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Wellington Street


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Over the past few years I've really enjoyed not only learning more about British railways and railway modelling, but, to use a term, "all things British."  I have to say some of the names of small local pubs are interesting on so many levels and I often wonder what the background of the name is.  History based? local economy based? just a guy with a great sense of humor? I love it!  Did the Duke actually visit the area or actually grab a drink there?  Mike's level of modelling makes such imagination trips that much more enjoyable!!  

Sort of off-topic, (Sorry).. but just to add to Dave's list of pub names .. one of my Aunts ran a pub during the '39/'45 war years called "The Fortune of War".  A genuine "Spit & Sawdust" establishment, it had bare wooden floors with a dusting of sawdust and enameled cast iron Spitoons at strategic intervals !!  I have not been able to find the reason for the name. It was however in the same Black Country area that Wellington Street depicts and in a heavily industrialised district. Along with the Forges and Hammer mills it no longer exists.

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"Fortune of War" Dudley Street Round Oak just up the bank(bonk) from the Duke. Dave the pub is named after The Duke of Wellington (the Iron Duke)who defeated Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo  a national hero who went on to become Prime Minister. He never visited the area but the Pub along with many others was named in his honour Thanks for your generous comments I really appreciate them.

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Didn't know about the "Fortune of War" pub at Round Oak,... My Aunt's was at Darlaston Rd., Wednesbury. the floor shook with the vibrations from the Steam Hammers at the adjacent factory.

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Curtains and brass poles plus some rather nice resin figures and packing cases from Atelier Belle Epoque. What is a big help is the colour photos and Humbrol Paint numbers.

 

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Sort of off-topic, (Sorry).. but just to add to Dave's list of pub names .. one of my Aunts ran a pub during the '39/'45 war years called "The Fortune of War".  A genuine "Spit & Sawdust" establishment, it had bare wooden floors with a dusting of sawdust and enameled cast iron Spitoons at strategic intervals !!  I have not been able to find the reason for the name. It was however in the same Black Country area that Wellington Street depicts and in a heavily industrialised district. Along with the Forges and Hammer mills it no longer exists.

 

More Off topic.  Some 20 years ago I did some work in Bradford for Yorkshire Water, and I had a pint of bitter at a pub called "Shoulder of Mutton".  Only reason I walked into the place was because I thought the name was so completely bizarre...

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A whole book could be written, and probably has been, about pub names. Some are commonplace, like the King's Head. Some are truly obscure one-offs. Like the one in Stalybridge named 'Q'. I believe it's quite an old name too, not an attempt to be trendy.

 

The Iron Duke is a good example of one relating to national hero. See also the Marquis of Granby. Lots of pubs named after him, although he's largely forgotten.

 

Others relate to sport, including sports now banned; The Cock; The Greyhound; The Nag's Head, for example.

 

Often they are named after the local gentry. The Tempest Arms, for example, Tempest being a family name.

 

Or to trades: The Plasterers Arms, The Colliers Arms.

 

This is just brushing the surface. But it's worth remembering that even small towns used to have dozens of pubs, so there had to be variety to distinguish them.

Edited by Poggy1165
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  • 2 weeks later...

:locomotive: Great work Mike and as always the "NAME" Jaspers is just that little bit different to make it more plausible intriguing and realistic.
 
Just got my Gauge 0 digest complete with another Small Layouts to inspire book in which are two top layouts built by yourself, congratulation's, plenty of reading over this Bank holiday weekend for me then. :sungum:
 
EDIT plus Ashwood Basin that makes 3.

Edited by Barnaby
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Thanks for the comments, you have beaten me to the punch as I am feeling chuffed if you will excuse the pun, I have actually got 3 layouts in the booklet. Ashwood Basin, Reely Grate and Primrose Hill all now owned by others. I just hope Wellington Street lives up to the hype.

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Mike,

My copy arrived this morning and congratulations to you are well in order. The booklet is excellent and worth the subscription to the GOG. It includes one of my favourite layouts, the very simple and simply built Praa Sands by Tony Collins of Andover MRS.

 

Regards,

 

Chris

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Just to echo other's sentiments Mike, congratulations on making it into the booklet, well deserved, I had a flick through earlier today, what a lovely booklet " it's to nice to be called a magazine".

 

Layouts to inspire does what is says in the title.

 

Best regards

Craig.

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Lovely work on the Iron Duke Mike it has just the right feel. I believe I've had a pint or two in there at some stage. I used to enjoy a pint of Banks. You could model the crooked house!

 

Glad to hear you are in the new booklet. (haven't received it yet).

 

The small layout books were one of the best ideas of the guild. The aim was not to tell people what to do but show a whole range of small layouts which people had actually built to inspire you to have a go. When we did book two quite a lot of the entries had been inspired by book one. Proof it worked.

 

Don

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Wellington Street update. Work in progress on the land sale wharf still lots to do, must get on with the ground cover and then start adding the details. Oh! must add the back scene boards to both ends of the layout, then rejoin the main boards and play test.

 

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Road crossing to Cradley Goods Yard and dismantled overbridge.

 

 

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OK.  This may seem like a silly question, but how does one get a copy of the "Layouts to Inspire" booklet?  From this thread alone, I'm sure a booklet filled with other such layouts would definitely be inspiring!

 

I also need to ask where you, Mike, got the figures that are present in post #131.  They look like just the type of figures that would look great inside a goods shed.

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OK.  This may seem like a silly question, but how does one get a copy of the "Layouts to Inspire" booklet?  From this thread alone, I'm sure a booklet filled with other such layouts would definitely be inspiring!

 

I also need to ask where you, Mike, got the figures that are present in post #131.  They look like just the type of figures that would look great inside a goods shed.

 

The copy of "Layouts to Inspire" was a free supplement with this latest Gauge O Guild, Gazette.

 

Jinty ;)

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The booklet has been posted to all members of the Gauge 0 guild at no additional cost other than being a member. If you join now to may be lucky and get a copy.

Don

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Jinty,

 

Ah, ok, I'll have to look into the Guild.  I've seen it referenced all the time, so I'll take a peak.  Thanks for the info!   :)

 

Mike,

 

Thanks for the link to the figures.  What grabbed my attention are the "personalities" that each seem to have.  The sculptor of those did a fantastic job.  

 

Dave

Edited by davefromacrossthepond
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Rare visitor to Wellington Street, Stourbridge 57xx propels a couple of wagons into the Coal Wharf. (Note to self; really must finish the road surface).

 

Pub and shop more or less finished, now it will be office and weighbridge for the yard to get done. First outing will be Warley N.E.C.in November with 3 bookings already for 2017.

 

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Road surfaced albeit still not quite finished but a mjor improvement to white card. Surface is sandpaper over sprayed with black and the thin washes of grey. Checkrails still to be weathered.

 

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Wellington Street muck about: just trying figure placement with some guy holding on to the gas lamp having staggered out of the Iron Duke, whilst another looks on somewhat bemused.

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