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Signs, posters and adverts

Posted by Mikkel , in The Bay 17 November 2009 · 3,757 views

signs buildings Bay
Here's a selection of the signs, posters and adverts that I've used on "The bay" to help enhance the ambience.

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The station sign for Farthing, summarizing the fictional geography of the old N&SR line. The sign is printed, a temporary measure that may become permanent now that the RMweb competition is tempting me to move on quickly to the next layout in the series. I intended to use Smiths 4mm and 2mm etched letters for the job, although testing suggested that it would be very time consuming as there is so much text here. The sign was printed using fonts stored in the files section of the always excellent GWR e-list.



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The Smiths etched letters are good though, and for a simpler station sign the job would quickly have been done. These are 4mm and 2mm scale respectively. This type of letters appears to have been introduced on the GWR around 1906, replacing an earlier more elaborate style.




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The screen for the Gentlemen's lavatory. The posterboard is a modified card item from Tiny Signs. I built up a frame from thin strips of Plastikard to bring out the relief. The posters are reduced and printed from examples found on the web. I've since noticed that many GWR posterboards from the period had a darkish frame. I assume it is the brown colour discussed in this thread? In that case I'll need to send in the painters.




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The posterboards from Tiny Signs as they come. An alternative set is available from Smiths.



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Enamel adverts, mostly from Tiny Signs. I tone them down slightly with satin varnish and weather them with eg a little rust at the edges. I've also made a few adverts myself, based on real prototypes that I've reproduced on the PC. Unfortunately my printer can't match the sharply printed commercial offerings. New insights from David Bigcheeseplant here on RMweb indicates that when the painters are done with the posterboards, they can move on to the window frames and apply the same brown colour.



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A sheet of adverts from Tiny Signs. It can be quite hard to tell what period the different adverts are from, as appearances can be deceitful and a check of old photos doesn't always help. I seem to remember there was a series of articles about enamel ads in Model Rail some years ago. Does anyone remember what issues they were?



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Etched station signs from Scalelink. These were painted all-over black while still on the etch, after which the paint was wiped off the raised letters. The letters were then painted white by carefully dragging a broad flat brush across them.
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You've made a damn good job of weathering those signs. I always keep an eye out for printed signs and posters in railway monthlies after discovering the computer printed things fade and loose their colour. Sad really as I had a lot of LNWR black & white 'finger' signs printed but they simply fade so quickly.

Larry
Thanks Larry. Looking at them in close-up I do think I've overdone the weathering here and there - must learn to resist that!

It's only recently that I've experimented with print-outs from the computer, so interesting to hear that they fade over time. And varnishing does not help?
Mikkel.Can you tell me how you did the lettering on the nameboards using the file download off the GW E list please.
Colourfastness:

Depends on your printer. A lot of inkjet printers now use colourfast inks, after a big flaw in home digital photography became apparent in short space of time... My dad's recent printers (semi-professional portrait & wedding photographer) certainly produce images that don't fade over something like a 50+ or 100+ year lifespan.

I'd doubt varnishing would help, I *think* the problem is sunlight breaking down the pigments? Unless the varnish blocked UV or something?

Mikkel.Can you tell me how you did the lettering on the nameboards using the file download off the GW E list please.



Hi Robin, here's the process:

1. On GWR e-list, go to files > Fonts & Logos
2. Click the font "GWR Nameboards.ttf" and save it to the "Fonts" folder on your computer (mine is at C:/Windows/Fonts).
3. Close the download. You now have the font installed. To actually make the sign:
4. Open a new Word document (if that's what you've got) and turn on the "Draw" tool-bar
5. Make a "textbox" the size of your station sign (you can always adjust this)
6. Set the background colour of the textbox to black
7. Set the font colour to white
8. In the font selection option, find and select the now installed "GWR Signs" font
9. Write your text in the box, and align/center/space words as appropriate
10. Print and cut out sign. You'll need to choose the highest level of print quality.

Sounds a bit laborious, but if all goes well it's actually a fairly quick job. Finding the "Fonts" folder in step 2 can be the most tricky bit!
Jamie: Thanks for that info. The signs I did print don't seem to be fading yet, but its only been a few months. I'm not even sure whether the ink I have is colourfast, must check! The printer is a fairly cheap one though, so the most immediate problem is simply getting it to print sharply enough.

Hi Robin, here's the process:

1. On GWR e-list, go to files > Fonts & Logos
2. Click the font "GWR Nameboards.ttf" and save it to the "Fonts" folder on your computer (mine is at C:/Windows/Fonts).
3. Close the download. You now have the font installed. To actually make the sign:
4. Open a new Word document (if that's what you've got) and turn on the "Draw" tool-bar
5. Make a "textbox" the size of your station sign (you can always adjust this)
6. Set the background colour of the textbox to black
7. Set the font colour to white
8. In the font selection option, find and select the now installed "GWR Signs" font
9. Write your text in the box, and align/center/space words as appropriate
10. Print and cut out sign. You'll need to choose the highest level of print quality.

Sounds a bit laborious, but if all goes well it's actually a fairly quick job. Finding the "Fonts" folder in step 2 can be the most tricky bit!


Thanks Mikkel for a very detailed reply !
Yes well it also helps me remember it myself! During a modelling project I tend to assume that I'll be able to remember a particular technique or process forever, then after a week I've forgotten! I'll bet you know what I mean?!

Hi Mikkel.Can you describe to me how you highlighted the white over the black on the etched signs.I assume you used enamel paint here.Not easy I'd imagine.

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Signs, posters and adverts
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