Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello Mark

 

I have 63443.  It has not had a lot of use but earlier this year it started running slower than my other models and I realised that the motor was very hot - so hot I think it was in danger of damaging the surrounding plastic.

 

.but the motor really becomes hot in both analogue and digital mode. Mechanically, gear and wheels do not appear to block..

 

I am entirely analogue.  Trawling the net and RMweb leads to the conclusion that the motor is duff.  There is quite a bit of historic correspondence about Hornby using a lot of duff five pole motors around the time the model was produced.  In theory it should be possible to change the motor but to date I have not managed to source the requisite motor and worm.

 

Regards

 

Ray

Edited by Silver Sidelines
Link to post
Share on other sites

 Were it not for the 'duff motor' information provided by many owners, I would have suggested an unreliable connection between pick ups and decoder on the loco as the most likely cause, as the symptom of sudden stop and then resumption of movement is typical of momentary power loss to the decoder.

 

There could of course be a poor connection, as well as a duff motor... (I don't truly trust the sprung plunger contacter that Hornby are now using to make the connections to the pick up wiper strips, although so far all have functioned well on my models with these.)

That's a real shame, I've often thought OO gauge locomotive static kits such as this would be useful, not only for those who want a model but not the expense of an RTR model for something that will sit on a shelf or be part of a static display, but also as shed/siding fillers.

 I think you have put your finger right on the reason why a cheaper construction kit duplicating a RTR loco is not attractive to a RTR manufacturer! But with ancient RTR models to be got s/h and such things as the 'Great British Locomotives' production, there's a fair choice of cheaper 'filler fodder' already available I should have thought?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just dropping by.... yes to the problems guardian has! Grr put it this way my first batch locomotive has/had some serious problems.

1 the lubricator would catch and cause issues with running, solution gently bend to the correct shape.

2 as with 34 the letter's comment above one of the sprung plungers didn't work so I "hot wired" around the problem by soldering the wire direct to the pick up strip. Quick in and out move with the soldering iron.

3 duff motor, well I have to agree with this one as mine got so hot I did think it was going to melt the body. Mine has calmed down now and I think the zimo sound decoder has a over load cut off which has saved the loco a few times. If any one knows when the motors become available I probably will change it over to see if the problems stop.

4 I have a gloss plastic spot on the boiler which I think may have been caused by the heat from the motor but it is a distance and not in direct contact with the motor. This one I really have no answer for!

 

Saying all oth the above I purchased a second run loco which has none of these problems! It makes me think I should have returned the first loco at the first problem!

Link to post
Share on other sites

There could of course be a poor connection, as well as a duff motor...

Hm...I trust a poor connection of the plungers may cause a poor running, but probably may not cause the motor becoming that hot.

 

I have the impression that the motor has some interwinding short circuit which makes go - stop - and go again. I have seen this only once (in a Roco class 93.5, motor had to be replaced). May be the whole motor production batch used by Hornby was faulty.

 

I have returned my model to Hatton's now, let's see if the next model performs.

 

Cheers

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Does anyone know what work would be required to backdate one of these into an NER T2? I wouldn’t plan to repaint one into NER green (I thought their freight engines were black anyway), just want to know what would be required beyond renunbering and rebranding. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on which version you own ,

 

without checking

 

Add windjabber on chimney on LNER version

 

All have the wrong boiler, remove lubricator arm on offside , add pistons to cylinder ends

 

Q6 was always Black

 

There are other bits I am sure.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

As Mick says above, pretty much covering all the external details. The boiler is wrong for a pre-1938 loco, though the main differences are the dome, safety valve variations and the boiler bands being out of place (though not by a large amount)

 

I backdated mine into LNER condition, and that is detailed on my workbench, starting here

 

 

I didn't bother with the boiler bands, and it doesn't really show when it's trundling around on its own. Though that does bring into question why I modified the cab to remove the vacuum brake gear!

 

Hope this helps

 

Cheers

 

J

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2020 at 11:57 AM, ovbulleid said:

Does anyone know what work would be required to backdate one of these into an NER T2? I wouldn’t plan to repaint one into NER green (I thought their freight engines were black anyway), just want to know what would be required beyond renunbering and rebranding. 

 

The thing often overlooked is the fact that most of the Q6s were built with Schmidt superheaters. These  were the favoured option of the NER. These did not have the Gresley vacuum valve behind the chimney but had a manually operated valve on the left side of the  smokebox. This arrangement continued well into the 1930s and only changed when the superheaters were replaced by the Robinson style on new boilers. 

 

If you are returning your model to the NER period then some carried pyrometers to record superheater temperatures. these were visible on the left shoulder of the smokebox. A pipe dropped from here to below the handrail the horizontally to the cab.

 

ArthurK

  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.