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Building a workshop and this is the first attempt at a corrugated roof. Didn't like the overlap...or the colour....or the weathering

 

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Thanks scenery.

 

If you look at the bottom picture the edges are thin and more accurate for 00 gauge.

 

The maunfactured sheets are about 1mm thick which.would be 3" thick in real life. Totally not what they should be. So I made my own from thin card and clear plastic instead!

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Hi Peter.

Brilliant corrugated and I can remember the days when GEM used to produce scale sheets in 00 from copper, or you could make your own from corrugated cardboard by easing the top layer off.

 

However, and as much as I admire your tenacity, I always use Slaters corrugated - it looks the buisines and is about 15 thou thick at most.

Anyway, here's a pic - a building made totally out of Slaters sheets.

 

Cheers.

Allan

 

post-18579-0-02716500-1390768040.jpg

Edited by allan downes

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I read in the latest issue of "Model Rail" that Redutex offer "a particularly effective weathered corrugated iron". Has anyone tried this yet?

Regards,

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great-looking work. thanks for posting, and I'll take a few tips out of that. I've not started my little project yet but had bought the Wills sheets. I'll try thinning the material out at the edges as it is a bit thick.

 

on a related issue: do you (or anyone else) know when see-thru corrugated roofing first appeared? I've looked high and low but had no luck finding out.

 

:)

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We certainly had "see through" corrugated sheeting in the early 70s on a small greenhouse.

 

Don't know how long it was available before then though.

 

Regards

 

Ian

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on a related issue: do you (or anyone else) know when see-thru corrugated roofing first appeared? I've looked high and low but had no luck finding out.

 

:)

 

 

Clear panels were certainly incorporated into the roof of the workshop at the garage and filling station dad owned in the late '50's. An extension in 1962ish had similar panels incorporated into the asbestos roofing. - the sheets were the big6 industrial scale corrugated sheets.

 

We also had clear plastic roof sheets of 'domestic' corrugated iron profile in a cover to the side of our house, which was constructed by my dad in 1960.

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Hi Peter.

Brilliant corrugated and I can remember the days when GEM used to produce scale sheets in 00 from copper, or you could make your own from corrugated cardboard by easing the top layer off.

 

However, and as much as I admire your tenacity, I always use Slaters corrugated - it looks the buisines and is about 15 thou thick at most.

Anyway, here's a pic - a building made totally out of Slaters sheets.

 

Cheers.

Allan

 

post-18579-0-59477800-1367790535.jpg

Allan - looks great but I still think that the shadows under each individual sheet are too heavy. On a real roof the joins would be barely visible from that distance.

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I agree I think you own made one does look more realistic, can you explain the technique you used to actually make it?

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Someone sent me a little tutorial a couple of months back on how he made some corrugated iron for a project. I think he used thickish tin foil from a takeaway container, and used an empty ball-point pen to score it using the little ridges on an aluminium door strip as a guide. I thought it was a fantastic idea! Most of us probably have the perfect die for making up our own sheets less than a few feet away from us right now!

 

I did post it up on my blog a while back, but don't want to get slaughtered for post links I shouldn't so if anyone would like the link, let me know and I'll post it.

 

Thanks :)

 

Justin

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Allan - looks great but I still think that the shadows under each individual sheet are too heavy. On a real roof the joins would be barely visible from that distance.

 Ah but Peter, if you built everything to true scale, you wouldn't be able to see it at all.

 

For example, how thick are your glazing bars? well I bet they're not a hair's thickness as they would need to be if modelled to true scale - and as for N Gauge white metal locos, well they're just as thick as a Gauge 1 kit which would mean body panels, side frames etc would be made out of  foot  thick steel plate! or, if it was to true scale, made out of tissue paper !

 

To me it's always been the visual effect over dead scale, work for what the eye can see, not for what it can't.

 

So mate, not a critisim, just a friendly observation.

 

Cheers.

Allan

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I see your point allan - eyes can be deceiving and most real buildings are not viewed from 100 feet in the sky! There is no way I can say that your corrugated building looks wrong. It's fantastic and you are totally right, at that distance the camera wouldn't pick up the panels.

 

That said, I want to try it anyway!

 

 

This laser cut window is true scale

post-21051-0-30382800-1390849577.jpg

Edited by Peterkern23

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I agree I think you own made one does look more realistic, can you explain the technique you used to actually make it?

 

Ever heard of a soft wax applicator?

http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/300817083504

 

I use them when I do my French polishing repairs. They have a ridge on the side that it perfect for pressing out sheets from thin card. I used two together and trimmed the result to fit.

 

I have had a brainwave though. If the manufactured corrugated sheets are textured both sides then cut two pieces and press lightly moist card in them and then let them dry in the airing cupboard. Might work?

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Yup that's different, I do something similar using a bolt and thick foil, specifically I find a 7/16 UNF gives me an acceptable looking corrugation. (I have access to a full range of bolts at work)

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I see your point allan - eyes can be deceiving and most real buildings are not viewed from 100 feet in the sky! There is no way I can say that your corrugated building looks wrong. It's fantastic and you are totally right, at that distance the camera wouldn't pick up the panels.

 

That said, I want to try it anyway!

 

 

This laser cut window is true scale

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

 

Hi Peter, really nice window.

 

Now if that's four mm scale and a brick is 3inches thick - which is about the same size as the window cross bar as makes no difference, then said bar is about 3 inches thick and the vertical glazing bars look to be about one and a half inches wide and I would suspect therefore not exactly to scale but - you can at least see them - without NHS specs !

 

Nice work all the same Mate.

 

Cheers.

Allan.

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This isn't my window it's from the truetexture website sorry should have mentioned that!

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Most definately the work of some one who thinks beyond the box - brilliant stuff Peter and you're weathering is second to none.

 

Right Peter, what everyone would like to see I'm sure, is  something like a small diorama from you along with your unique means and methods. 

 

Cheers.

Allan.

 

BTW, whoe's your manicurist? !

Edited by allan downes

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My manicurist? My teeth - bad habit!

 

I have a few old photos when i used to kitbash and scratch build in card. But they are not a reflection of my best work.

 

An old shelf model diorama I did when i was about 25

 

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A portion of the street I made for my son for his 1:76 cars.

 

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A scratchbuilt Kwik fit garage made using photoshop

 

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Part shots of "The Yard"

 

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and finally the atmospheric shot of the yard

 

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Edited by Peterkern23
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Also, I have finished the other side of the roof. Sorry for all the pictures!

 

Adding the moss, dark rust and weathering the skylight.

 

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the top ridge will b added once the roof is in place and is secure. It will be made from the same brown card.

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Also, my son has been pestering me about posting his own efforts, so here it is (with a little help from yours truly of course);

 

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Bless, he's only five. Lets keep the hobby alive I say!

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