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Klondyke siding, origins of the word....?


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Hi,

 

tha term Klondyke siding is often used in relation to railway sidings but from where/why did the term Klondyke originate and what does it relate to/mean?

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Yes, it does seem to refer to installations dating to the time of the Klondyke gold rush.  The nickname was also given to the Great Northern small-boilered Atlantic’s (class C1).

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19 minutes ago, EddieB said:

Yes, it does seem to refer to installations dating to the time of the Klondyke gold rush.  The nickname was also given to the Great Northern small-boilered Atlantic’s (class C1).

Llanelly Steel (later Duport) used to be referred to by locals as the 'Klondyke', as it was possible to make a good wage there. 

A quick look at something like Quail will throw up lots of names dating from when they came into use. Thus there'll lots of references to Crimean and Boer War battles, Royals of various ranks etc.

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Which is railway related; Gresley A3 by way of a racehorse.  Kop, head or top in Cape Dutch and similar to the German Kopf, is often used as a name for a hill, similar to ‘Pen’ in Welsh or Cornish and meaning much the same.  It’s use for the seating in football grounds dates from the time that many of these stands were built, in the same period as the Boer War, which was well reported in the press, so that places like Spion Kop entered the public consciousness.  Klondyke is a similar story. 

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45 minutes ago, LNERGE said:

`Yes the poor chap to be singled out like that.

 

Despite the film and the order to "Kill Will" the Waricks were appalling shots, and so many missed him that another 500 [ish] Zulus got killed in the effort.  The Zulus, totally disgusted at the lack of marksmanship skills of their opposition, quite rightly left the battle, in disgust.

 

Julian

 

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On 14 March 2020 at 18:35, Pandora said:

East Croydon station,  from the  route learning pack, the  map shows the Pertubation Siding, a move off T96 signal,,. why "Pertubation" ? 

Because it was a useful (and intentional) place for getting trains out of the way when the service is up the wall, ie perturbed. 

 

Jim 

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There was a New Zealand siding in Wolverton Yard.

Rugby had the Down Independent Sidings.

 

On a slightly different tack Paddington Station has its lawn.

 

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"Spike Sidings"

"Electric Loop"

"Strawberry Siding(s)"

"Bog Sidings"

"Garden Sidings"

"Canton Brickyard"

"Gaol Lane"

"Between the houses"

Just a handful of names I recall from the Cardiff area.

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"The Volunteer" was a siding on the up side south of Wimbledon. Story is that it was used to load volunteers going off to the Boer War. You can still see the site of it (the siding that is).

 

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There's also Klondyke sidings at Neasden Met depot; "The Alps"  at Neasden, Upminster and Ealing Common are the raised dead-end sidings round the back of the depot usually used for dumping dead stock.

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On 15/03/2020 at 21:07, Oldddudders said:

Stewarts Lane had the Cabbage Patch and the Garden. 

You beat me to it. On Ravensclyffe there is one siding known as the Rhubarb

 

Andi

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There is a "Burma Road" at Shields Junction in Glasgow.  The one that used to get me wondering when I was young was "Doncaser Decoy", was this a yard built to confuse WW2 bombers??  Thanks to the Internet I now know the name was derived from the Duck Decoy that was created there many years before.

However to confuse things there was a WW2 bombing decoy site at Tickhill. It was built as part of the 'A-series' of army decoys to deflect enemy bombing from military installations in Doncaster. The site also operated as part of the 'C-series' of civil decoys to protect Doncaster railway sidings. This was a 'QL' decoy, which displayed simulated marshalling yard lights to reconstruct the sidings at Doncaster during a poor blackout. The site is referenced as being in use between 1941 and 1943. By the 1980s the site had been given over to agricultural use and no features of the decoy survives. Tickhill was also the location of a 'Permanent Starfish' site for Doncaster. A further civil decoy for Doncaster was located at Armthorpe.  So Decoy had a Decoy!!

 

Jim

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8 hours ago, roythebus said:

There's also Klondyke sidings at Neasden Met depot; "The Alps"  at Neasden, Upminster and Ealing Common are the raised dead-end sidings round the back of the depot usually used for dumping dead stock.

And for some obscure reason, the two shunt necks at the London end of Ruislip Depot were known to the shunters as "Mary" and "Victor".

 

Jim

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