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Bridge Construction part 2


wenlock

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Once I was happy with the overall size and shape of the bridge, the underside of the arches, parapets and abutments could be tackled. South Eastern Finecast brick embossed sheet was wrapped around a curved former of a suitable diameter (Empty bottle of Aussie red wine!), then placed in a bowl of boiling water and allowed to cool. Once back to room temperature the sheet stayed in a reasonable curve and was glued to the underside of the bridge side walls. Flat embossed plasticard sheet was also cut to fit and glued in position to form the vertical side walls.

 

Underside of brick arches

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I wanted the finished bridge to have sloping side retaining walls, so the bridge width was increased to accommodate this. Abutment piers were cut from more plastic card sheet and Liquid Poly was used to glue them either side of the bridge.

 

Abutment piers from bridge rear

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Abutment piers from front

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5mm thick foam board was glued using cyanoacrylate, to the inside surfaces of the bridge parapets to give the require thickness for the finished wall. 20 thou plain plasticard was then glued to the other side of the foam board, before using liquid poly to glue curved brick embossed strips to the road side of the bridge parapets.

 

Foam board glued to bridge parapets

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Curved brick overlay strips in position

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The sloping retaining walls were then cut out from embossed sheet and glued in position onto the abutments. Once this had dried cap stones were cut from a couple of layers of 40 thou sheet and glued in position on top of the main abutment piers. Capping stones were scribed onto a strip of 40 thou plasticard and then glued on top of the parapet walls. I decided some small brick piers would finish of the sloping wing walls, so these were fabricated from the embossed plasticard sheet and glued in position.

 

Sloping retaining walls

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End brick piers and capping stones

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The bridge was then placed back onto the layout to check that it would still fit in position and had the required clearances.

 

Bridge in situ on layout

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Once the construction phase of the bridge was completed, painting could begin. I like to use enamels for painting on plastic and started by painting a base coat of brick red (Humbrol 100) over all the surfaces.

 

Brick red base coat

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Once the brick red enamel had dried for 24 hours, the whole bridge was painted with dark grey mortar colour enamel paint and allowed to partially dry for an hour.

 

Grey mortar paint

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Once an hour had elapsed the majority of the grey paint was removed from the surface of the brickwork using kitchen roll soaked in enamel thinners. The brick embossing helps the grey paint stay in the mortar courses, this is definitely a job best done outside in the fresh air!

 

Grey paint partially removed

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In Situ on layout

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I plan on picking out some of the bricks in a warmer red colour to give a bit of variety and this along with a bit of strategically placed vegetation should help with the bridges final appearance. I thought I'd finish this blog post with a few gratuitous pictures of my Dean goods!

 

Dean Goods posing "underneath the arches!"

 

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Best wishes

 

Dave

  • Like 13
  • Craftsmanship/clever 2

14 Comments


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As with all your architectural stuff, this is impressive modelling Dave, and it's amazing how a little colour starts brings it all to life, even at this stage. 

 

Gratuitous pictures of your Dean Goods are always welcome!

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Adrian is correct, that Dean Goods is nice; you could do better only by building an Armstrong Goods... then again I am biased.

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  • RMweb Gold

That is cracking Dave, looks really good. I hope I can replicate your standards in 4mm!

 

Regards,

 

Nick.

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Dave,

Lovely modelling (as usual)!!  The bridge is really coming along very nicely.

 

I think we can all forgive the gratuitous posing of your Dean Goods :-)  It would be nice to see your (rather shy) Metro Tank posing too :-)

 

Regards,

Ian

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  • RMweb Gold

Thanks all, glad you like the progress so far!

 

I'm glad the Dean Goods went down well, i'm afraid I couldn't resist! An Armstrong Goods is definitely on my wish list, I just need to find a decent kit of one to build. Scorpio models do one but I'm not sure how accurate it is and how well it goes together.

 

I'll do my best to persuade my shrinking violet Metro to come out from the shadows in the next set of pictures!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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  • RMweb Gold

That's very neat indeed. You have an extraordinary eye for making structures look like they are based on a particular prototype, while still retaining the freedom and flexibility of a might-have-been. I know that a lot of it comes from research, but your skills plays a big part too.

 

Another vote here for an Armstrong Goods!

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  • RMweb Gold

Thanks Mikkel, that's very flattering and much appreciated! I thoroughly enjoy planning "might have been" buildings, so Im delighted you think they look convincing. I think the finished layout will have shades of Hemyock, Arley and a touch of Ruyton Road about it! I've got a scene in my head that I hope I can do justice to, I guess only time will tell!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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  • RMweb Gold

The bridge has come on really well and the Dean goods is a beauty. Is that from the Finney Kit?I have one put by.

Don

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  • RMweb Gold

The bridge has come on really well and the Dean goods is a beauty. Is that from the Finney Kit?I have one put by.

Don

Thanks Don, glad you like the bridge! Yes the Dean's from a Finney Kit. It builds really nicely with all the parts fitting well. I documented its construction earlier in the blog if you're interested.

 

Dave

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This is just what I require if I need to build (and I think it will be a need, to fit the space I have) a bridge similar to this. Your pictures speak a hundred words and the use of identified materials is very helpful.

Many thanks

Phil

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  • RMweb Gold
On 19/02/2019 at 19:07, Mallard60022 said:

This is just what I require if I need to build (and I think it will be a need, to fit the space I have) a bridge similar to this. Your pictures speak a hundred words and the use of identified materials is very helpful.

Many thanks

Phil

Glad it’s of use Phil:-)  I hope you build goes well.

  • Thanks 1
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