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An eminent discussion; and learned indeed; conducted in most gentlemanly (and dare I say it, ladylike) fashion.

 

Such civil yet entertaining exchanges are a fine example to us all Sir!

 

If this discourse is available in wax cylinder format with illustrative Daguerreotype's I for one will be most obliged should care to you send me further details.

 

Yours most faithfully,

 

 

S. Boy Esq.

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:lol: Now that's the style this should have been written in! I did try initially, but found I couldn't do it (whereas the cave-man's lines came easy :D).

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Mikkel - A refreshing alternative for a blog entry - really enjoyed to read it - BTW, hope your throat gets better too - Pete

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As someone who has claimed in the past to have artistic inclinations, I'd have to say that it is an art form... the only problem in gaining artistic acceptance is that it is just too accesible and immediate. A nice working model can inspire all sorts of people, young, old or whatever, and stop them in their tracks, no matter their basic level of interest. To be 'art', does a model have to appeal to a narrower audience to the expense of others?

 

PS... would love to see this (by Turner)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/Turner-rain-steam-and-speed.jpg

 

expressed as a three dimensional model... In fact, Mikkel, looks like your kind of thing! :D

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Interesting. I agree that exclusivity shouldn't be a criteria in defining art. I just hesitate to call it art in the classic sense because it seems to involve more than that, including craft and engineering and design etc etc. As I see it, railway modelling simply evades definition?

 

I do think the distinction between different overall styles in realism, impressionism and expressionism are quite recognizable in railway modelling though.

 

That Turner painting is amazing. Not sure how to do it in 3D though! :)

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I would like to expound to you a phenomenon of singular appreciation gratitude for the jovial nature of your most recent contribution. Such merriment and accurate unboundless observation! Please do so continue to elaborate on this fascinating gesture of impressionism and realism.

 

 

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I just hesitate to call it art in the classic sense because it seems to involve more than that, including craft and engineering and design etc etc.

It's most like, IMO, the form of modern art that involves installations - the kind of art you immerse yourself into. These also incorporate elements of craft, engineering and design.

 

So, we are all modern installation artists! (Where does that leave those steam modellers though, that's hardly modern ;) :lol: )

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Ok, I've looked hard at pictures of the Farthing layouts but can't seem to find where the Hairy Gentleman is. :D

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Pugsley said:

It's most like, IMO, the form of modern art that involves installations - the kind of art you immerse yourself into. These also incorporate elements of craft, engineering and design.

That's a pretty good point. Here's the Wikipedia definition of installation art:

"Installation art describes an artistic genre of site-specific, three-dimensional works designed to transform the perception of a space. Generally, the term is applied to interior spaces, whereas exterior interventions are often called Land art [...that would be garden railways!...]; however the boundaries between these terms overlap. Installation art can be either temporary or permanent. Installation artworks have been constructed in exhibition spaces such as museums and galleries, as well as public- and private spaces. The genre incorporates a very broad range of everyday and natural materials, which are often chosen for their evocative qualities..."

Sounds a lot like railway modelling to me! (for steam, just add "Retro"-) :) .

 

 

57xx said:
Ok, I've looked hard at pictures of the Farthing layouts but can't seem to find where the Hairy Gentleman is. :D

Well he only comes out on special occasions. He can be very useful, though, for sniffing out plain-clothes staff from the LSWR drawing office!

 

1416950822_blogentry-738-0993474001289339458.jpg.3bbea0e63cbb1f2f46547673fdef5e82.jpg

 

 

Edited by Mikkel
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Im hoping its not art, mainly because art is often only appreciated once the creator is DEAD !! blink.gifrolleyes.gifbiggrin.gif

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Uh-oh, you have a point there, John :blink:

 

But at least we can call ourselves unrecognized geniuses? :D

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This summer a saw an interview with a famous trend watcher. She proclaimed that artist are the mirror of society.

 

Art now a days has a lot of faces, one of them could be railway modelling in all aspects. There are beautiful models of locomotives, bridges and so on in museums. 

 

Your strip conversation is maybe in the future a item on "Christie's" for those who like strips.

 

Let's think about that:

 

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/53.183

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Hi Job, how about this:

 

Wikipedia: "The RMweb Generation" [last updated: May 3rd, 2063]

 

"The RMweb generation" was a school of artists who spawned the "Micro-Art" movement that dominated the art-world in the 2020s and 2030s. The  school gained its name from an internet forum known as "RMweb", where members created miniature 3D representations of real-world settings through the subtle blending of colour, texture and movement.

 

Members of the school were initially resistant to fame, claiming they "were just a bunch of railway modellers". However, when art collectors discovered their work and prices began soaring, most members of the movement accepted their new-found fame and started cashing in.

 

Techniques used by the RMweb Generation included:

  • "Dynamic flow" (the passing of living modules through a static scene)
  • "Flooring" (looking for lost items on the floor, as a representation of the individual's search for meaning and identity in postmodern complexity)
  • "Swearing" (giving alternative meanings to silent objects)
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Exhibition Farting Art Gallery (1st May - 1st June,2064)

 

The much-loved English modeler Mikkel is the focus of this exhibition at the Farting Art Gallery, which seeks to re-appraise the artist for a new and extended audience.

Bringing together around 50 works, including Mikkel's own historical Farthing diorama's Farthing Bay  and The Sidings , the show explores how Mikkel became Britain's pre-eminent modeler of RMweb generation .

On display are also urban diorama's representing the late 1950's  and other railway related diorama's from other members of the RMweb school.

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Ahem, now this is getting a bit fictional :-)

 

It is amazing how much railway modelling has moved forward in the past 10-15 years. Looking at old magazines like Railway Modeller, the 1990s seem a very long way away!  Yes there were amazing modellers even in the 1940s, but there has been a general advance in methods and appearance by ordinary modellers like us, I think.

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