Jump to content

AdeMoore

Wantage Tramway No.5 "Jane" or 'Shannon' from the Sandy & Potton Tramway (1850).

Recommended Posts

The big G clamps are a massive heat sink. Try insulating them with bits of lolly stick. Double sided tape makes for less juggling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The originals were 3' so 12mm with 10 spoke.  There aren't any produced in 4mm which are really accurate so whichever you choose is a compromise. I plumped for the Gibson but Markits do produce a 12mm Andrew Barclay wheel if I have trouble quartering them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the chassis rolling not sure it’s loose enough though, that’s a fair push in the video to roll it that far.

Thoughts you marvellous followers?

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting very close. When it will manage another foot it will probably do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On second view, it is slowing on the curve. Is this just flange friction? If so, you are there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On second view, it is slowing on the curve. Is this just flange friction? If so, you are there.

Hi doilum well there is a bit of movement on the flanges not loads though. I guess it does tighten up a bit on the curve.

Cheers for the input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the chassis rolling not sure it’s loose enough though, that’s a fair push in the video to roll it that far.

Thoughts you marvellous followers?

 

Looking great. I've always loved this little engine. As a fellow beginner (on a general level rather than just scratchbuilding), I say keep up the good work! :)

Edited by RedGemAlchemist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So lead up to the video I posted was filing hornblocks thinner and my Heath Robinson holder to do it!

 

post-32910-0-13833000-1521498581_thumb.jpegpost-32910-0-12084800-1521498607_thumb.jpegpost-32910-0-73134300-1521498629_thumb.jpeg

 

Had enough of the chassis so moved on to connecting rods, I thought the brass to flimsy Laurie recommending mild steel I hunted out what I had to hand, ah a cut nail! That’ll do it.

 

post-32910-0-55270500-1521498660_thumb.jpegpost-32910-0-85948900-1521498843_thumb.jpeg

 

Blimey those crankpins are blumin tiny! One bush successfully drilled in. They don’t want to wind into the threaded hole in the wheels all the way, ideas anyone?

 

post-32910-0-33484500-1521498975_thumb.jpegpost-32910-0-96166600-1521498989_thumb.jpegpost-32910-0-47313300-1521499015_thumb.jpeg

 

Measured the wheel/crankpin centres made it 24.5mm not 24mm so pushed out the hole to suit that, then found on the model that was to much! Time to cut another ho hum!post-32910-0-31426400-1521499098_thumb.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So lead up to the video I posted was filing hornblocks thinner and my Heath Robinson holder to do it!

 

attachicon.gif21246CB3-803E-45CD-B46C-87146AE31D0E.jpegattachicon.gif0F779603-0C10-443A-A09C-F54AAF52E6D4.jpegattachicon.gif37C4AE26-22C7-4939-91A2-FB71015412DA.jpeg

 

Had enough of the chassis so moved on to connecting rods, I thought the brass to flimsy Laurie recommending mild steel I hunted out what I had to hand, ah a cut nail! That’ll do it.

 

attachicon.gif947C622E-D0DD-4A9A-9BAD-2E5EE15F240C.jpegattachicon.gifF255FD05-C65A-4EE6-8A06-F89DA72ABD74.jpeg

 

Blimey those crankpins are blumin tiny! One bush successfully drilled in. They don’t want to wind into the threaded hole in the wheels all the way, ideas anyone?

 

attachicon.gif5949F896-8B29-4294-8D56-158A75235029.jpegattachicon.gif37A7C07B-3D4A-47F3-8504-0910F2AFEFAE.jpegattachicon.gif12FDF011-0F17-42B3-A6AF-9B8C3EC33C65.jpeg

 

Measured the wheel/crankpin centres made it 24.5mm not 24mm so pushed out the hole to suit that, then found on the model that was to much! Time to cut another ho hum!attachicon.gif5950F874-1277-4FB6-9C56-46940D70A50A.jpeg

You need to counterbore the threaded holes for the crankpins slightly as some of the crankpins are not fully threaded.

 

Keep up the good work

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need to counterbore the threaded holes for the crankpins slightly as some of the crankpins are not fully threaded.

 

Keep up the good work

Mark

Cheers Mark for the advice I’ll have a look at that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a lot to report just working on the connecting rods.

So slotted another cut nail

 

post-32910-0-15271200-1522187757_thumb.jpeg

 

Drilled one hole the bubble is a guide to upright with the multi tool being used free hand!

 

 

post-32910-0-90907000-1522187958_thumb.jpeg

 

 

Decided this time to ignore the rule and use the axle as a marker with one hole drilled as the guide.

 

post-32910-0-81846200-1522187580_thumb.jpegpost-32910-0-34277400-1522187669_thumb.jpeg

 

2nd hole and bushes tried.

 

post-32910-0-76882700-1522188311_thumb.jpeg post-32910-0-73050100-1522188364_thumb.jpeg

 

Looking good, thanks to Mark for the tip about drilling out the crankpin holes that worked.

 

 

post-32910-0-53068200-1522190112_thumb.jpeg

 

 

 

Then shaping with the multi tool didn’t get to finish it, started feeling a little under par.

 

post-32910-0-76332800-1522188492_thumb.jpegpost-32910-0-69504300-1522189641_thumb.jpeg

 

Lastly after a bit of advice do the crankpin brass bearings go flange to wheel or flange to outside nut side?

If latter I guess I need a washer between wheel and rod?

 

Edit to add forgotten name.

Edited by AdeMoore
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started on the motion tonight and thought mine was fiddly!

 

I'm trying laminations but they're really small so no idea how they'll turn out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a lot to report just working on the connecting rods.

So slotted another cut nail

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif64137653-D97F-4F78-9808-10943A110F8A.jpeg

Drilled one hole the bubble is a guide to upright with the multi tool being used free hand!

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif0D66D8A6-EEBD-4B82-BBF1-3DCE7A20CB26.jpeg

Decided this time to ignore the rule and use the axle as a marker with one hole drilled as the guide.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif0E99F7F4-C411-4330-AD92-FF3BF3C4F4AB.jpeghttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif08DC7D09-91B2-4F27-8041-5737B739A898.jpeg

2nd hole and bushes tried.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gifC1213D26-9D11-4EC1-B583-72A6A0FCA4E7.jpeg https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif88C999AA-58E4-43F7-A5D7-73AE926F6190.jpeg

Looking good, thanks to Mark for the tip about drilling out the crankpin holes that worked.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif559698B4-AF5A-462C-B104-C9D391CC9EB9.jpeg

Then shaping with the multi tool didn’t get to finish it, started feeling a little under par.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif2EA1F298-8BF5-40F0-88A0-679E781835D1.jpeghttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif84052481-D2B9-4F9B-BA1B-AA33EA1A450E.jpeg

Lastly after a bit of advice do the crankpin brass bearings go flange to wheel or flange to outside nut side?

If latter I guess I need a washer between wheel and rod?

Edit to add forgotten name.

Now you know why I do the couupling rods first!

I was given the advice many years ago by an old modeller who was trying to sort out the mess I had got into.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now you know why I do the couupling rods first!

I was given the advice many years ago by an old modeller who was trying to sort out the mess I had got into.

For the benefit of others contemplating scratch building, start with the coupling rods. Or, make a coupling rod template from scrap brass or nickel silver. Scribe a centre line and drill 1mm hole at each axle centre. File the front of the template to a point. Use the template to mark out the frames and the rods. Keep the template to make the sister loco.

 

Doilum coming back to your earlier comment, I can’t picture this template I.e. file the front of the template to s point?

I feel this method could of saved me some time if I could get my head round it!

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll ask again in hope, “Lastly after a bit of advice do the crankpin brass bearings go flange to wheel or flange to outside nut side?

If latter I guess I need a washer between wheel and rod?”

 

Nothing much again to report,

Still recovering really from the pneumonia and a 2nd chest infection I had, but that was 2 weeks ago and this week I’ve headed back to work just mornings for 2 weeks to ease me into it, after 5 weeks off it’s a little strange but nice to get a routine again.

So this evening finished multi tool cutting the rods out drilled 2nd set of crankpin holes out in the other two wheels, did a basic clean up quartered and fitted wheels and tried the rods without the bushes first, it ran free I’m a happy chap.

 

post-32910-0-85907400-1522961555_thumb.jpeg

 

Sum what bulky so thining down now will be the order of the day with a hand file.

 

post-32910-0-05959000-1522961661_thumb.jpeg

 

Made a start if you can tell, and yes that hole is a little off centre and close to the edge but it’s staying!

That was it for this evening. Check Dave’s Sandy thread referred to earlier in this thread for how it should be done and a mighty fine job he’s making of his version.

 

post-32910-0-99325500-1522961752_thumb.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doilum coming back to your earlier comment, I can’t picture this template I.e. file the front of the template to s point?

I feel this method could of saved me some time if I could get my head round it!

Cheers

Sorry for the poor tablet image.

You should just make out the scribed centre line. The pointed end is the front wheel. It doesn't matter on a four coupled locomotive. This one is a 16" Hunslet. I now have two.

post-25651-0-57692500-1522964774_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the poor tablet image.

You should just make out the scribed centre line. The pointed end is the front wheel. It doesn't matter on a four coupled locomotive. This one is a 16" Hunslet. I now have two.

Doilum thanks for the reply, I get it now I was thinking the point was for scribing the position of the axles on the frames and rods not just indicating the front end. The holes on the centre line are what you use for marking, if I have it right.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doilum thanks for the reply, I get it now I was thinking the point was for scribing the position of the axles on the frames and rods not just indicating the front end. The holes on the centre line are what you use for marking, if I have it right.

Cheers

All the work is done with a pinvice and 1mm drill.

Scribe the line on frames to level the wheel centres.

Place on a scrap of soft timber and drill the first hole.

Push a spare or broken drill through this hole into the timber.

Place template over this drill.

Line up the template holes over your scribed line.

Drill the far hole and pin it with another broken drill.

Drill centre hole.

Repeat the technique to create coupling rods.

 

At the risk of inviting contrary comment, I then place this as yet unshaped frame onto its counterpart, line up carefully and clamp firmly. I drill 1mm holes in the diagonal corners to aid subsequent realignment, and then drill the pilot holes through from the first frame to the other.

Once these have been carefully enlarged to the axle bush size, put one wheel on an axle and use it to scrible the outer rim onto the frame. You can now locate brake hangers and plunger pickup holes.

If you have some of the brass screw type frame spacers you can test this as a rolling chassis before committing time to carefully shaping the frame profile.

I choose to use 1mm drills as this is the smallest size to be robust and easily available from local hardware shops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The easiest way is to solder the frames and coupling rod material together for marking out. And drill through the coupling rods and frames at the same time. then you know all the holes line up and you only drill once. Then you can shape the frames and coupling rods after unsoldering them from the frames.

 

 

Or make the coupling rods first and use them as a jig to drill the main frames , not quite so accurate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The easiest way is to solder the frames and coupling rod material together for marking out. And drill through the coupling rods and frames at the same time. then you know all the holes line up and you only drill once. Then you can shape the frames and coupling rods after unsoldering them from the frames.

 

 

Or make the coupling rods first and use them as a jig to drill the main frames , not quite so accurate.

The easiest way is to solder the frames and coupling rod material together for marking out. And drill through the coupling rods and frames at the same time. then you know all the holes line up and you only drill once. Then you can shape the frames and coupling rods after unsoldering them from the frames.

 

 

Or make the coupling rods first and use them as a jig to drill the main frames , not quite so accurate.

Which is what led me to the template. Once the coupling rod holes have been opened up they have lost that precision.

Many years ago, I invested in John Ahern's classic book and soldered frames together before drilling. I still have the twisted wreckage. It took thirty years to gather the confidence to return to scratch building frames.

Each has to find their own preferred method by absorbing other people's ideas. My scratch building tally stands at five chassis, including two pairs of same class locomotives.

One refinement is to leave the frame blanks over length, drill 1mm location holes in the diagonal corners and then drill a 4mm hole close to each end. The frames can then be fastened down with a small wood screw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there enough clearance thus far behind the cylinder crosshead on this tiny prototype?

 

Worth considering now while you are assembling the coupling rods. I would suggest that the thickness of those rods will give you problems later on, especially once you put the retaining bushes on the forward crank pins.

 

Paul A. 

Edited by 1whitemoor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there enough clearance thus far behind the cylinder crosshead on this tiny prototype?

 

Worth considering now while you are assembling the coupling rods. I would suggest that the thickness of those rods will give you problems later on, especially once you put the retaining bushes on the forward crank pins.

 

Paul A.

 

Not quite prototype, but you can file the end of rod so that the bush is flush. This was the only way to get 82004 to work, and that is in 7mm!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there enough clearance thus far behind the cylinder crosshead on this tiny prototype?

 

Worth considering now while you are assembling the coupling rods. I would suggest that the thickness of those rods will give you problems later on, especially once you put the retaining bushes on the forward crank pins.

 

Paul A.

 

Cheers Paul but you probably missed the captions on the photos “Sum what bulky so thining down now will be the order of the day with a hand file”.

Crosshead clearance I’ll hope so, Dave on his thread seems to have most things covered for me to follow or bodge till it fits!

Daves thread here

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/57208-sandy-gn-lnwr-or-bre/page-27

If you go back a bit you will see a plastikard mock up Dave built checking fit etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...