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#30251 Enterprisingwestern

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Posted Today, 11:37

Not cheap? No kidding!

 

They must be cheap, it says only!

 

Mike.


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#30252 Denbridge

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Posted Today, 11:51

Viessmann part 4551 http://www.gaugemast...asp?code=VN4551 (other suppliers are available). Not cheap but very good.
 
Edit: Frank beat me to it!

£18.99 at Kernow. As I discovered the day after I bought 6 from gaugemaster.
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#30253 Tony Wright

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Posted Today, 12:07

A couple of months ago I started the London Road Models J5 kit. It has very recently been released. I still regard myself very much as a beginner in etched brass construction and I take my hat off to all of you who have been doing it for years. During the build, I had 'a fall'. I only put it that way because I'm over 65. In reality I was showing off by running down from the bus stop to the corner to see if the bus was coming when I tripped over at full pelt and smashed my skull against a paving slab in a whiplash type of movement. I can't believe how well I've recovered. I think Chris (my other half) is a little disappointed that my character didn't change a bit for the better after my head injury but unfortunately, I'm still the same person. Anyway, I digress...

This kit has the makings of a very good kit but as it stands, there are 3 or 4 dimensional errors in the etchings which (don't quote me on this) I believe is being addressed by the kit's designer, Paul Craig who I think is looking at the possibility of a supplementary etch to the kit containing the corrected parts. Anyway, I've managed to get round these problems with the parts supplied and the kit is now just about constructionally complete. The only remaining item to add is the engine/tender connection. In the kit this connection has been designed in a permanent arrangement which goes against my predilection to be able to separate engine from tender easily for servicing and maintenance. But I haven't yet decided on just how I'll do it.

A quick note on the prototype. It's not the most well-known locomotive class and to be honest I was fairly surprised when I learned London Road were doing it.

The J5s were Ivatt's first stab at a fast mixed traffic locomotive but it was pretty well immediately superseded by his piston valve version (the J6), and only 20 J5s were built. Both the J5 and the J6 were classified J22 under the Great Northern. The class mainly operated in the Southern section of the GN around Retford, Colwick and Peterborough but by the late 1940s the class congregated at Colwick, Nottingham. The engines were all withdrawn 1953 to 1955. The J5 was the first locomotive I could distinguish as a 3 year old when my brother who was 10 years older than me took me linesiding in the pushchair. He got me into railways from the word go. We called the J5s 'coffee-pots' due to their long chimneys, but he knew all the correct classifications as well. 

Here are some pictures of her. 65498 was one of the last 2 withdrawn in December 1955. 

I have to say I made a number of rookie errors during this build but learnt a lot during the process. This proves that the journey can be just as enlightening as the destination.

Splendid work, Clem,

 

Thanks for posting.

 

Your pictures show an interesting feature (actually, they show loads) - the breather cones still in the bunker space. Post-War any Ivatt tender 0-6-0s would have lost their water pick-up apparatus, but, in many cases, the cone vents were left on the tenders. I fell into the trap once of, seeing these, I assumed water pick-up gear was still present on a J6 tender - I fitted it; in error! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 


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#30254 Tony Wright

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Posted Today, 12:16

They must be cheap, it says only!

 

Mike.

For a high-quality product, 'good value' is probably a fair description, Mike.

 

As I've already mentioned however, they are incredibly sensitive. As part of our bartering, Graham Nicholas built a signal and installed all the operating mechanisms for the main line ones on LB. Thus far, about four/five Veissmann units have failed. Graham has replaced them all. We think they failed because their adjustment was not quite spot-on. By that I mean it would appear that, although the signal arm had apparently moved from 'on' to 'off' (and vice versa), electricity was still being fed to one of the poles. Thus, in time, they just 'cooked'. Not dangerously, but enough to destroy the solenoid.  

 

I believe Graham has had one or two fail on Grantham in this manner. 

 

Since the problem has been identified, no more failures have occurred, and they do work beautifully. 


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#30255 Lecorbusier

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Posted Today, 12:20

 

I have to say I made a number of rookie errors during this build but learnt a lot during the process. This proves that the journey can be just as enlightening as the destination.

Looks smashing to me ... what a characterful little engine - excellent.

 

....... now for the paint shop.


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#30256 Tony Wright

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Posted Today, 12:21

As part of my demonstration of building plastic rolling stock kits at Peterborough, I dug out an old Kirk Gresley, and started to build it.

 

It's now complete, apart from painting/glazing.

 

Kirk Gresley TK 01.jpg

 

It would seem that these old kits (because they're no longer produced?) are 'desirable', and command high-ish prices on ebay. I still think they're still all right (apart from the armoured sides), and, certainly, an end-door TK is not made by Hornby. I've replaced several of the plastic components with metal items, though I've used the plastic bogies (unusual for me). It runs very well.

 

We'll see what it looks like once I've painted it. 


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#30257 31A

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Posted Today, 13:39

A couple of months ago I started the London Road Models J5 kit. It has very recently been released. I still regard myself very much as a beginner in etched brass construction and I take my hat off to all of you who have been doing it for years. During the build, I had 'a fall'. I only put it that way because I'm over 65. In reality I was showing off by running down from the bus stop to the corner to see if the bus was coming when I tripped over at full pelt and smashed my skull against a paving slab in a whiplash type of movement. I can't believe how well I've recovered. I think Chris (my other half) is a little disappointed that my character didn't change a bit for the better after my head injury but unfortunately, I'm still the same person. Anyway, I digress...

 

 

 

That sounds frightful Clem; hope you soon make a good recovery!

 

The J5 is looking good ....


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#30258 jwealleans

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Posted Today, 14:20

Easier done in the flat, Tony, but replacing the moulded door handles and adding MJT commode handles lifts these vehicles disproportionately.

Replacing the undergubbins with MJT/Comet bits also ballasts them just where they need it. The bogies are surprisingly good but we've found with the ones we run at Ormesby Hall that they fail after a few years use. All the Grantham ones have MJT bogies.

Edited by jwealleans, Today, 14:33 .

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#30259 Tony Wright

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Posted Today, 15:54

Easier done in the flat, Tony, but replacing the moulded door handles and adding MJT commode handles lifts these vehicles disproportionately.

Replacing the undergubbins with MJT/Comet bits also ballasts them just where they need it. The bogies are surprisingly good but we've found with the ones we run at Ormesby Hall that they fail after a few years use. All the Grantham ones have MJT bogies.

Thanks Jonathan,

 

I replaced the handles on the triplet set I built recently. That, of course, had heavy-duty replacement white metal bogies.

 

I think these old Kirkies look better in teak than they do in maroon (and certainly in carmine/cream) because the thick window reveals aren't as noticeable, or, at least, not in my view. 

 

I suppose if someone were to reintroduce the range they'd sell well. As reported earlier, un-built triplet sets sell on ebay for well in excess of £100.00. I find this weird, because a Comet triplet is probably less than that. However, folk fight shy of making things in brass if there's something in plastic available.

 

Do you know who has the moulds at the moment? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 



#30260 uax6

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Posted Today, 16:29

Aren't the moulds in the black hole of Coopercraft? And sort of modified to fit a machine that doesn't work?

 

Andy G



#30261 MikeTrice

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Posted Today, 16:32

Tony, another simple improvement is to have a close look at the window apertures. You will note that they have a draft built in to help remove from the moulds. This does not help the visible thickness of the sides.

 

Assuming you have not painted the coach yet, file out the window apertures to remove the draft.

 

Left as supplied, right after treatment:

kirksides.JPG

 

The right hand coach has also had the moulded draft removed from the top of the sides and a strip of styrene added to make the sides taller then fitted with a MJT roof. The MJT roof makes the coach appear less top heavy.

 

Fitting the MJT roof completely changes to appearance of the ends as can be seen here. The original moulded ends are simply filled with filler (and not very well either):

kirkends.JPG


Edited by MikeTrice, Today, 16:38 .

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#30262 uax6

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Posted Today, 17:10

The subtle change in the profile to the MJT roof is very noticeable. That MJT bloke is a damn good modeller.....

 

Andy G


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#30263 Tony Wright

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Posted Today, 19:21

I think many 4mm modellers of the LNER and BR ER/NER/ScR should be very grateful for the Ian Kirk Gresleys down the decades (and not just those railways/regions, because the Gresley cars got all over the country).

 

I've certainly used them, though not so much since etched brass equivalents became available.

 

 scarborough flyer rear.jpg

 

A Kirk Gresley FK was used in The Scarborough Flyer on Stoke Summit for years, coupled to an MTK (yes, MTK!) RTO. Both have now been sold-on.

 

60905.jpg

 

Other, now sold-on Kirk carriages can be distinguished in this very mixed set operating on Stoke Summit. It's now over 23 years since this very successful exhibition layout first made its appearance. 

 

Trains running 03 ROBERT THE DEVIL on Down express.jpg

 

This summer also saw a very successful LNER weekend on Little Bytham. This train is principally Jonathan Wealleans' work, and I'm sure he's used some Kirk kits in it.

 

Trains running 11 D9.jpg

 

The last carriage in this train of otherwise-modified Hornby vehicles is a Kirk non-gangwayed BT.

 

I think that Kirk Gresleys still have their place today. A pity they're no longer available. 

 

Does anyone else have examples of them, please? 


Edited by Tony Wright, Today, 19:23 .

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#30264 thegreenhowards

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Posted Today, 19:49

Good afternoon Andy,
 
Mechanising signals?
 
With particular thanks to Graham Nicholas, the main line signals on LB are driven by Weisseman dampened solenoids. 
 
They work beautifully, but they are very sensitive and need to be adjusted exactly. 
 
attachicon.gifSignals 05.jpg
 
attachicon.gifSignals 06.jpg
 
attachicon.gifSignals 07.jpg
 
attachicon.gifSignals 09.jpg
 
How they work is explained in my Crowood book.


Thanks Tony,

I’ve now looked up the reference in your book which is helpful, but the Viessmanns are quite expensive, especially once you add on MSE parts. Would they be suitable for motorising Ratio signals, or are they too fragile for motorisation?

I’m going to start with a couple of Dapol SR lattice signals which look very good. I’ll see how that goes, and then I might try something more adventurous.

Andy

#30265 Tony Wright

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Posted Today, 20:46

Thanks Tony,

I’ve now looked up the reference in your book which is helpful, but the Viessmanns are quite expensive, especially once you add on MSE parts. Would they be suitable for motorising Ratio signals, or are they too fragile for motorisation?

I’m going to start with a couple of Dapol SR lattice signals which look very good. I’ll see how that goes, and then I might try something more adventurous.

Andy

Andy,

 

I don't know if I'm the right guy to ask the question about motorising Ratio signals. I assume you mean the plastic LNER lattice types? 

 

I built one or two some years ago, but could never get them to work properly, even using simple mechanics. A bracket distant worked for a while (using the cranks supplied) but the signals are so vulnerable to the slightest damage that I gave up. One thing I did do (heresy!) was to convert some old Hornby-Dublo signals I had to lattice types by painting the posts matt black and then sticking the Ratio lattice on top of them, even adding the finial to the top. I lopped off the huge HD counterweights, and the signals were made to work with simple wire cranks. I used them on my original Soke Summit with some limited success. From a distance (great?), they looked passable, and were far more robust.  

 

I don't think the Viessmanns will damage any signals (probably the other way round), so I'd just try it and see what happens. LB's signals are all-metal, of course, and quite robust. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 



#30266 Tony Wright

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Posted Today, 20:50

I've just had a request for information about Essendine South signal box. 

 

In the spirit of asking questions on this thread, can anyone help with pictures or references, please? I have none immediately to hand.

 

In my days of taking Modern Railways, I seem to recall a picture shot at Essendine of a new Brush Type 4 passing the 'box on a freight train. It would be sometime in 1963.  

 

Thanks in anticipation. 


Edited by Tony Wright, Today, 20:51 .