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Swindon 123

On Shenston Road. Some recent photos.

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I have had a quick look on the web and found a couple of things to do with Dowlais works which is the last place I saw them running to. Some interesting photos in this link .

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/davidbeilby.htm

The second photo down shows ingot moulds stood next to 27T tipplers. The moulds are pretty large and look as though they would fill a tippler, which are what I suppose carried them there.

Other interesting stuff on Dowlais in this link.

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/Dowlais_works.htm

Including a shot halfway down the page the Sleeper Mill used for producing early steel sleepers.

Another find was the photo in this link of the last ingot cast at Dowlias which weighed 18 tons. At a guess the mould that it was cast in would have ben about the same weight but that is a bit of speculation on my part. Hopefully someone will know the proper answer.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/302103

 

Finally I found this link which shows a train journey returning ingot moulds to Dowlais.

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/radyrtocaeharris.htm

 

There is one shot of shots of moulds in tipplers, and they fill the wagon.

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/Images_A-H/Dowlais_CNV00010_AndyKirkham.jpg

 

The things you can find out when you put your mind, and the computer to work.

 

Paul J.

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I have had a quick look on the web and found a couple of things to do with Dowlais works which is the last place I saw them running to. Some interesting photos in this link .

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/davidbeilby.htm

The second photo down shows ingot moulds stood next to 27T tipplers. The moulds are pretty large and look as though they would fill a tippler, which are what I suppose carried them there.

Other interesting stuff on Dowlais in this link.

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/Dowlais_works.htm

Including a shot halfway down the page the Sleeper Mill used for producing early steel sleepers.

Another find was the photo in this link of the last ingot cast at Dowlias which weighed 18 tons. At a guess the mould that it was cast in would have ben about the same weight but that is a bit of speculation on my part. Hopefully someone will know the proper answer.

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/302103

 

Finally I found this link which shows a train journey returning ingot moulds to Dowlais.

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/radyrtocaeharris.htm

 

There is one shot of shots of moulds in tipplers, and they fill the wagon.

http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/Images_A-H/Dowlais_CNV00010_AndyKirkham.jpg

 

The things you can find out when you put your mind, and the computer to work.

 

Paul J.

Thanks for posting that- I stand corrected.

I would say, though, despite the caption, the large casting that had been 'stuffed and mounted' is an ingot mould, not an ingot. The give-away are the two 'ears' at the top, which would be where the slings would be attached to lift the mould clear of the ingot after the latter had cooled a bit. Those things retained their heat; if the mould was cast on the Monday, it would still be warm on Friday. It was one of the big sticking-points in the production process, in that there wasn't much you could do in the way of fettling or machining until they'd cooled sufficiently.

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Brian's correct, that is an ingot mould, some are featured in the link I post below.

Edit: Dowlais didn't cast ingots (iron isn't cast into ingots) they casted ingot moulds. Just an error by the photographer.

 

The mould would weigh more than the ingot, part of it's job is to absorb some of the heat out of the ingot to help it solidify, and the bigger the mass of iron, the better. They never get hot enough to 'glow' even mildly despite the contents being incandescent. Heavy walls are also better able to withstand the stresses of very rapid heating on the inner surface when being teemed (filled).

 

I estimated that RT models ingots scale out at 3tons and the small ingot mould, in which they fit, at 6.5 tons. Even allowing for the walls on the ingot moulds being a little over thick it's not far out.

 

Here's a link to the relevant posting on the BCB thread.

 

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/57246-black-country-blues-rolling-stock-workbench/?p=1164245

Edited by Arthur

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Awesome layout, absolutely Proper Job. I got into modelling BR Blue and making my own track because of seeing layouts like this, Wibdenshaw, Easington Lane and the rest of the "EM Gauge 70s" layouts. Please keep the photos coming Paul. I love the headboard on D1023, I preume it is scanned from a photo?

Edited by 37114

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Those chlorine tankers are lovely; where did you get the lettering from? I recollect both Hornby-Dublo and Triang did versions of this type of bogie tanker.

If anyone fancies running them, but doesn't want to have a whole rake, they did run in wagonload services to deliver to smaller customers. One such was on the Uskmouth branch- was it Dow?

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Those chlorine tankers are lovely; where did you get the lettering from? I recollect both Hornby-Dublo and Triang did versions of this type of bogie tanker.

If anyone fancies running them, but doesn't want to have a whole rake, they did run in wagonload services to deliver to smaller customers. One such was on the Uskmouth branch- was it Dow?

Hi Brian

 

Thanks for your comments.The chlorine tanks are scratch built, I was planning to use the Triang tank as a basis but gave up due to the many inaccuracies I would  have to put right.Roger Silsbury kindly sent me a lot of info on the various types 16 years ago and along with photos John Talbot kindly lent me and the aid of my diagram books I was able to create a more accurate model.John also cast the plate bogies and the filler cap and tank saddles, the rest was built using ever green and the barrel is plastic fax tube that was cut to length , the ends coming from airfix 35 glw tank barrels.I done the lettering by using the edding and/or DECAdry dry print onto plain waterslider transfer sheet  then applied the completed transfer to the tank barrel. this enables you to get the right spacing and keep it level (much easier to work out the size and spacing on a flat surface before applying to the barrel) .

 

This train  use to pass through Hereford in the early evening on weekdays from Sandbatch to Baglan bay and due to the nature of the product carried, always ran with a brake van on the rear . The train had unfortunately stopped running when I started on the railway in the mid seventies so its operation beyond Hereford to me still remains a mystery.As you noted, I have found pics of the odd tank on the east Usk branch and also a pic of a rake of empties returning in a mixed freight climbing stormy but have never seen them pass through Hereford returning north.

 

cheers Greg

 

Edited by D1047

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Absolutely awesome - have seen it on the website but great to see it here too.

 

Oozing with character and very inspirational modelling :good:

Edited by bcnPete

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Hello,

 

Apologies if this has been mentioned already...are the large buildings in the backdrop scratch built? They look stunning and something I'd love to add to my layout.

 

Thanks

Mark

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Just had a look at this thread on impulse (blue diesels etc are not my cup of Darjeeling!) to find some fabulous and beautifully observed modelling. I'm now following this topic!

 

A quick question: what is the original of the lamps you use, street lamps and platform lamps? The concrete posts of the latter look like Ratio, but what about the reflectors and lamps themselves?

 

David C

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Hello,

 

Apologies if this has been mentioned already...are the large buildings in the backdrop scratch built? They look stunning and something I'd love to add to my layout.

 

Thanks

Mark

Hi Mark  

 

Most of the large industrial  buildings have been kit bashed from Walther or Kibri buildings or building parts with a few extra bits added or extended.The plans are usually discarded and the building purpose built to fit the footprint.The brewry for example was a Kibri colliery .There is also a few scratch built buildings copied from photos of suitable buildings from the black country to try to give the area an identity

 

cheers Greg.   

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ALL of the layouts and models featured on EM gauge 70's website are superb. An absolute inspiration for me even though I model the "rarely modelled" era, 1966-68 Late steam, blue & green diesels.

 

http://www.emgauge70s.co.uk/

 

I look forward to the monthly update page.

 

Brit15

 

Thanks for that link. Truly superb layouts.

 

Think that is the first time that I have seen someone draw a layout plan in the form of a large scale OS map. As a bit of a map fanatic, I just love that.

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Absolutely incredible modelling!!

One of the finest layouts and collection of rolling stock I've laid eye's on in a very long time!

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Wonderful stuff, I love the contrast of old vacuum brake and new AB stock which must have seemed incredibly different at the time....

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Just to add to Paul's comments.

 

The Leathers tanks later taken over by Hayes and built by C.F.P.M. to dia TE004A in 1970 and totalling just 8 wagons used to run through Hereford in the early 70s from Avonmouth to St Helens.I built these about 20 years ago having obtained a good detailed works drawing.

 

They were built for a future layout to be based on my train spotting memories.

 

I started by reduced the drawings to 4mm. They were constructed again using a fax tube as the tank barrel and airfix tank end caps,  evergreen strip and channel was used for the chassis MTK esc1 bogies were sourced from my odds and sods collection and John Talbot supplied the buffers discharge pipe and hand-brake wheel.I made a jig for the walkway hand rail and Paul kindly using his soldering skills fabricated them and soldered them to a etched brass ladders.The livery was colour matched to a photo and the lettering was done in the same way as the Murgatroyd tanks.

 

thanks for looking

 

Greg 

  • Like 3

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Only just discovered this thread.  Some fabulous modelling here - reminds me of the end of my trainspotting days, mix of green and blue diesels with proper numbers. I particularly like the steel wire coils (a couple of pages back): what did you use for those?  Excellent stuff.

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New thread to me, too. Now that I'm running more green diesels than steam locos, I'm feeling a tug towards the blue. Green and blue look so well, together. It's also worth remembering that there was still some steam about with early blue.

 

And I particularly like the structural modelling, the houses, mixing Skaledale with scratch - something else I'm planning to do. The helicopter view of Station Road, Birmingham end, it's one of my favourite urban views ever, and that's saying something; a guess it'll live on my desktop for quite a while.

 

Anyway, I'm now a follower! :)

 

Hal.

Edited by HAL 'O THE WYND

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Only just discovered this thread.  Some fabulous modelling here - reminds me of the end of my trainspotting days, mix of green and blue diesels with proper numbers. I particularly like the steel wire coils (a couple of pages back): what did you use for those?  Excellent stuff.

The wire coils are literally made from wire, 5 or 13 amp (I can't remember which)fuse wire. I bought a roll of it years ago from an old style electrical shop, mainly to make up wire and post fencing. When Greg was looking for wire coils a few things where tried without success until I remembered the fuse wire. It was patiently wound around a suitable size tube into a number of coils before being added to the wagon.

 

More photos are in the process of being made ready for the thread with a look at some of Greg's Coke hopper variant's.

 

Paul J.

  • Like 1

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Yes, that helicopter view of Station Road is superb. Looking at it, it shows quite a wide baseboard with tall buildings on either side. Do you have problems with access to the running lines for maintenance etc? Are the buildings removeable?

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