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How tall do you make the sides? I'm starting my own project with a Class 112 DMU and I'd like to also know will you scratchbuild the ends too or will you use RTR or kit ones?

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Just a quickie Brian

 

When I scratched my Wickham 109 I found it easier to cut the windows when the sides were flat, as I do with all my carriage and coach scratch building. Why do you do it after forming the sides?

 

Will be following with interest.

 

Cheers Scott

Edited by gobbler
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How tall do you make the sides? I'm starting my own project with a Class 112 DMU and I'd like to also know will you scratchbuild the ends too or will you use RTR or kit ones?

Hi DoubledeckInterurban, the height of the sides depends on the prototype you choose, and the amount of tumblehome they have, in 4mm/ft they're all roughly plus or minus an inch. What dimension does your drawing give? As Royal Oak says, I will scratchbuild the ends. BK

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Just a quickie Brian

 

When I scratched my Wickham 109 I found it easier to cut the windows when the sides were flat, as I do with all my carriage and coach scratch building. Why do you do it after forming the sides?

 

Will be following with interest.

 

Cheers Scott

Hi Scott, as you will know, the Gloucester unit has a particularly deep tumblehome, plus some of the side windows are very closely spaced, leaving very thin uprights between, which might be delicate? I don't suppose it matters that much, a case of 'swings and roundabouts'? Sounds like you cut your windows out with a scalpel blade on a cutting mat? I prefer to drill a hole, then cut around with a piercing saw, and finish off with files, so the work is mostly hand-held. 'Each to his/her own?' BK

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Cheers Brian

 

I'll be following very closely.

 

Your explanation and reason makes perfect sense now. Yes, I do use a scalpel to cut my windows. Looks like I could learn a thing or two here on this thread.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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Hi FPH 603, the height of the sides depends on the prototype you choose, and the amount of tumblehome they have, in 4mm/ft they're all roughly plus or minus an inch. What dimension does your drawing give? As Royal Oak says, I will scratchbuild the ends. BK

My drawing gives a height of 2.35mm (excluding gutters) and these being Cravens units they are Mk1 profile.

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These two-car units were built by Gloucester RCW in two batches in 1957. Most went to Scottish Region, although eleven pairs of the first batch went to LMR. There were slightly different front end details between the two builds, at the end of the 60s many ScR sets were transferred to East Anglia, to replace ER 79xxx Derby and Met-Cam units, the Gloucesters being later known as Class 100. Here are the sides with the windows now cut out, although there's still a bit of fine tuning to do. BK

 

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Hi Brian

 

I find it great how many different ways there is in trying to achieve a similar result. I approached the Gloucester units by converting a Hornby class 110. Not my idea but one I was inspried by Jim Smith-Wright. Jim chopped the body about to get the right window arrangement. I cut out the body side along the window line and then using 40 thou plastic card put in new "window dividers". The front was easy to change the windscreen shapes. Once the train set is operational I will finish this and my other conversions off.

 

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Nice effort Clive, but forgive me for saying, your sets of four windows are too far apart (my window pillars still need a bit more thinning down), and there's not enough meat on the Hornby bodyside to create the very curved roll-under tumblehome. The cab shape is wrong too,since BRCW cabs are more sharply angled back in plan, the Class 100 have flatter angles like a later Derby cab. Other distinguishing features are the tricky-shaped front guttering, the boxed-in buffers, and the very deep solebars. JSW also got the height of his Class 114 conversion windows wrong, but that's enough bitching for one day! BK

Edited by Brian Kirby
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Brian, I'll be watching this with interest as I have a set of Worsley Works etches for this - yes I know a soft way to build one!

 

One thing that has put me off starting is the angle of sweep back of the side front windows. Although I have the Cheona and Barrowmore drawings they aren't really big enough to work this out with confidence. Your comment to Clive that this is similar to the later Derby cab, being the 108 and 115 type, could be the answer.

 

I've looked at the pictures on the Railcar site linked to the preserved examples, and this is very helpful in showing the bodyside and tumblehomes from various viewpoints, it appears that the bodysides slope gently outwards from the cantrail to the bottom of the windows then curve inward to go into a deep tumblehome that is then an "S" into the solebar - at least that's what it looks like.

 

John.

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Here are the ends for the Driving Brake, quite a complicated shape, a peaked top, tapered sides, a cut-away bottom, and three-angled front, plus there's also a tricky step-down at the top corners.

 

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Then I decided on a couple of alterations, the rear guard's van windows were reduced in size (not sure when), due to the proximity of the exhaust pipe shrouds. I also increased the depth of the cab windows slightly, although the real ones weren't quite as deep as the side windows.

 

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Now we can go three-dimensional, this is the Driving Trailer, the domes are DC Kits donors from my scrapbox, the step-down jiggle will be built into the domes. BK

 

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Hi Everyone,

I've used two spare DC Kits roofs, cut to fit between the donor domes, with new angled guttering for the cab fronts. Turning to the chassis, i've used two Hornby Class 110 trailer underframes, the motor chassis has the wrong engines. Most fittings are roughly in the correct position for the Gloucester Class 100 driving trailer, for the DMBS some things have to be chopped off and re-positioned. New donor engines were fitted, using reclaimed Lima mouldings, left-over from when I made the hydraulic Class 125s. The deeper solebars with bottom flanges were distinctive features on these units, to reflect this I scraped the existing solebars, and added strips of 10 thou plasticard to represent the lower flange. The unit is currently unpowered, but a Hornby Ringfield will be an easy clip-fit, to which I will add extra pick-ups to both bogies, with Bachmann axles throughout.(It's temporarily sitting on Bachmann 3-hole wagon wheels, whilst I search for my stash of plain wheels!) BK

 

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Very nice.

 

I got this far with my class 109 Wickhams'

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I got as far as getting my bi-directional lights working but as I don't have any powered track this project has sort of ground to a halt. But as I love modelling I've continued with other rolling stock items until I can get some layout space sorted.

 

Haven't figured out how I'm going to glaze the cab.....DOH!!!!

 

Scott

Edited by gobbler
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I have fitted Bachmann couplings to the Hornby DMU bogies, so as to couple the cars closely together, and to other units. The chunky coupling brackets have been cut back, just keeping a one-eighth inch deep ledge, to bolt the new couplings on to. Buffer heads still need to be sourced, exhaust pipes are now fitted to the DMBS, and roof vent (shell type) holes have been drilled ready. BK

 

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Nice corridor connectors....do you make them yourself?

 

When the buffers are on, what radius of track will your 100 be able to go round?

My Wickham has quite an over scale gap, mind you the buffers are cast and not sprung.

 

Your window appatures look smart, how are you glazing them?

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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The gangway connectors are the traditional ready-made paper type, although they wouldn't be too difficult to make yourself. This DMU will be built to run on a 30in. minimum radius, so if necessary, the buffer shanks can be shortened, buffer heads will be solid. Some of the glazing is already installed on one side, as a test. All will be revealed tomorrow. BK

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As promised, here are a few piccies of my test fitting of Replica windows. I took Glossy and my Southend electric to Ally Pally yesterday, to show interested parties, including Godders and Gareth of Replica, to explain why i'd bought so many windows from them! The chaps on the Ingatestone layout, very kindly allowed me to pose my 1500v DC EMU on their layout, as their Britannia passed by on a train. Did anybody spot my preserved 35 year-old orange plastic bag yesterday? Acquired from my old places of work, showing King's Cross one side, Eames of Reading on the other, it normally lives in a cupboard, but gets the occasional run out to exhibitions. BK

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Very interesting, I had a 4mm kit form the late Alistair Rolfe "No Nonsense Kits"  but sold it off before building it, but I have this in my project stash for a 7mm build .... best regards Craig.post-8721-0-52487200-1447247721_thumb.jp

 

 

 

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Little Glossy has gained some front end details, the single top lamp puts the model firmly into the first batch of twenty, the second batch of twenty lacked this feature, having two sidelights instead. What you see is actually the second attempt, for the first go I fitted top lamps like on an earlier Derby Class 116, but they just looked rather under-nourished. The top lamps and shrouds on these Class 100s, were getting on for twice the size. The 2-digit headcode looks straightforward enough, but the dimensions are critical, human eyes are good at spotting things out of true or proportion, i'm fairly happy with the results, but there's still room for a bit of fine-tuning. The roof shell vents are now fitted, using Comet BR/LMS type. It's time for door furniture and roof tank pipes next, can't decide whether to paint this blue or green, a second unit based on the second batch might be the answer? BK

 

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Edited by Brian Kirby
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