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All sounds a bit too posh for me,  nowt wrong with the old ways !

 

c5689632bf71df74568ba9f8d7f3e1b6.jpg.c672ea86e029e43c56a2d6365ec6ab4b.jpg 

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2 hours ago, bgman said:

All sounds a bit too posh for me,  nowt wrong with the old ways !

 

c5689632bf71df74568ba9f8d7f3e1b6.jpg.c672ea86e029e43c56a2d6365ec6ab4b.jpg 

As my dear old grandad used to say, he had a bath once a week whether he needed it or not.

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13 hours ago, checkrail said:

Don't think this one's in L T C Rolt's "Red for danger".

Crash_1.jpg.0ab2a8a972e3bb751a3dee8a512ec98f.jpg

 

Seems that vibrations from the bathroom rebuild going on below had made the fire-devil from the down platform water crane fall onto the track.  I was looking the other way, driving an up express out of the fiddle yard when I heard the crash behind me.

 

Fortunately the signalman was able to slam on the up home signal to stop a King from ploughing into the wreckage.

Crash_2.jpg.eb3f43403fddad8b5ee276cd071c565a.jpg

 

No harm done, I'm glad to say.  But still a lot of dust to get rid of.

 

John C.

 

A job for the Laira breakdown crane and crew.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Siberian Snooper said:

 

A job for the Laira breakdown crane and crew.

 

 

Or the big hand from the sky......!

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4 hours ago, Siberian Snooper said:

 

A job for the Laira breakdown crane and crew.

 

 

 

1 hour ago, KNP said:

Or the big hand from the sky......!

You did buy a Bachmann breakdown crane didn't you John?

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On ‎21‎/‎07‎/‎2020 at 10:25, checkrail said:

Hi Geoff

 

Sounds like exactly where I was and how I was feeling back in 2012.  I've still got one or two items I bought then, opened to examine, took fright and stuck back in a drawer, just as you describe.  But many others I eventually got round to making a fist of, as skill and confidence grew.  Re your specific questions:

1.Martin Wynne has already answered the one on 00-SF (or 4-sf as he now prefers to call it, for reasons I entirely understand but haven't quite got used to!)  Martin is the go-to authority on the subject, as its progenitor and champion.    

2. The dense foam underlay covers all the bits of baseboard that have track on them, so you're right, it's not chamfered in line with the cork. (I'd thought the combination of cork and foam, total depth about 5 cm, would give good sound insulation.  It doesn't, or not much, but I then found I rather liked the rumbling of the trains anyway.)

3. The backscene does drop just a little bit below track level behind the embankment (see my last post above, second pic of the pannier) but most of the background in that area is covered with trees.

 

Cheers,

John.

Hi John and Geoff, (and others watching this thread!),

I am greatly encouraged by the above:

John has been busy for 8 years and Geoff is (almost) 78.

I am (almost , in a couple of months) 72. So by the time I am 80, I will have been going as long as John (ignoring my years of poor results up to now) and might have achieved 50% of John's standard, and I have 6 years in hand over Geoff!!

 

The trouble is, with my record of failure on many aspects of construction, while it is fortunate that operation is my main interest, it leaves me dependent on others to get my layout built and they are hampered by the virus situation which affects their workforce and their suppliers.

 

However the above suggests I need to be patient and keep plugging away at the areas where I do have skills:- scenery, buildings, and timetabling.

Trouble is they don't make up for my teachers report which would read :-

Woodwork-0, Tracklaying -0, electrics-0, stock painting-0, enthusiasm 9, but erratic , often reduced to 0 when things go wrong!

 

But I just have to tell myself there is hope yet, my layout builders will beat the virus (eventually!).

 

Sorry for sounding miserable, but I have to be realistic?

 

Take care

Paul  

  

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You're right Neal, it's a problem, and I've often wondered how others control dust on their layouts.  Most scenic items are well glued down so I'm able to get the vacuum cleaner nozzle near to road surfaces, embankments, cuttings etc. But I'm always a bit worried about denuding all the trees of foliage.  And I have recently lost a couple of bicycles and a cable drum to the vac!

 

We recently borrowed a portable air-purifier unit from my stepson (he uses it to keep his IT kit dust-free) and many hours of operation with it in the loft plus frequent vacuuming seem to have had an effect.  But dust is still present.  I'll just have to call it 'weathering'. 

 

The track of course gets frequent treatment with the vac, especially after cleaning, to remove the horrible grey & gritty residue from track cleaning rubbers. Will need to buy a new vac - my little hand-held Halford's one has packed up, and I'm getting a bit fed up of having to haul the main household vacuum cleaner up and down the loft ladders on a regular basis.

 

 

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The rail accident investigators have concluded the recent accident at Stoke Courtenay would have been a lot more serious in terms of passenger injuries had the close coupling between the locomotive tender and first carriage not separated efficiently. The fact that no coaches derailed is a testament to the coupling system known as MTL. ( modified tension lock)

 

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31 minutes ago, checkrail said:

I've often wondered how others control dust on their layouts.  Most scenic items are well glued down so I'm able to get the vacuum cleaner nozzle near to road surfaces, embankments, cuttings etc. But I'm always a bit worried about denuding all the trees of foliage. 

 

Hi John,

 

You can get dust off delicate objects with less damage by blowing it rather than vacuum. Use a bicycle pump/foot pump and long tube to blast it, or aerosol clean air, or one of these:

 

 https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B073F9NY1X/

 

Retrieve any dislodged details, then vacuum the area around it to get the dislodged dust.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

 

 

 

 

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26 minutes ago, martin_wynne said:

You can get dust off delicate objects with less damage by blowing it rather than vacuum. Use a bicycle pump/foot pump and long tube to blast it, or aerosol clean air, or one of these:

 

 https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B073F9NY1X/

Thanks for this Martin. This looks a nifty piece of kit and I think I'll order one.  But before I do, just a query:  how do you know where the dust has gone so you can subsequently vac it up?  Isn't one in danger of just moving the dust around?

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4 minutes ago, checkrail said:

Thanks for this Martin. This looks a nifty piece of kit and I think I'll order one.  But before I do, just a query:  how do you know where the dust has gone so you can subsequently vac it up?  Isn't one in danger of just moving the dust around?

 

Hi John,

 

Set up the vacuum nozzle on the opposite side at the same time, e.g. clamped to a camera tripod. It doesn't need to be too close, just enough to create a gentle air flow across the work area. An assistant to hold it would help.

 

Or do it on a windy day, leaving doors and windows open so that any dust blown into the air is carried away. Or maybe you could take the item out of doors to blast it.

 

Or make a cardboard shield to place behind/over items while blasting them, to contain the dust within a known area. Leave it to settle a bit before removing the shield.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

 

 

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This one's having a long gestation.  It's what I was working on when the builders arrived to do the bathroom, thereby severely curtailing access to the loft.  I did try bringing stuff down and working on it in the study (aka box room) but you know how it is - always seemed that the tool or component I wanted was still upstairs!

E73_parts.JPG.bb4e83d0c6dc70a2c8571d2e1d25d128.JPG

 

P1060348.JPG.a49ddf581f06fcfc9136c6cc47ea7a3a.JPG

 

P1060355.JPG.0e85dd5ec959ba5054ca09bb5208c6c4.JPG

 

Yep, it's another Hornby clerestory conversion.  Might or might not get to finish this before going away on Saturday.  Still trying to get the sides to stick to what's left of the Hornby bodyshell.  Superglue? Huh!

 

John C.

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31 minutes ago, checkrail said:

This one's having a long gestation.  It's what I was working on when the builders arrived to do the bathroom, thereby severely curtailing access to the loft.  I did try bringing stuff down and working on it in the study (aka box room) but you know how it is - always seemed that the tool or component I wanted was still upstairs!

E73_parts.JPG.bb4e83d0c6dc70a2c8571d2e1d25d128.JPG

 

P1060348.JPG.a49ddf581f06fcfc9136c6cc47ea7a3a.JPG

 

P1060355.JPG.0e85dd5ec959ba5054ca09bb5208c6c4.JPG

 

Yep, it's another Hornby clerestory conversion.  Might or might not get to finish this before going away on Saturday.  Still trying to get the sides to stick to what's left of the Hornby bodyshell.  Superglue? Huh!

 

John C.


John

Don’t know if this will help but I have found there are different types of superglue and this is the one I use that sticks brass to plastic so long as you rough up the surface of the brass.

Also the accelerator I use that turns into instant set, normally get off flea bay...

Hope this helps.

 

0D17BB96-0588-48F8-B1A9-41C202402384.jpeg.b35a74082992d7a4326c9e1adf2a19e4.jpeg

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On 01/09/2020 at 10:58, checkrail said:

You're right Neal, it's a problem, and I've often wondered how others control dust on their layouts.  Most scenic items are well glued down so I'm able to get the vacuum cleaner nozzle near to road surfaces, embankments, cuttings etc. But I'm always a bit worried about denuding all the trees of foliage.  And I have recently lost a couple of bicycles and a cable drum to the vac!

 

We recently borrowed a portable air-purifier unit from my stepson (he uses it to keep his IT kit dust-free) and many hours of operation with it in the loft plus frequent vacuuming seem to have had an effect.  But dust is still present.  I'll just have to call it 'weathering'. 

 

The track of course gets frequent treatment with the vac, especially after cleaning, to remove the horrible grey & gritty residue from track cleaning rubbers. Will need to buy a new vac - my little hand-held Halford's one has packed up, and I'm getting a bit fed up of having to haul the main household vacuum cleaner up and down the loft ladders on a regular basis.

 

 


Don’t know I fancy using the main household vacuum John. It might be a little too powerful.

 

I use the trusty handheld vacuum and find that works quite well. Plus the Dapol rail cleaner is forever running round on “vacuum” mode! But it’s surprising how much it picks up at slow speed.

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Good morning John, 

 

I hope you don't mind me reposting the last two photographs as they appeared too dark on my screen so I've run them through my Mac and enhanced them slightly.

 

fullsizeoutput_22d9.jpeg.abca175f3404fcb35c9e521a0a88aa67.jpeg

 

fullsizeoutput_22da.jpeg.d49bca5c206ad7b5ec955c251181185d.jpeg

 

G

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48 minutes ago, bgman said:

I hope you don't mind me reposting the last two photographs as they appeared too dark on my screen

Don't mind at all Grahame. They were a bit dark - must check camera settings. Thanks.

 

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