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1951 Pullman Scratchbuild in 1/32





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#176 hendie

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 18:05

It's been one of those modeling sessions  hours  days  weekends.  Let's start with the good news.

 

Okay, that's over, let's continue with what else has been happening.  The side frames were given a coat of etch primer on the external faces.  That went reasonably well with the exception of a couple of small blemishes in the covering on both side frames.  I micro meshed those this morning and gave another coat of etch primer, then I caught a small sink mark where I had not filled with enough solder.  That was filled with some filler I had handy, then sanded back.  The side frames have now been given their last coat of etch primer and are sitting curing as I type.  I will leave those at least overnight before giving them a coat of primer type primer.

Actually, I'm off on business again this week so it may be next weekend before they get the primer coat.

All that being done, I am pretty happy with the side frames.  I also took the opportunity while I was rattle canning to spray some of the styrene side frame failures as test beds for the different paints.  I will coat these test pieces before I spray the side frames to ensure there is no reaction with the paints.

 

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Now the vestibule ends.... those damn vestibule ends.  Aaarghhhh!  I don't know what it is about them but they seem determined to fight me all the way, and back again!   After my last post, I marked up the ends for the material to be removed - it was about 2.5 mm give or take from each upright.  I had allowed 19 mm for the door opening when I should have allowed 21.5 mm.  The door itself is 19 mm but there's also a door jamb in there too.

 

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This is how much needs to come off.  A simple enough job... place sandpaper on the bench then rub end vestibule back and forth to remove unwanted plastic.

 

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Which all went far too well until I came to remove the masking tape - a whole bunch or primer and wotnot came off with it too.  Well, that's not particularly good or confidence inspiring is it?  Especially when I know I'll be masking that lot later.

 

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So after considering the options, I took the decision to sand everything back to plastic again

 

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On the face of it that also went well, until I realized that some of the wet from my wet and dry had got in behind the plastic and soaked into the wooden paneling - yes, you guessed it... another disaster.

At this point I almost considered asking my friends back at the machine shop to EDM me a set of vestibule ends, but sanity prevailed - in brass there would be six bends in each piece, and I know I'd need about a dozen attempts to try and get all the bends in the right place.  I'm sticking with what I have, and the de'il tak the hindmost !

 

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Obviously, I know that water and thin sheets of absorbent wood don't go particularly well together.... I know that!  So why I didn't try to protect the paneling better is a question best left to ehrr... someone else, not me.

After messing about with it and trying to fix things it was obvious I had to go back to square one. Well, not quite square one but almost...

The main issue I had was that I had used rectangles of basswood as a spacer/strengthener between the outer wall and the paneling.  Now, because of the grain, it was good in one direction but not the other.  I needed a different material - 1 mm thick styrene.

The plastic could be rescued as could the main door beams so I cut out styrene spacers and glued them in position, as well as adding some other little blocks here and there to add strength.

 

P9040009.jpg

 

The problem I face here - and I knew this one was coming is that we all know what happens when we glue two flat surfaces together with styrene cement... one of them ends up with sink marks.  At least this time I was prepared for that.  You can see one just at the angle near the left top of the gangway opening.  Overall, not too many sinks at all - much better then I anticipated.

 

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So that's where I'm currently at with this purgatorial build.  I'll let that glue cure overnight before filling and sanding (yet again).

I'm surprised there's any plastic left on those vestibule ends after all the sanding they've endured.

 

I tackled a couple of small jobs, but gave up as my heart wasn't in it today.  I'm really focused on getting the side frames and vestibule ends painted and since they've been my nemesis for what seems like at least the last year, I need to get those defeated before I can move on.  I'm so close, but it appears that every time I get close, something falls out of the sky to give my butt a great big kick and bring me back down to earth again.


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#177 hendie

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Posted 08 September 2017 - 20:20

Back from my travels once again and I managed to sneak downstairs for a few hours before SWMBO came home.

 

Since I only had an hour or two I didn't want to get into anything too deep.  I had started this job before I departed earlier this week - During my frequent photo reviews I spotted that the electrical boxes have some conduit running alongside the end of the chassis.  It was one of those small details that can easily be missed but once you see it, you know you have to do it.

Stainless steel wire was used to replicate the conduit...

 

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Which was then painted up and had a few days curing while I was away.

 

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So it was a relatively easy job to fit that today, and also to tidy up a few loose ends, namely, the cover panels on the electrical boxes, and the retaining chains for the buffer spacers/extenders or whatever they're called.  Just a few paint touch ups and that will be complete.

 

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I had also spotted that I still had to add the airlines or vacuum pipes for the brakes.  A quick search around my scrap box yielded no results, but I did find some solder that was a good match for the thickness I was looking for.

I drilled out some Meng nuts to start the connector....

 

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Then added some styrene tube, followed by some aluminum rivets. Can you see where I'm going with this ?

 

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Then the valve was finished off with another Meng nut.  The dome head of the rivet was filed flat and a hole drilled in the end to accept a brass pin, around which I formed the levers that appear on these valves.

The front two are complete and the rear two are still in process.

 

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A quick squirt of primer and you can get an idea of what they are going to look like in position.  I still have to make the brackets that they're mounted on along with the connector on the other end of the hose.

 

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Small progress but enjoyable nonetheless.


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#178 natterjack

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 15:19

Your thread is inspirational and I particularly appreciate your accounts of the trials and tribulations involved.

 

Les


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#179 N15class

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 19:27

Everything looks spot on again. All very inspirational.
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#180 hendie

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 20:37

Thanks Les, thanks Peter,

 

It's getting there but certainly taking a lot longer than I originally anticipated.  However, for the most part it is still enjoyable although I am tempted to start another build just to have a bit of a change.  The worry is that if I put it aside I'll lose momentum, or get side tracked fro a substantial time, neither of which I want to happen.



#181 hendie

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Posted 17 September 2017 - 19:46

Well, modeling is all great and good when it all goes well.  At other times it can all become rather frustrating, which to be honest is what has been happening recently.

 

I did get the vacuum,  air hoses, and valves finished.  Brass angle was used as stanchions to support the hoses, and glued into place using epoxy.

 

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Then once I had connected everything in place, I wasn't too happy with the result.  Most of the photo's I've seen of these items have the hoses mounted more or less vertically.  I think these are at too much of an angle.  There's not really a lot of room for placement here so I can't get them mounted vertically, but hopefully  better than this.

 

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The stanchions were cut off and remounted, this time with better effect.  Still not perfect but better than they were.

 

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I also took the opportunity to fix the chains in place and do some touch up painting.

 

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Now onto those side frames and vestibules.  They are fighting me all the way... and so far, they are winning.  I don't know what it is about these parts but I am just having no luck at all.

The etch primer went on the brass frames perfectly -  I couldn't have been happier.  However, when I applied a coat of ordinary primer over the top, it didn't go so well.  I think it was my fault in not shaking the rattle can enough prior to spraying.  Mea culpa.

So as I write, the side frames have been taken back to brass once again.

 

Vestibules: Again, just not going well and I couldn't get a decent paint finish on them.  I'm going to have one more try and if it doesn't work, I may have to remake them yet again.

 

Recently, it appears that every time I try and work on something in this project, I end up a bit further back than when I started. Incredibly frustrating - especially when I was so close to crossing a major milestone.  After pondering it for some time,  I have decided to start another project as a diversion from this. I do not intend it to be a long diversion but I need a little break from this to refresh the batteries and prevent it from becoming a real chore, which is not what this hobby is supposed to be about.

 

So... I'm going to take a little break and I'll be back when I have some good news to post.


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#182 peter220950

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 08:01

Don't forget there's a section for non-railway modelling in modeling musings and miscellany, so you could keep us up to date with the new project. Some of us will miss the Master Classes.

Unless of course you think RMWeb is the cause of your troubles!

Peter
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#183 hendie

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 22:46

Don't forget there's a section for non-railway modelling in modeling musings and miscellany, so you could keep us up to date with the new project. Some of us will miss the Master Classes.

Peter

 
 
Well so far I've only glued two parts together. My last project of this particular aircraft (Wessex HC2 helicopter) took nearly two years and I plan on outdoing that build with this new one.  I can certainly add it if folks are interested enough.

 

Unless of course you think RMWeb is the cause of your troubles!


Not in the slightest.  I've had some great information provided by the folks on here - information which I couldn't have gotten anywhere else


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