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52 minutes ago, petethemole said:

My son is now salivating.

 

Just your son?

 

:D

 

One of these will be on someones birthday/christmas list.

 

John P

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I'm really surprised lego have never done Flying Scotsman or Mallard given that they have made kits of other iconic machines ie mini cooper, vw camper.

 

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The Emerald Night and its compatriots the Maersk Train (modern American diesel) and the Horizon Express (TGV) are perhaps best understood as a half-step between Lego's traditional toy trains and the adult-aimed models of which the Crocodile is the first. Apparently they did not do especially well, and Lego hopes to aim this new line more directly towards adults, whereas previous efforts straddled the line uncomfortably.

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I don't think that it is rivet-counting to ask why they have made it so narrow. Rather spoils the look.

 

I had not previously considered Lego for the garden railway. Would it be robust enough for public use?

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The trains are robust enough for children so should be okay for the general public. I would be concerned about the battery life for this however. 

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On 17/06/2020 at 21:35, Chrisr40 said:

I'm really surprised lego have never done Flying Scotsman or Mallard given that they have made kits of other iconic machines ie mini cooper, vw camper.

 

 

There is a thriving "L Gauge" community with the AFOL (Adult Fans Of Lego).  Most display their extensive layouts at Lego shows.

 

Some samples of the models, sorry about the fuzzy Mallard!

 

jh

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Edited by John Harris
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4 hours ago, John Harris said:

 

There is a thriving "L Gauge" community with the AFOL (Adult Fans Of Lego).  Most display their extensive layouts at Lego shows.

 

Some samples of the models, sorry about the fuzzy Mallard!

 

jh

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20141129_111818.jpg

8d9950972b5e831393cb7d61350a155a.jpg

Which is why it beats me that lego dont see a profit in it.

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On 17/06/2020 at 22:56, eldomtom2 said:

The Emerald Night and its compatriots the Maersk Train (modern American diesel) and the Horizon Express (TGV) are perhaps best understood as a half-step between Lego's traditional toy trains and the adult-aimed models of which the Crocodile is the first. Apparently they did not do especially well, and Lego hopes to aim this new line more directly towards adults, whereas previous efforts straddled the line uncomfortably.

I consider that the problem with the Horizon Express was that it was rather a lot of money for only half a train which came without power functions. This was quite disappointing to a young lad at Christmas.

There is currently available from Kazi in China a similar brick model of the TGV, (which uses stickers instead of Lego's clever sideways sloped bricks for the chevrons on the locomotive), in which a battery box, motor, and headlights are included.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Picked one up this morning while hanging around Manchester, it says it can be motorized.WP_20200701_13_11_20_Pro.jpg.0dd6336eb91a589ae17a1811fcabe255.jpgWP_20200701_13_10_43_Pro.jpg.1df5e9ea51b443c5d1947f40761afff9.jpg

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Posted (edited)
On 22/06/2020 at 05:14, Joseph_Pestell said:

I don't think that it is rivet-counting to ask why they have made it so narrow. Rather spoils the look.

 

I had not previously considered Lego for the garden railway. Would it be robust enough for public use?

With regards to the width, official Lego trains have traditionally been 6 studs wide. Adults building their own designs tend to go wider for better proportions. This model seems to be nearly 7 wide, narrow enough to go with the existing sets.

Not quite sure what you mean by public use, is your garden open?

however you might like this.

 

On the set itself, I was very tempted until I saw the side profile of the chassis. Yes, I could modify it to be better, but if I was going to do that I would just design my own from scratch.

Edited by Talltim
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One little point to those who have pointed out that it is too narrow, this is modeled on the Swiss narrow gauge version ( 1000mm ) and not the standard gauge ones.

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Just to make people aware: by purchasing in an official Lego Store you can get a free replica set of Lego’s first train with a £99 spend until the end of July. The Crocodile is £89.99 but it should be pretty easy to find a small set or two you’ll also enjoy for about £10 to take you over the top. 
 

You’ll also get a dune buggy or picnic set for spending £35, and a 12 in 1 Creator set for spending £85: https://www.lego.com/en-gb/page/lego-offers-promotions?icmp=HP-SHQL-EG-NO-promot-118

 

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Purchased on line at 00.01a.m. today and already dispatched.  There's a Lego Store in town but Martyn didn't want to go in, plus it earned points towards future discounts.

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On 01/07/2020 at 16:58, 25901 said:

One little point to those who have pointed out that it is too narrow, this is modeled on the Swiss narrow gauge version ( 1000mm ) and not the standard gauge ones.

Pretty certain that’s wrong. The RhB ones don’t have the pony trucks. Plus if they were modelling a narrow gauge loco it would have to be wider, not narrower

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On 06/07/2020 at 21:02, Talltim said:

Pretty certain that’s wrong. The RhB ones don’t have the pony trucks. Plus if they were modelling a narrow gauge loco it would have to be wider, not narrower

 

I think the give away is the title of the thread. It is supposed to be a Ce 6/8 which is a standard gauge loco.

The Rahetian locos were class Ge 6/6. All info obtained from Wikipedia.

 

Just as a side note the Swiss wheel notation system indicates Driven axles/ Total axles, which is why the letters are used to distinguish individual classes.

A 6/8 should have six driven axles, although the Lego model appears only to have four.

 

Ian T

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