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Quite fabulous Ian! I love outside framed saddle tanks and yours is a little gem!

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Looks very good Ian. I like the presentation. Is that a full history of Modbury at the front?

Edited by Mikkel

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It was wonderful to see Modbury on Saturday. It looked even better than I expected and it was good to chat to Ian too.

DrDuncan

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Looks very good Ian. I like the presentation. Is that a full history of Modbury at the front?

Mikkel,

Thank you.  The front panel paperwork simply tries to describe the "funny looking track", what 2mm finescale is and how it compares to N gauge, and goes on to describe how various layout elements have been constructed (track, buildings, trees, grass, etc).

 

It was wonderful to see Modbury on Saturday. It looked even better than I expected and it was good to chat to Ian too.

DrDuncan

 

Duncan,

Thank you.  It was good to meet you (always nice to be able to put a face to a name), and thank you for the kind comments.

 

Ian

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Just found a short clip of Modbury at the Epsom & Ewell 2018 show in the following video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Fsx76gk5eA.  The footage starts at 18:00 (18 minutes into the video).  My thanks got to "Hils TheTrainLady" for including Modbury in her footage and sharing it on YouTube.

 

Ian

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Running very nicely Ian

 

Don

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Very pleased to see that clip Ian, it does add an extra dimension for those of us abroad to see it running. Looks like nice smooth action. The "mousehole" is quite effective, I hardly even noticed it despite watching the train exit directly through it. 

Edited by Mikkel

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A 'mousehole' can be well disguised if there are prominent scenic features around it which divert your eye. Nice to see the brass and nickel silver livery getting an airing!

 

Jim

 

Edited to correct predictive text (again)!

Edited by Caley Jim

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Just found a short clip of Modbury at the Epsom & Ewell 2018 show in the following video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Fsx76gk5eA.  The footage starts at 18:00 (18 minutes into the video).  My thanks got to "Hils TheTrainLady" for including Modbury in her footage and sharing it on YouTube.

 

Ian

Beautiful running qualities. Although having watched Mr & Mrs Queensquare’s 2FS layouts I’m not really surprised. Lovely stuff.

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Very pleased to see that clip Ian, it does add an extra dimension for those of us abroad to see it running. Looks like nice smooth action. The "mousehole" is quite effective, I hardly even noticed it despite watching the train exit directly through it. 

 

A 'mousehole' can be well disguised if there are prominent scenic features around it which divert your eye. Nice to see the brass and nickel silver livery getting an airing!

 

Jim

 

Edited to correct predictive text (again)!

Mikkel / Jim,

 

 

Hopefully the "mousehole" will eventually be better disguised when I put a large tree in the hedgerow bordering the corn field.  However because the trees (like all other features) are fixed in position, any positioned at the front of the layout will get in the way while I'm still working on things like trees in the wood, fencing, telegraph poles, etc so this tree will be one of the later things to get added in that area.  As for the "brass and nickel silver" livery - when you've only got 2 complete locos and 4 complete coaches it does mean that I'll have to keep running stock in "North Somerset Light Railway" livery to bolster the completed stock.  Indeed, having witnessed the interest that the paying public show in models under construction I actually think it is worthwhile having these "conversation pieces" running (especially on a layout that is operated from the viewing side).

 

Ian

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Mikkel / Jim,

 

 

Hopefully the "mousehole" will eventually be better disguised when I put a large tree in the hedgerow bordering the corn field.  However because the trees (like all other features) are fixed in position, any positioned at the front of the layout will get in the way while I'm still working on things like trees in the wood, fencing, telegraph poles, etc so this tree will be one of the later things to get added in that area.  As for the "brass and nickel silver" livery - when you've only got 2 complete locos and 4 complete coaches it does mean that I'll have to keep running stock in "North Somerset Light Railway" livery to bolster the completed stock.  Indeed, having witnessed the interest that the paying public show in models under construction I actually think it is worthwhile having these "conversation pieces" running (especially on a layout that is operated from the viewing side).

 

Ian

Looking fabulous Ian.

 

Regarding NSLR livery, I used to be wary of running locos and stock in the buff but, like you, was forced to because it was all i had. These days I have more than enough to run a reasonable service fully clothed as it where but still bring something running but unfinished as it generates a lot of interest.

It also highlights to the non-modelling visitors that things are hand made and not just taken out of a box.

 

Jerry 

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Following a discussion elsewhere on RMweb (http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/135256-gwr-lineside-fencing/) I have made a start on adding some line side fencing to Modbury.

 

Initially I did a bit of experimenting - I decided to model just the top 5 wires rather than the full 7, so made a little tufnol jig that takes 2 brass posts spaced at 36mm (i.e. 18'0") with a view to adding 2 plastic intermediate posts (at 6'0" centres) once installed on the layout.  Horizontal lines were scribed on the tufnol jig at the wire spacing, holes were drilled at one end of these lines to accept pegs around which the wires looped so that one length of wire provided 2 fencing wires. Fine slots were sawn at the other end of the scribed lines so that the wires could be secured parallel to each other while being soldered in place on the posts.

 

For the fencing wires, I acquired some 0.05mm wire (the thinnest I could find easily online) which was soldered to the posts in the jig, the whole assembly was moved along the jig so that another post could be inserted and the process repeated.  I ended up with a length of fencing about 10" long.  

 

What I discovered was that even when keeping the wire under tension as it was soldered in place I still ended up with the odd slightly slack wire.  Actually seeing the wire while trying to keep everything on the jig was a bit of an issue too!  So in retrospect I have decided to abandon the idea of having wires on my fencing and will just be planting posts at 6'0" intervals!  

 

For info, the original fencing jig looks like this :

post-12089-0-54050000-1530618064_thumb.jpg

 

The experimental fencing looks like this :

post-12089-0-32207100-1530618124_thumb.jpg

 

So having abandoned the idea of having wires on my 2mm scale fencing, I ended up making the posts from 1mm square Evergreen plastic strip, cut into ~15mm lengths with a point cut onto one end.  These were painted with Precision Paints Track Colour (Weathered Sleepers) - a grey colour, then a wash of PP Sleeper Grime was applied almost as a water colour wash to vary the colour of the posts slightly.  I will eventually apply a wash of green to the foot of the posts too with the posts in place, again to provide a bit of variety.

 

GWR Post and Wire fencing seems to have strainer posts at fairly regular intervals, and these are generally made from old "Bridge Rail", this is something that I do want to replicate on my fencing - so first I needed some Bridge Rail!

 

So to provide the strainer posts of bridge rail, I have taken some 2mm Association Flat Bottom rail :

post-12089-0-24284500-1530618487_thumb.jpg

 

And after a bit of draw filing and sanding I produced some lengths of Bridge Rail by removing the head of the rail :

post-12089-0-57506500-1530618514_thumb.jpg

 

A saw cut was made in the rail-head of the bridge rail section to allow a 45 degree bend to be made so that a diagonal support could be fabricated for the strainer post, this was soldered in place on the strainer post upright (the pair were held together in a jig of bits of spring steel wire in the end of a piece of balsa - evident in photo below) :

post-12089-0-49986200-1530618538_thumb.jpg

 

These strainer posts were painted in Precision Paints Rust, again with Sleeper Grime washes to vary the colour.

 

The final effect of putting these posts in position on the layout can be seen in this photo :

 

post-12089-0-70424300-1530618582_thumb.jpg

 

I'm quite pleased with the effect, although I intend to progress the effect further by painting a green wash on some of the posts, adding some taller dry grass around the posts and along the fence line, and obviously adding some vegetation growing up some of the posts will hopefully improve and vary the effect too.

 

Ian

 
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That looks very effective. I did use some brown cotton in 7mm but it would look like thick rope in 2mm. I think you're right to just do the posts 

 

Don

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On Connerburn I used some very fine nylon fishing line, glued to balsa posts with Evostic diluted with trichlor-ethyline (don't ask how I got hold of that!).  It was tediuos and the fumes were unpleasant, so I wouldn't do that again! The fact that the wires are missing is not noticeable and, as you say, some brambles etc growing up it in places will detract the eye.

 

Looking good as always!

 

Jim

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Hi Ian

That's looking good. If you decide to revisit wiring your posts try EZ line; it's available in the UK. It's an elastic polymer thread which comes on a reel and the elasticity deals with the sag issue and makes it very easy to put in place. The finer grade would work well in 2mmFS. It's an American product but available in the UK. I've used it for lineside wire and post fencing and also for fishing boat rigging on my 2mm layout.

 

Ian

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Another possible source for post wire for our small scale is dolls hair.  I used this for GWR post and wire fencing on Tavistock, having liberated some from a dark haired doll that my daughter was throwing out many years ago.  Its probably nylon or similar and slightly stretchy.  I set up a jig a bit like you Ian and glued it to the posts with super glue.  The end posts for each batch were metal so that they could take the strain and keep the wires stretched out and intermediate posts were plastic.  The results are visible in some of the pictures in my gallery on this site.

 

Best wishes

 

John

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And on Coldfair Green (4mm scale), we used "invisible mending thread" for wire fencing (from a decent sewing shop).  Very effective in that a line is just visible, but only just. 

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Progress on Modbury has been a little slow over the last few weeks - it's been far too warm in the shed/workshop to spend any more than an hour or so out there at a time.  However, I have now added all of the fence posts to delineate the railway land.  As described in an earlier post these were all made from 1mm square plastic rod, an apex being cut at the top end and painted a grey-brown before planting at scale 6'0" intervals.  Once all of the fencing had been installed, I applied dry grass along the fence line with 2mm static grass in a straw colour - a little PVA was brushed along short sections (about 4-6 inches) of the existing grass fibres (just generally touching the tops of the existing fibres) and the straw fibres added before the PVA dried to much.  Pre-painted strainer posts of "bridge rail" were added about every 50 posts.

 

I've also adde the yard gates.  These started off as laser cut items from York Models that I'd picked up from the York show while we were exhibiting St. Ruth earlier this year.  The York Models gates are designed to be laminated together to provide a pair of gates that really didn't suit what I had in mind but they provided a good starting point.  I took one of the laminations that provided the top and bottom rails with diagonal supporting struts, and glued a load of 0.010" x 0.020" palings onto the rails (the palings had been cut with little pointed apexes).  These were added over length at the bottom and trimmed to size once dry.

post-12089-0-81776600-1531940464_thumb.jpg

 

Once complete, the gates were separated (they are provided as a pair of closed gates).  The posts beefed up by adding a post lamination on front and back (supplied in kit), and once dry filed to a pyramid shape.  The finished gates were painted white, and touched in black to represent where the hinges would be (the hinges are not represented in the kit so I just painted a representation on).  A 0.5mm wire was inserted into the bottom of each post to make securing to the layout easier.

post-12089-0-15969000-1531940745_thumb.jpg

 

Finally, taking inspiration from Dave Stone's (Wenlock) Sherton Abbas blog, I've also added a couple of coal heaps towards the end of the long back siding.  The area around the coal heaps has been blended in with dust from a black pastel.

 

To add further interest to that area, I've also taken one of my 3D printed outside frames vans, cut out one of the doors and added a new plasticard one in an open position, the moulded underframe was filed away and the van placed on some timber baulks.  To finish, a couple of coal sacks have been draped over the open door and on the roof, and the coal merchant and a customer are in conversation just outside.

post-12089-0-91121700-1531941277_thumb.jpg

post-12089-0-44051000-1531941375_thumb.jpg

 

Ian

 

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Great scenes, Ian. I especially like the grounded van, coal sacks and all - nicely observed. It immediately reminded me of a  photo in GWR Goods Services which shows exactly such a scene.

 

Maybe the gates need a touch of weathering?

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Great scenes, Ian. I especially like the grounded van, coal sacks and all - nicely observed. It immediately reminded me of a  photo in GWR Goods Services which shows exactly such a scene.

 

Maybe the gates need a touch of weathering?

 

Thank you Mikkel, the grounded van is indeed inspired by that photo in GWR Goods Services.  

 

As a back story to how a relatively modern piece of rolling stock came to be providing an "office" for John Clarke & Sons, in my imagination it was one of the earliest vans on a wooden underframe (built in the late 1870's), and was badly damaged in a local shunting accident.  Unfortunately, one of the other casualties of that accident was one of J. Clarke's coal wagons.  In recompense, John was allowed to purchase the damaged van and to use the body as an office to replace a rather ram-shackle shed on the site.

 

I quite agree that the gates need a touch of weathering, although I think they look a little less bright in real life!

 

Ian 

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Thank you Mikkel, the grounded van is indeed inspired by that photo in GWR Goods Services.  

 

Ha! That just goes to show how well you captured the scene.

 

 

I quite agree that the gates need a touch of weathering, although I think they look a little less bright in real life!

 

This is a rather annoying aspect of layout photography that I also encounter at times: When the camera doesn't capture subtle weathering. The temptation is to add further weathering, but the risk is that it then looks too heavy in real life! It would be better if a solution could be found in the camera settings or lighting, but I haven't worked it out yet.

 

I like that back story about the grounded van. Somehow I feel that the GWR got the better of Mr Clarke in that deal!  :)

Edited by Mikkel
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Thanks for the plug Ian!:-) The grounded van body really enhances the scene as does the use of pastels to blend the coal into the yard.

 

I really must get on and do some modelling, your efforts are putting me to shame!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

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Thanks for the plug Ian!:-) The grounded van body really enhances the scene as does the use of pastels to blend the coal into the yard.

 

I really must get on and do some modelling, your efforts are putting me to shame!

 

Best wishes

 

Dave

 

Dave,

Thank you, but I really don't think my efforts are in the same league as your own!

 

With the pastels, I just rub the bristles of a small stiff brush back and forth along the pastel then transfer it to the layout, occasionally I'll generate a bit more dust on the chalk by scraping a knife blade over it.  For the area around the coal heaps I used mainly black but also added a bit of brown too to take away a bit of the starkness that black has.  In various other places I've also used white and a yellow ochre to vary the tones.  While re-reading your blog entry on your coal drops I realised that you'd asked whether I fix the pastels on the layout with a coat of varnish or anything - I don't (or haven't done yet) as I was concerned that the application of varnish might alter the effect.  I've found that the pastel doesn't seem to rub off to any great degree, and even if it did it would be the work of a few moments to reinstate.  When I go out to the shed I'll have a look to see what make the pastels I'm using are (they came in an artists set with water colour paints, water colour crayons and the pastels that my wife bought me more years ago than I care to remember).

 

Ian

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I use powder colours in much the same way, dusting then on with a soft artists brush. I mix them together on a plastic lid first to the shade I want. The only thing I've ever used to fix them had been to gently breath on the likes of a wagon, letting the small amount of moisture in my breath do the job. On the layout any dampness in the air will do the same.

 

Jim

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