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Image restoration from pre-May 2021 continues and may take an indefinite period of time.

Triang English Electric Type 3


Darius43
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Looking tidy already! Improving the cab windscreens is essential on this model. I have one fitted with the A1 overlays, painted up as 37009 in green, the only such split-box example. 

However, forgive me for asking but did you go for Class 31 bogies for that retro Tri-ang look?! Fine if you did, but if this prompts an "oh darn it" response, Lendons of Cardiff currently have Hornby Railroad Class 37 motor and trailing bogie frames (X9919/9920) available at very low prices with low postage rates, and it should be possible to transfer the 31 running gear into them. I'm banking on it actually, I've just put an order through for these and 'donor' Class 66 complete drive unit & trailing bogies, with the intention of remotoring the tidy Lima 50149 'Defiance' I've just acquired. I have assumed that, like the Lima drive unit, the Hornby RR unit is universal, and that if Lima Class 37 bogies can be made to fit their 50, so can these. I've also ordered a Class 66 underframe purely for its bogie pivots to attach to the Lima 50 chassis - at a shade over two quid it's not worth messing about with thick plasticard. Although one never knows whether things will require gentle persuasion or a hammer to cooperate until the bits are laid out on the worktop, I find nothing is impossible and the finished loco will have cost me around a quarter of what Hornby's limited edition 50149 is fetching these days. With a bit of fettling it'll be good enough for my purposes.

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Like the recently completed Brush Type 2, this is a friend of mine’s model that I am upgrading.  He wants the retro look retained to a certain extent but one of the main requirements is for the loco to run on code 75 track so new wheels are essential - these new bogies fit the bill.

 

They will also, hopefully, sound less like a bucket of bolts than the modified Triang motor bogie when running..

 

Cheers

 

Darius

 

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Lamp irons and handrails fitted to the noses.

 

47F252F6-477C-4CD4-AA0E-A78193CA84D9.jpeg.ef0eabd7b85526766d3e21285e649487.jpeg

 

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The taped “bracing” on the main grilles is to create an impression of the real thing.  They will be removed after the next primer coat.

 

Cheers

 

Darius

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16 hours ago, Darius43 said:

Like the recently completed Brush Type 2, this is a friend of mine’s model that I am upgrading.  He wants the retro look retained to a certain extent but one of the main requirements is for the loco to run on code 75 track so new wheels are essential - these new bogies fit the bill.

 

They will also, hopefully, sound less like a bucket of bolts than the modified Triang motor bogie when running..

 

Cheers

 

Darius

 

 

Ah OK, understood - I think quieter running will be assured.......

 

I guessed what you were up to with the masking tape!

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It is good to see how well these old timers scrub up.  Triang were pretty good at plastic mouldings, and the Brush Type 2 was IMHO one of the very best RTR UK models available of any sort anywhere of it's time, up there with the Hornby Dublo EE Type 1 and 350hp shunter.  It was knocked into the proverbial cocked hat by the Airfix when that arrived on the scene, which had much better bogies, but in 1962...  It was let down by the solid bogie frames and the ride height, 2mm too high as on all Triang models, a heritage from the Rovex Black Princess' need to get it's leading bogie around 13" radius curves and clear the cylinders.  This loco was still being produced in 1952 and all Triang stock had to match it's incorrect buffer height.

 

The EE Type 3 was a few years after the Brush, and used the Brush bogies which were completely wrong for it, which meant that even back then I did not take it seriously as a model.  That apart, it wasn't bad and you've proved that it had plenty of 'work up' potential.  Another objection I had to it was the protruding marker lamp housings which stand out on the corners of the nose; in my younger days I was more reluctant to cut models about.  It also rode too high on the bogies, at one time a feature that dissuaded me from any Triang or Triang Hornby models.

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Halvarras has a point with reference to the Class 31 bogies on the EE type 3 so they are being transferred to the Brush Type 2.

 

Some Railroad Class 37 bogies are now on their way from Peter’s Spares.

 

In the meantime I have a second Triang EE Type 3 that will become a split headcode version.

 

Watch this space…

 

Cheers

 

Darius

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One of the later iterations of the Triang Class 37 had split boxes, would one of these be a good starting point?

 

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The Triang model had an amazing production run, 1965-2005, being released in both green livery and EWS livery when they were contemporary!  

Edited by Titan
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Hi Titan,

 

I have an old etched brass fret with various class 37 bits on it including the cab doors and nose grilles for a split box variant.

 

The plan is to use these with some 3D printed split boxes to convert the second Triang EE Type 3 that I have.

 

Speaking of which…

 

B2A5D470-6748-43B9-9C4F-D7A582D964EC.jpeg.4cf9d7dcfb83d934c06d915718ce59d5.jpeg

 

0EF40F35-E7C9-48FF-9916-871F2DBD10E4.jpeg.19eccd7c0b7c7ca48fa605ec0d563d5f.jpeg

 

Cheers

 

Darius

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More very rapid work, I'm surprised the paint dries that fast! Also noted the addition of etched windscreen overlays since Wednesday too.

 

I have taken delivery of the Railroad bogie parts from Lendons for my Lima Class 50 remotoring exercise and can confirm that the Class 66 drive unit simply clicks into the Class 37 bogie frame, as expected. However - and judging from the Peter's Spares photo I think you will have found the same with the complete Class 37 drive unit from them - these Railroad drive units obtained as spares are not 'ready to run', in that they are devoid of any wiring so the pick-ups are not connected to the motor. This shouldn't come as a surprise and when carrying out these remotoring tasks soldering work is to be expected. I thought it worth mentioning for others who may be considering RR drive conversions because the older ringfield or pancake type drives had plug-in connections (not sure about the Chinese 5-pole versions though as I don't have any to check!)

I also found that, although described as 'complete', the Class 66 trailing bogie came without pick-up strips, although at the low price I'm not complaining and I've made and fitted a few (quite a few!) over the years. As far as my Class 50 is concerned I think carving away the Class 37 bogie footsteps will be considerably more taxing. Again the wheelsets and retainer are a straight swap into the Class 37 trailing bogie frame. Did your 37 RR trailing bogie come with pick-ups?

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The 37 RR trailing bogies came with the pickups with a drop of solder on the pads ready for wire attachment.

 

Peter’s Spares has only one left so I have purchased two motor bogies for the split headcode Type 3 - no shortage of power for this loco...

 

Cheers

 

Darius

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