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An engine shed for a GWR branch-line





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#51 kandc_au

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 22:19

Thank you sir.
Exactly what I wanted to know.

Khris

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#52 Captain Kernow

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 12:20

I tend to make windows such as these by printing out an outline onto self-adhesive paper, sticking it to acrylic sheet, or CD case plastic, and then cutting out the panes of glass and picking them off with a pair of tweezers. There is no need to cut individual panes out, simply run a new [sharp] scalpel blade right across the full width of the windows, the tiny squares of sticky paper remain stuck in the interstices quite well. For white frames such as these, I print out in a pale grey colour so that any slight mis-cutting doesn't show up rudely as were the case if I had printed in black.

This is fascinating, and implies that the whole process is a lot less of a PITA than it might otherwise be!

Any chance of a few photos in 'step-by-step' fashion of this part of the process sometime, please Doug?

Thanks.

#53 Chubber

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 13:47

This is fascinating, and implies that the whole process is a lot less of a PITA than it might otherwise be!

Any chance of a few photos in 'step-by-step' fashion of this part of the process sometime, please Doug?

Thanks.


I shall work double tides in the next sennight to accord with your wishes, in the meanwhile, a glass of wine with you, Sir!

Doug

#54 Benbow

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 13:48

I use this method as well and it works really well. Unfortunately my work isn't up to Doug's standard but the picture shows the result on my under construction Midford signalbox.
Roger

Windows.JPG
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#55 cornamuse

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 21:35

nice technique, and soooo much excellent modelling in this topic.

#56 Brian D

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 16:11

Dear Doug,
I have only just discovered this thread and I am inceredibly impressed with your high quality modelling in this medium. I too am a devotee of card buildings (do you think plastic mortar joints look over scale?) and heading towards a new layout in all probability to be built in a shed I am obviously concerned about damp affecting card models and therefore your hints and tips about "waterproofing" will be invaluable.
Thanks for the "master class" and I look forward to seeing further work of yours on here - stunning!
Regards,
Brian.

#57 Barnaby

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 16:49

Wow, this is something to behold indeed and it's GWR too.
Great work Doug following your build is fantastic and I must say your pics and detail sketches are extremely clear and very informative.

If there are any publishers out there who need a writer / illustrator they need look no further.
How about a small build of something complete with sketches etc for MI our e-mag?

Looking forward to the next installment.

Best regards
Mark

#58 Chubber

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 19:27

C. B. & B., thank you for all your kind remarks, it's very encouraging.

Tim, I haven't forgotten a 'How to' for the windows, but recently I have gutted the power supply for our cravan, designed a new one and incorporated a battery with charging via the car alternator. This sounds pretty standard for UK spec vans but is far from the norm here in France. I find it difficult to model when a comparatively large investment lies in a semi-eviscerated state!

Doug

#59 Andy M

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 10:41

Doug,

I feel I must echo the comments about how fantastic your modelling looks and what an advert for the use of brickpapers as a medium. Your 'how to' commentary is also amongst the best so far seen on RMWeb.

Regards,

Andy.

#60 Mucky Duck

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 13:28

Complete modelling; beautifully observed, modelled, photographed - and illustrated

#61 taddies2

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 20:33

I use this method as well and it works really well. Unfortunately my work isn't up to Doug's standard but the picture shows the result on my under construction Midford signalbox.
Roger

Windows.JPG

I also use this meathod only I use 50mm white insulating tape and when you get arched windows it is the only way I find of doing the job

#62 HARRYMALLARD

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 17:33

One question
How did you make the coats a the back of the interior wall?
Harry

#63 Chubber

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 07:03

One question
How did you make the coats a the back of the interior wall?
Harry


Hi, Harry!

I cut outthe shape of a 'bumfreezer' jacket and a pair of overalls from cooking foil, crumpled them slightly, then flattened them out, painted them with matt enamel and glued them to the wall.......Simples [insert annoying Meerkat noise] :)

Doug

#64 Barnaby

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 14:05

Simples...... a bit of foil some paint and viola>>> so good it got shown twice

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  • foil jacket.jpg

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#65 cornamuse

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 20:11

amazing work, with photography to match. such an atmospheric picture!

:good:

#66 wootang

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 08:51

cant wait until its got a small western tank engine stood there with it coal stage and water tower next is it haha

anyway a stunning building

#67 BRealistic

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 21:17

Hi Doug

I'm in the early stages of building myself a single-road, GWR-friendly, shed.... with the surviving stone buildings at Newton Abbot my inspiration (Gonna employ a Das and foamboard construction). Just need to decide on dimensions... and, as well as looking superb, yours looks to be 'spot on'. So, I'd be chuffed if you could confirm the length, width and height (to ridge... I saw the eaves height was 56mm) of the actual shed portion.

If it goes well I might post it!

Cheers

#68 Chubber

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:13

Hullo Alan,

My model is 173mm long to the back wall of the shed, the office is another 37mm to suit my location rather than the 54mm it should be and height to the ridge is 90mm. Plinths are 1 brick and 1.5 bricks extra at 10mm high.

Beware, these dimensions may not suit a stone built bulding as the footings and columns would have different proportions. If you are not trying rivet counting [or should that be 'brick counting] that won't matter too much, but why don't you look at the Scalescenes small shed which can be built with or without the water tank?

Good luck,

Doug

#69 iL Dottore

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:17

Hi, David, these days I tend to make windows such as these by printing out an outline onto self-adhesive paper, sticking it to acrylic sheet, or CD case plastic, and then cutting out the panes of glass and picking them off with a pair of tweezers. There is no need to cut individual panes out, simply run a new [sharp] scalpel blade right across the full width of the windows, the tiny squares of sticky paper remain stuck in the interstices quite well. For white frames such as these, I print out in a pale grey colour so that any slight mis-cutting doesn't show up rudely as were the case if I had printed in black. Clearly, you can print in any colour window frame you want....

This is an VERY helpful technique and one I have just used (on the Halwill Goods Shed windows) and it went very smoothly and much faster than mucking around with plastic strip on clear plastic (given that one mistake with a piece of plastic strip means scrapping the entire window). I too used grey (basically as I wanted to start with a grubby window frame), I did, however refine the technique from that described by adding red dotted-line guidelines for the metal straight edge (see image).
Window Sketch.jpg (you do have to play around with your design programme [I used powerpoint] to ensure the red-dotted guidelines are hidden behind the window frames),
Additionally, once I lifted the individual squares of sticky paper, I burnished the frames to ensure that they were seated firmly on the clear plastic (I used one of the dental tools I "acquired" [hem-hem] from my dentist).

I'm not giving up on etched brass windows just yet, but for rapid production of a small number of unusual/non-standard windows this is a brilliant solution.

F
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#70 Chubber

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 08:34

This is an VERY helpful technique I'm not giving up on etched brass windows just yet, but for rapid production of a small number of unusual/non-standard windows this is a brilliant solution.

F


Hi, Doc,

Glad it has helped, it just semed the simplest way after spending hours and hours cutting out [and coc%ing up] windows from matt photopaper for my Welsh warehouse! The breakthrough came when I used a little piece of the self-adhesive paper address labeling that comes in Amazon book deliveries for return addresses to make some window bars.....


Doug

#71 BRealistic

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 14:11

Thanks for the measurements, Doug. The length of 173mm surprised me, as I imagined it was going to be something over 200mm, akin to the Hornby 4 window GWR R9667 (200mm) or even the Bachmann 44-007, which extends to 225mm). The nice Scalescenes shed you mention (4 windows RO22?) is an in-between 197mm. You didn't mention the width, but I'm presuming it's around 80mm, as per the Scalescenes, while the Bachmann 44-007 is bigger again at 100mm.

The reason for my wanting a 200mm length is to accommodate the up-coming Hornby 72xx, which I've gathered will be 180mm.

By the way, here's a couple of photos of the elevations at Newton Abbot that have inspired me. Part of the surviving works, if not the shed.

001.jpg

002.jpg

003.jpg

#72 Chubber

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Posted 02 August 2012 - 15:16

Hi again, Alan,

The shed was GWR contractor built to suit the locos on the Wallingford branch line, i.e. 14xx, 517 , 850 and 48xx classes. I'm sure the design was never meant to have 'biggies' in it! They would have been shedded at Swindon, probably as Wallingford was an 'outshed' for Swindon. When sizing the shed, remember to get a measurement over the length of the couplings, not just over the buffers...

[The Wallingford Branch, Paul Karay ISBN0 906867 10 X]

Doug

PS Forgot to add that I am having a bit of 'eye problem' and may not be posting very much here for a few days.

Edited by Chubber, 02 August 2012 - 15:32 .


#73 Benbow

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 17:26

Hi Doug
Sorry to hear about the eye problem, hope you get better soon.
Regards
Roger

#74 Chubber

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 20:19

Hi Doug
Sorry to hear about the eye problem, hope you get better soon.
Regards
Roger


Thank you, Roger,
Much improved, though still not driving as I'd be swerving around 'tadpoles'! Reasonably OK for close up things now so doing a bit of modelling,

Best wishes,

Doug

#75 BRealistic

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 11:28

Hi Doug

Hope you don't mind me giving your topic a 'bump', but I've a question to ask about something you haven't (yet!) alluded to, and that's how (and at what stage) you went about marrying the shed to it's base... the base being the subject of much modelling, including the incorporation of the inspection pit and the raising of the floor/ground to 'rail-top' level.

I'm in the middle (well, nearer the start!) of making my 'stone-built' shed using DAS amongst other things (which I mentioned in post 71 above... with photos of the 'prototype' I'm basing it on) and have got to the stage when I need to stick the walls together in order to 'DAS and scribe' the 4 corners. Here's a pic of the two long sides, which still need a bit of tinkering.

Z02 Dec 2012.jpg


Thing is, I'd like to attach the walls to a base at the same time to give them a bit of rigidity as I'll be man-handing them quite a lot.... and I'm beginning to think my best bet is to model the base before doing this so they become 'a unit'. Then I wonder, how on earth will I be able to attach the track in the base to the track on the baseboard... and knit the ground forms together without leaving 'obvious' joins. All very challenging (like the model itself!) but knowng how the master (that's you!) proceeded will, I am sure, be a tremendous help!

Very best wishes... and here's hoping your eyes are now back to 20/20!

PS I'll be incorporating an inspection pit just inside the door... and an ash pit a little way out front. I've 'done' the insides of the walls with 'No More Cracks' filler... but won't be 'fully detailing' like yours.

Edited by BRealistic, 04 December 2012 - 11:34 .

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