR one from the excellent Lanarkshire Models.  This shot is from where the road going to the station was and is the view travellers would have had on approaching the station.  Photos show that the siding really was that close to the building.  

 

The station building is still in a mocked up state though part of the roof and the chimney stacks have had some work!  There were (are) few windows and openings to this side of the building.  And indeed, I have had it confirmed,  that there was no entrance for the public into the ticket office from this side.  The door into the ticket office was on the platform that was accessed via a side gate.  All of this makes the view of this side of the building quite boring so the jury is still out as to what I am going to do about that.  Maybe I will put a door in which was the case at Woofferton.

 

Woofferton_booking_hall.jpg.2d8e8cf9791279a01d97ae8459294b7b.jpg

 

Woofferton_booking_office.jpg.3814f46f7faf99b910e6514f024fe00e.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Brassey
Added pics of Woofferton
  • Like 6
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

That Woofferton structure is very nice, good idea to use the door.

 

Unusual to build from the chimneys down! But they do look excellent, no doubt the rest will be to the same standard.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’d be inclined to model the station building as it was.  Yes Wooferton’s arrangement is more interesting, but we have to compromise on so much in our hobby, so why introduce change from reality when none is needed to depict the prototype within the constraints you have and are very successfully working within.
Duncan

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Yes, you have a point Duncan. Later it does seem to have received windows - I suppose when converted to a private house? Hard to imagine all that traffic in this photo!

 

image.png.e1e8787528d72414d8769fdaa0f7c9d4.png

Wikimedia Commons

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes guys, an interesting perspective.  The purist in me tends to agree to leave as is.

 

Since BR sold the building after closure it has acquired a door but not in this earlier view:

 

DROLL20(6).jpg.606e6b0a584fe80fe4811a793337bdba.jpg

 

But it has in this more recent view but has lost a chimney stack:

 

IMG_0061_crop.jpg.d0a9ca9747cb8ae8bc0b561d86a16220.jpg

 

The other side is more interesting as per this view from 1932 showing both the booking hall and ladies waiting room doors.  Unforunately this is not the view I am looking at on the layout.

 

Berrington_and_Eye_1932_4.jpg.f5d52a202ecd662c60a3a3ab7f984077.jpg

 

This shows the original chimney stacks well and on a model I think the are quite a dominant feature which is why I thought they added to the long-standing mock-up.  As can be seen from the mock-up, I am also struggling to recreate the red sandstone colour of the station building.  My chimney stacks are more yellow.  I'm told that the station building was built from the same sandstone as Berrington Hall, to which the the station owed its existence and name.

 

PS: this image also proves the proximity of the siding to the station building as mentioned earlier.  Only a hedge divides the platform from the goods facilities including a crane.  (You can see the other side of that hedge looking somewhat overgrown in the 1963 pic in Mikkel's post above; still there 30 years after this pic and closure!).  The PO wagons in the yard with the distinctive diamond look like a local Hereford merchant's oddly named South Wales Coal Company

Edited by Brassey
typo and PS
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Do any period photos show enamel adverts on the wall? That would brighten it up a lot. 

 

But they would only have been there if they could be seen by the public, and I'm not sure where the station access road was.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I certainly didn’t mean to suggest purism - it’s a bit too close to fanaticism for my comfort. (EM gauge: it’s the art of effective compromise...) I hoped to suggest only to keep within the bounds we each set ourselves to enjoy and progress our hobby.  And of course those standards are different for all of us - even those of us who saunter along (bickering no doubt) under the finescale banner.  But it is those self imposed boundaries that allow us to make progress and be happy with the result and if we’re not, we can move the boundaries!

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I came across this colour photo of the station, which gives an idea of the sandstone tints. The station buildings on the Shrewsbury and Hereford section were done to the same style, which I haven’t seen repeated anywhere else.

703FDE2B-E045-47C0-8145-61C7B1DEAB5F.jpeg.d24b9732d9b254c918e09c265c023534.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were trying to mix that colour from scratch, I would experiment with  a base of raw umber (GW freight brown approx) lightened with neutral grey (LMS freight grey) until I got something similar to the browner tones, then add the pinkish hue with a small amount of burnt sienna (LMS bauxite) lightened with a buff titanium (approx GWR light stone. Lay on the base colour, then do the mortar and drybrush with varying lighter shades with more or less of each of the colours except for the raw umber. You can fade them out with a little white too. It's going to be a matter for experiment, but it's not impossible. 

 

Below are a couple of patches from sketches using the above colours, showing some of the variations possible.

 

IMG_20210207_210206.jpg.07d306425a00c0bf404a9811e3a2dbf6.jpg

 

 

IMG_20210207_210259.jpg

Edited by MrWolf
PostScript!
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the headsup on the station colours.  I was rather hoping I could achieve it with one colour.  The purpose of the mockup was: 

 

1) to establish the position of structures prior to finalising the platforms and ballasting of track.  Luckily I have proper measurements of the station building which a fellow RMWeber kindly took for me.  These foundations are now cut into the platform

 

2) experiment with colours.  On the mock up I think I used brick, rust and flesh, all acrylics, of which I think flesh came closest for me.  The problem with these sandstone structures (including the overbridge) is that the colours change in the light and also how close you are to the subject.  Compare this picture to that above:

 

Berringtonandeye005.jpg.62773ae04ca62603ba248cf992c0f445.jpg

 

Interestingly you can see from this angle that there was no entrance to the building from this road side and some walls had no windows!  Even the door to the station master's house was on the platform.  That is why presumably some owner put a door in the booking hall which I thought had always been there.  (This pic from about the 70's shows that a brick extension had been added with a door but there was no door there before in earlier photos.)

 

DROLL20(4).jpg.54ae1e2834b04a304d8c2d698ee8b41b.jpg

 

This is a close-up of the errant door and shows the variation in colours although the patching I think was to fill in a letter box that would have been there.  "LB" is marked in that location on the O/S map in the OP.  

 

IMG_1894_2.jpg.5f8207ff08821945e3317c5cfb1b6cfd.jpg

 

Mikkel, Berrington and Eye proved rather camera shy and there are few pre-grouping pictures.  This pic again shows an enamel sign of the waiting hut but I have no other pictures showing signs.  You can see from this image that the public accessed the platform via steps from the overbridge.  Why these are pained white I do not know.  There was another set (marked on the map) on the other side.

 

berrington_and_eye_waitinghut.jpg.f54cdadb33017f32ccdc005ad4cc7ddf.jpg

 

You can though also see an abundant amount of floral decoration on the station which was typical of the period and which will add colour if and when I get round to it.  (also note tall telegraph poles)

 

Returning to operations, my ambition was and remains to be able to replicate the timetable.  I have calculated that this would take 30 locos, about 70 carriages and 100 or so wagons.  Given that everything is kit built and the locos and carriages need painting and lining, producing this is turning out to be quite a task.  So in he meantime, whilst I attack the kit mountain, the station builders are on furlough.  (see later post)

Edited by Brassey
  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 07/02/2021 at 07:34, drduncan said:

I certainly didn’t mean to suggest purism - it’s a bit too close to fanaticism for my comfort. (EM gauge: it’s the art of effective compromise...) I hoped to suggest only to keep within the bounds we each set ourselves to enjoy and progress our hobby.  And of course those standards are different for all of us - even those of us who saunter along (bickering no doubt) under the finescale banner.  But it is those self imposed boundaries that allow us to make progress and be happy with the result and if we’re not, we can move the boundaries!

 

Duncan you have pricked my conscience.  I am not put out by purism; quite the opposite.  As you may recall, I am a stickler for correct train formations. 

 

It has been the dilemma about the booking hall door, or lack of, plus the colour of the building that has been the cause of my procrastination.  I was always attracted to the original station building at Church Stretton which was (is) more of a honey sandstone. 

 

Church_stretton_station_door.jpg.7410f079912f0399e0656092424cf096.jpg

 

Church Stretton early '90's

 

I am not so keen on the red sandstone of Berrington & Eye but the decision is made - build it as is.  So the builders are off furlough and I'm getting the plasticard out!

 

Don't hold your breath as there are 4 tenders on my workbench, 2 locos in the cupboard of shame awaiting their wheels back from the paintshop and an order about to go into High Level for another gearbox and motor.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think the stairs being painted white was a blackout precaution put in just before WW2. Steps both sides up to the road Bridge? Saves on building a separate footbridge on the platform. There’s still a barrow crossing down the far Leominster end of the platform threading its way back to the down platform, probably with the notices advising passengers etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Northroader said:

I would think the stairs being painted white was a blackout precaution put in just before WW2.

 

Thanks.  That would make sense except, I think that it is a pre-grouping photo well before WW2. 

 

Evidence: 1) Millennium Bread (on sign) was popular at the turn of that century and IIRC the factory was blown up during a munitions explosion in the docks during WW1. 

2) This photo dated 1935 shows an LMS poster on the hut and the trees have grown taller

 

Berrington_and_Eye_1935.jpg.3cb337dabe3d5a7fc3ac006339863f6c.jpg

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Whilst thinking about things scenic, I superimposed an old map over a google snapshot of the site.  I'm repeatedly impressed how accurate these old maps were (are).  It may disappoint some to learn that Berrington & Eye was completed surrounded by fields (of varying shades of green) and not a lot has changed over the past 100 years.  The little copse to the left next to what previously was an orchard, is just off scene on the layout.  Better get the static grass out.

 

Berrington_and_Eye_map.jpg.18735b9b456c890d01f20dc355e42e6e.jpg

 

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Those farm buildings in the bottom of the image look gigantic compared to the station structure. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 08/02/2021 at 10:47, Brassey said:

 

Don't hold your breath as there are 4 tenders on my workbench, 2 locos in the cupboard of shame awaiting their wheels back from the paintshop and an order about to go into High Level for another gearbox and motor.

 

 

I would be the last person to comment on any slow progress given the glacial movement I’m making towards Nampara dealing with my BG itch.  Then I can get back to the Edwardian GWR kit stash...

 

On the plus side the pile of other peoples locos I have to finish has been reduced to one (but it appears some CAD will be needed to sort out the L&Ybrake gear - or lack there of :( ) And I have some HR axle boxes and spring assemblies to finish CADing for TattyTatlow.

 

On a serious plus side my BG coaching stock CAD is mostly convertible designs so I’ll be able to get narrow versions of the D2 40ft bke 3rd, E19 low roof bke tricomp, F1 slip, and various 40ft bke tricomps and luggage tricomps rather quickly.  :) 

 

I imagine you’ll need a lot of bke comps and tricomps for the North & West route...(And don’t forget the CR brake tricomp or the Midland ones)....

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mikkel said:

Those farm buildings in the bottom of the image look gigantic compared to the station structure. 

Modern farm buildings are huge! And even some of the medieval to Victorian barns can be pretty big. In the village I grew up in one relatively normal sized c17th-18th century brick barn (for the area) was turned into two large detached 4 bedroom homes by taking approximately 3m out of the middle...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, drduncan said:

I imagine you’ll need a lot of bke comps and tricomps for the North & West route...(And don’t forget the CR brake tricomp or the Midland ones)....

 

I've managed to source a few break compos including an LNWR 45ft (from Worsley Works).  Second class had been abolished in 1912 by the LNWR but I have some ex-tricompos in the stash.  I recall having a virtual conversation with Phillip Millard as to how long it would have taken to relabel all the second class compartments.  He also supplied me with a copy of the original drawing for the Hereford and Tamworth TPO which I had custom etched by Worsley.  It's the rear 8wh vehicle in this pic with the clerestorey roof and extended lookouts:

 

33_12_at_Hereford.jpg.05ba03c7a5366b59f70d955a99762468.jpg

 

I got some of the GWR Bettabitz sides from 247 Developments before that changed hands and the licence went.  I think this includes an F1 Slip though no slips ran on the S&H so this may turn into some kind of cut and shut.  Neither did Midland vehicles go north of Hereford via this route.  I do have the 12 wheel Caledonian coach which ran between Glasgow and Weston-s-Mare.  Caley Coaches produce this and it was advertised in the LNWR Society Newsletter. 

 

That farm complex is massive compared to the image I posted as I cropped most of it off the Google Earth snapshot.  It is the one major change in the immediate area over time (apart from the closure of the station).

 

Looking at the images I posted, the landscape around B&E appears quite flat which is surprising as it is just over the border with Shropshire into Herefordshire.  Compare it with this image I took in 2011 at the next station up, the closed Woofferton, which I think is still in Shropshire and 7 minutes away be steam engine .

 

IMG_0067b.jpg.056dbf1984e2abe70d6cea28fee757bf.jpg

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Brassey said:

the landscape around B&E appears quite flat

Yes indeed - the big hills disappear off to the southwest below Ludlow and you then enter into the rolling countryside that makes up much of central Herefordshire - only as you head back towards Wales south of Hereford do the big hills reappear to the west. Great cycling country. Which the added attractions of locally made cider and perry make into a wonderland :rolleyes:

 

Mike.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, drduncan said:

I’m sure I saw Midland stock listed in one of the working of through coaches programmes.

D

 

A Midland Brake Compo ran between Plymouth and Bradford.  It is in the GWR programme but not the LNWR marshalling diagram this is because it came off at Bristol and presumably went onto the Midland metals from there thus never going onto the joint line.  At Bristol an LNWR fish van for Leeds was added; a fitting replacement.

 

There were also a couple of GC coaches between Ilfracombe and Halifax that came off at Bristol.  Again never ventured onto the joint line from Hereford to Shrewsbury.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Whilst on the subject of traffic, I've mentioned that there were about 90 trains a day timetabled, that's less than 4 an hour.  If you eliminate the conditional goods trains, it’s down to 80.

 

The traffic at Berrington & Eye was not exactly intensive.  During daylight hours there was roughly one stopping passenger train an hour, 2 if you were lucky - one in each direction.  The first of the day was the 06:47 but that only took you as far as one station, Woofferton, from where the train worked the Tenbury branch all day returning to Leominster at 21:05 but not stopping at Berrington & Eye on its return journey.  The last down train to stop was at 21:08 almost two hours after the previous at 19:23

 

Stopping goods trains were far less.  There were 4 local goods.  A quirk of the timetable had the Down L&NWR local goods arriving within 14 minutes of the Up departing.  One arrived at Woofferton as the other was leaving at 12:05.  The Down GWR local goods left Shrewsbury at 07:20 and arrived at its final destination Hereford just after 5pm.  That’s a ten hour stint.

 

The purpose of all this was to establish how many locos I would need to run the local goods services.  I had thought that rather work a straight 10 hour shift, the crews may have swapped over halfway and the locos may have been exchanged.  However that was not the case.  At no point were the local goods at the same station at the same time.  The GWR local goods crossed in open country around 12pm and the LNWR just missed each other at Woofferton as stated.  So what happened to the crew of the GWR down local goods when they got to Hereford late afternoon; there were no other goods services leaving to return to Shrewsbury so they may have serviced the loco and returned with a local passenger but that would have made a very long day.  So maybe they went into digs overnight and returned the next day.

 

The upshot is that I will need 4 locos to run the local goods and possibly it wasn’t the same loco everyday.

 

I then took the opportunity to look at the local passenger schedule.  The carriage marshalling programme shows the format of each train and which service it returned on.  Some but not all shuttled back and forth all day.   I have previously mentioned that I would need around 30 locos to run a full timetable.  With 80 trains that’s less than 3 trains per loco.  It is somewhat disheartening to have spent many hours building a loco that may only end up pulling one or two trains but that’s how it worked.

 

To cut a long story short, my calculations on the local passenger programme showed that I have about the right amount of locos earmarked in the todo pile to run the services with a couple of spares.  That’s 23 trains - 11 Up - 12 Down.  Some did not stop at Berrington & Eye.

 

For the local carriage stock, the vast majority were GWR composites.  On the Express trains, the most prolific of vehicles were the GWR brake composites both corridor and non-corridor.  If only the building was as easy as the research.

 

  • Informative/Useful 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I could quite happily live there, I would only need to put up a Nissen hut kind of thing (painted green to blend in of course) in which to keep my rustier greasier treasures that I am not allowed to bring in the house... 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.