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Oxford Diecast Fowler Ploughing Engine. Photograph Only.

Mick Bonwick

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Another little test for those of you who wonder what this weathering lark is all about. This Oxford Diecast Fowler Ploughing Engine was chosen as a weathering subject after I was inspired by seeing the real thing at the Bloxham Steam Rally last month.

 

What was used to create the weathering effects?

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Great job Mick, what was used? A lot of skill would be my answer.

 

I suspect however, that the one you saw at Bloxham was much more like the un-weathered version.

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Another masterpiece! 

I'm going for Dullcote followed by some Dark Earth and Smoke weathering powders then some other oily bits all put on very sparingly?

Steve.

 

 

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54 minutes ago, nickwood said:

Great job Mick, what was used? A lot of skill would be my answer.

 

I suspect however, that the one you saw at Bloxham was much more like the un-weathered version.

 

Not entirely.

20190630_123800.jpg

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15 hours ago, Mick Bonwick said:

It's a quiz, but without prizes. :P

Bu**er.

I'd go with Dullcote, a light airbrushing in track dirt or similar on the wheel treads and in a stripe down the boiler from the chimney, plus powders to complete - black smoke & dark earth.

Tony

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Full list of products used:

 

Testor's Dullcote to get rid of the high gloss shine of the original model.

Dark Earth pigment to represent old dried mud.

Track Rust pigment to represent rusty areas.

Tyre Black acrylic paint for the rubber pads on the wheels.

Europe Earth pigment for lighter dust and dirt deposits, especially on the wheels.

Gunmetal pigment to highlight areas of clean but oily mechanism.

Light Dust enamel wash for dust in crooks and nannies. This was probably a step too far, but I left it in place rather than remove it and, probably, other layers as well.

 

All of this was done in small quantities, building up effects one at a time.

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NHY 581

Posted (edited)

Morning Mick. 

 

I have a factory applied 'very rusty' version of this chap. 

You seem to have inspired me to have a go at mine. 

 

One's thoughts are somewhat provoked....

 

I do of course note the digit in the photo of the prototype......nice example of nudging. 

 

Rob 

Edited by NHY 581
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Hello Mick, I always look forward to your projects, hopefully I'm learning a bit. One question, do you ever use airbrushed matt varnish for he base coat? Is it just that Dullcote is the best product?

If you're bored and need an idea, I'd like to see how you transform a bog standard out of the box vent van ;-) 

Steve.

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I was going to say 'gravy granules and household dust'...

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55 minutes ago, Stubby47 said:

I was going to say 'gravy granules and household dust'...

 

You can say whatever you like, it's of no matter to me. :lol: That's an interesting idea, though, and maybe the subject of a future article. Not on this forum, though. . . . . . . . . .

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2 hours ago, NHY 581 said:

 

I do of course note the digit in the photo of the prototype......nice example of nudging. 

 

 

I still haven't got the hang of this smartphone thing that I was using at the show. I have several other fingered shots like it, so I'm convinced that the lens moves around the casing of its own free will.

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1 hour ago, sb67 said:

One question, do you ever use airbrushed matt varnish for he base coat? Is it just that Dullcote is the best product?

 

 

Hi Steve. I have used airbrushed varnish (AMMO by MIG Lucky Varnish), but came back to Dullcote. For me, it has always worked, it is consistent in its performance and is so convenient.

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On 07/08/2019 at 05:35, NHY 581 said:

 

You seem to have inspired me to have a go at mine. 

 

 

Make sure we see the results, Rob, and no being sheepish about it.

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The wheels on the Oxford Diecast model represent steel strakes, not rubber, so these would be slightly metallic finish, if the engine were working on stony ground.  Solid rubber tyres are a feature of preservation, usually liberated from heavy plant. 

 

Tim

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