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Owen E

Two Baseboard Questions For Our First Layout

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1 hour ago, Jeff Smith said:

I guess it might depend on whether you want a roundy layout to watch the trains go by or a shunting terminus type layout?

 

It isn't just that.  I (and many others) have learned the hard way how difficult and unweidly large lumps of baseboard are.  As soon as it's big you need lots of hands to erect it, and it probably obstructs a room entirely and must be either up or down.  Something in smaller pieces (given the connectivity issues) can be left part up all or some of the time - say round a childs bed or playroom.

 

What you might put on the boards is a whole different issue.  If you just want a shunting layout a 6ft by 1ft folding in the middle might do?  It did for me.

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Maybe design your layout before you think about baseboards...?

Then buy laser-cut baseboard kits because they will save you a lot of hassle, they will be all-ply construction (as recommended by several people above), they will align accurately and will get you up and running quicker.

 

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After all the correspondence here and bearing in mind what the original questioner wants, Harlequin's suggestion seems very sound.

 

Dave

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On 03/02/2020 at 19:47, Owen E said:

To make it portable, the best idea seems to be to split to 2 x 3x4 baseboard sections. 

 

Going back to the original question, 4'x3' is an odd size for ply, you would have to have joins within the boards as well as edges. I'd think about reducing to 4X2 which would be much easier to handle (you would struggle to get your arms around a 4' x 3' board)

 

48 minutes ago, Harlequin said:

Maybe design your layout before you think about baseboards...?

Then buy laser-cut baseboard kits because they will save you a lot of hassle, they will be all-ply construction (as recommended by several people above), they will align accurately and will get you up and running quicker.

 

 

I agree with Dave Hunt, Harlequin's is the best suggestion and would mean you'd have boards that were accurate and ready to go.

 

To give an idea of the work required for boards that can go up and down continually with accuracy I've attached a picture of some boards I'm building for a friend. To get to this point it has taken 8 hours with some more braces and legs to attach. To put a price on them there are  4,  4'x2' boards, 1 has a pair of legs and the other 3 piggy back. All made from Birch ply (6mm & 9mm) with softwood legs, bolts and dowels to join. Materials cost is just under £200. 

273402673_Bern5.JPG.95bed2f5c5936d257f96ad2dba52d470.JPG

Edited by chris p bacon
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We first tried to go down the laser cut route , but we wanted to be able to position the crossbraces to avoid the point work above , ie to ensure under board point motors had space. 

 

So that meant we got the sheets and bracing cut by computer cnc saw, but assembled based on the track plan 

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The layout is designed - see picture below (prominent scenics will be detachable). I'm aware there's a good question about where the dividing point comes - my carpenttry-skilled friend and I will be laying everything out in a couple of weeks to decide final measurements etc before we buy wood.

 

3 x 4x2 *would* work, but puts pointwork at more risk of being at crossovers and involves more points of continuity. That seems suboptimal to me, though I grant the reasoning offered above isn't stupid or anything!

 

 

Little Dunelm 2.jpg

Edited by Owen E

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Owen, having published your plan be prepared for lots of helpful suggestions for refinements.......I would say it needs a loop for shunting and a reverse crossover.

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Ha - as a pre-emptive explanation, I direct people to my layout thread. There is some logic to what's on that plan, and there are "objectives" to fulfil (it's a family play/RPG layout). I would have liked a passing loop for convenience but there's not a great deal of "wiggle room" inside the loop once points are accounted for. The existing crossover as it stands is as advised in that thread - to ensure it's trailing.

 

Suggestions welcome, of course, but it's worth laying out the parameters.

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Another design consideration is wherever possible track should cross baseboard joints at close to 90 degrees.

 

Have you considered four 2x4 or 2x3 boards assembled into a 4x8 or 4x6 layout?  It's easier to work on smaller boards and you can do some running on just two boards.

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4 x 2x3 (or 2x4) would deal with the problem of cutting across curves, as they'd approach at 90 degrees, but would be more problematic for that set of internal sidings, I would have thought. Food for thought.

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just looked at your layout thread - it might be an idea to merge the two threads.

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I don't think that's within my power, but might not be a bad idea. This thread was my "initial technical questions" thread - the other is where I planned to put design/construction updates.

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