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Pete Goss

Copper Wort

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It is 4mm and I don't think I used a ruler, maybe for the first line, then just follow the previous course. The only thing I'd do differently is the thickness of the clay. This is full height from the bottom of the sleepers to the top of the rail and it shrank a bit while drying. I would fill in with something, styrene probably, up to the approximate height of the sleepers, then put the clay on top of that. The other thing to be aware of is that if you press the tool in too far the setts start looking more like loaves of bread than setts, another advantage of a thinner layer of clay.

There's quite a bit of discussion of how to model setts, including all the trouble with the Wills ones, starting on page 2 of this tread: https://www.scalefour.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4889&start=25

I've abandoned the layout, but the discussion is still useful.

 

I too have used Das clay but in a two stage process, the first being to roughly fill to the top of the sleepers. The second layer applied once the first has set takes it from sleeper top to full height. Like Gareth I use a refashioned paintbrush to stamp the cobbles into the surface of the Das clay.

 

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More here.

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Hi peter

  http://www.burton-on-trent.org.uk/category/amenities/transport/transport2  Don't know if you have seen this about the trams. Pics of high street included > what it doesn't mention is that there was an abattoir on the high street and you would often see cows heading for slaughter wandering about . As a kid in the 60s must admit watching this was strange. To  be honest not a lot of the buildings have changed in appearance over the years at station street end of the high street. The horninglow end they demolished to create bargates shopping centre ,which turned into a white elephant.              phil

 

Hi Phil,  how very interesting. Funnily enough my uncle has lent me the 'Sixpenny Switchback' book which includes a lot of these pictures. I find pictures like these fascinating as they provide prime source information for modelling subjects, even as far back as Edwardian, in such detail that they are critical in fine tuning the detail that we aspire to.

 

Pete

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I too have used Das clay but in a two stage process, the first being to roughly fill to the top of the sleepers. The second layer applied once the first has set takes it from sleeper top to full height. Like Gareth I use a refashioned paintbrush to stamp the cobbles into the surface of the Das clay.

 

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More here.

Thanks Neil,  I will follow this up in due course.  Looks good.  Nice and neat. 

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Hi Phil,  how very interesting. Funnily enough my uncle has lent me the 'Sixpenny Switchback' book which includes a lot of these pictures. I find pictures like these fascinating as they provide prime source information for modelling subjects, even as far back as Edwardian, in such detail that they are critical in fine tuning the detail that we aspire to.

 

Pete

  Hi Pete

 

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 I agree on these old pictures ,this is the picture of the high street crossing including box and tram lines  Amazing The blue post is still there on high street today . The railings in the foreground are still there too .And the double doors past the pub was the abattoir .

 

.phil

Edited by 77philg
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Very impressed with this project. Refreshing to see something different to the normal BLT (guilty) or TMD plank. Love that you have an industrial Railway set in and around a townscape.

 

Also good to see that you also look at buildings and scenics very early on. I made a small mock-up 'layout of Pencarrow and then made full size cardboard mock-ups of the buildings prior to the track being completed. It really helped and track did move and buildings slightly altered as a result.

 

Will be following with interest.

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The brewery buildings are now up to painting stage.  This building is based on the Ind Coope brewery building that remains today on Station Street in Burton. To the left of the main building are the union and racking rooms.  There will be a bank in front of the building along its whole length served by a siding for wagons to draw up along for loading full casks. Also a track goes inside the building which will be used for picking up spent grains and providing empty casks for re-filling which have come round from the washing area.

 

 

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Once again, extremely impressive modelling, deserved of all the positive comments.

 

Grahame

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Jumping forward to the end of the project I have completed a lot of the figures. I now just need to work backwards to meet myself coming from the other direction hopefully.  The second pictures shows 3 malting chaps, trousers tied at the knee having a chat.  The third picture shows the remaining figures with their sleeves rolled up ready for action.  Engine drivers and High Street population will be later...much later

 

 

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Wagon and couplings

 

The beer barrels will be in wagon loads of principally 5 plank open MR and GN wagons dating form the Edwardian period. MR vans are used for perishable goods and internal open wagons for timber, ash etc.  Coal is being delivered in GW and PO open wagons from South wales. Diagram below shows possible wagon types being assembled.  As bought and converted Cambrian wagons mainly.  Vans are to be scratch built on Cambrian chassis.  Cattle wagons for ale transport scratch built on 10' Parkside chassis with amended brake gear.

 

The trains will be of various lengths, 4, 5, 6 wagons typically, so say 5 as an average; some double length maybe on arrivals and departures. In any case the MR and GN barrel wagons are intended to be fixed rakes so they are simply shunted in and out of the banks as complete lengths as there are so many of them. Other trains of coal and internal uses will be individual wagons.  So I have decided to use 2 different types of couplings. Standard Spratt and Winkle for the uncoupling types at the ends of fixed rakes and on all individual use wagons, using electro magnets already placed under the track, and a staple coupling wire in tube affair on the fixed rakes with a 3 link chain attached hanging at one side.

 

The staples will probably end up being fixed to one wagon permanently other wise they will be lost very quickly. I have used staple couplings successfully on previous layouts particularly to get coaches to couple tightly together. I wanted no buffer locking or derailing on the tight curves and a fixed staple will ensure the buffers don't even touch when being pushed.  I know the white tube is a tad unsightly at the moment I might change them to a fine brass tube.  I havn't used Sand W couplings before so getting to grips with them at the moment. I think they will work out OK.

 

 

 

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Wagon scratch building well under way. 3 plank wagons and covered goods wagons built using plasticard and plastic strip sat on kit built plastic chassis. All have been taken from the Midland Wagons Illustrated History book by  R J Essery. The Directors Saloon has been scratch built using photographs taken at the National Brewery Museum in Burton last year. The occupants are Stadden seated Edwardian figures. The external raised guards seat will be occupied by a suitable converted figure. 

 

cheers.

 

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Wagon scratch building well under way. 3 plank wagons and covered goods wagons built using plasticard and plastic strip sat on kit built plastic chassis. All have been taken from the Midland Wagons Illustrated History book by R J Essery. The Directors Saloon has been scratch built using photographs taken at the National Brewery Museum in Burton last year. The occupants are Stadden seated Edwardian figures. The external raised guards seat will be occupied by a suitable converted figure.

 

cheers.

 

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The directors coach, looks brilliant Pete! Can't wait to see it complete!

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I have been preparing drawings for the buildings on board A, High Street crossing scene.  Mostly based on the classic Edwardian photo of High Street crossing, it includes Worthingtons office building, signal box and a string of shops both at the crossing and taken from elsewhere in the town.  This includes Coopers Tavern which my copper figures will be frequenting once it's built!. Interestingly, the crossing gates overlap when closed over the single line railway track.

 

 

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Road wagons and hand carts.  A selection of kit conversion and scratch built efforts. 4 wheel high and low driver seat drays, 2 wheel floaters (very common horse drawn road barrel carts before the railways came along), 2 and 4 wheel hand carts and a few wheel barrows. I shall need some horses. There are more smaller items to prepare later. 

 

 

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That’s a nice selection- you can’t tell which are kits and which are scratch built- what kits did you use?

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That’s a nice selection- you can’t tell which are kits and which are scratch built- what kits did you use?

 

The dray wagons at the back are Dart metal kits with scratch seats added.  The low float wagons and 2 wheel hand carts use Langley Model wheels with the rest made up in plastic card from scratch.  The 4 wheel hand carts are the Wills market trader plastic kits with handles added and omitting all the upper gubbins.  The little wheel barrows are Dart and Springside kits un-altered. There are more to come using even smaller wheels for use as barrows,  trolleys, and parallel rail trolleys for transferring barrels up and down off platform banks. However next week I am starting the High Street scene so they will now have to wait for now.  

 

cheers 

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The dray wagons at the back are Dart metal kits with scratch seats added. The low float wagons and 2 wheel hand carts use Langley Model wheels with the rest made up in plastic card from scratch. The 4 wheel hand carts are the Wills market trader plastic kits with handles added and omitting all the upper gubbins. The little wheel barrows are Dart and Springside kits un-altered. There are more to come using even smaller wheels for use as barrows, trolleys, and parallel rail trolleys for transferring barrels up and down off platform banks. However next week I am starting the High Street scene so they will now have to wait for now.

 

cheers

Thank you, that’s very useful Edited by sp1

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A disguised use for the OO Gauge Ten Commandments track cleaning wagon.  The ends have been cut off right back to the wheel positions and false sides and upper detail added to create an elongated MR shunters wagon.  I shall use it to transport chaps around the layout.  Note the spring and axle box positions don't match the very long wheel-base of the cleaning wagon wheel centres. It is all an illusion! The wheels are covered by the lower footboard so shouldn't be too obvious.  The original MR wagon was based on a much shorter length vehicle, a 3 plank 9' wheelbase open.  Livery will be black.

 

cheers 

Pete

 

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Worthington's Offices building for Board A ready for painting.  I am just completing the remainder of buildings for board A before painting starts in earnest in a couple of weeks or so as all the building carcasses should / will be completed by then.

 

cheers

 

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Beautiful modelling for a great series of buildings, and impressive army of figures and battery of handcarts to fill it out. Really like how you’ve built up each module with building sketches. I’m old enough to have passed through Burton before they built the bypass, and you had to thread along a grid of streets with a level crossing here and there, on the main road. If you got stopped, you were hoping for one of the Bass saddletanks, they were really smart engines, well turned out. I’m sure you’ve got at least one of those coming along.

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An array of shop fronts for the High Street scene based on contemporary photos from the town centre.

This justs about completes building carcass construction. 

 

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And finally; before painting starts in earnest, a couple of ground frames on banks which control the points and bar signal in the central areas.

 

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Beautifully crisp as always, I’m enjoying seeing each step on the way this time as I spent quite a bit of time discovering all this detail at shows on the finished Rowlands Castle and The Worlds End :)

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