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Eastwood Town - Into the unknown on two counts......


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28 minutes ago, gordon s said:

I can certainly recommend limiting your exposure to 24 hour a day news to lift your spirits. Whether I'll still feel the same after 3 months is debatable. 

 

 

 

Here, here!

 

Plus, I am enjoying your thread as always Gordon!

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Gordon, given your Sea Eagle post above and the memories it brings back and the scrapping in 64, if you could have saved 1 loco, is there one that stands out had you had the time and money?

 

Also fingers crossed Mr Snooper's comment about a breakdown crane hasn't sense you scurrying back to Templot as I think what you have come up with for the shed looks good, so how just how many loco's would it take of the collection or will there still be things in boxes?

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1 hour ago, Siberian Snooper said:

Glad to see that you have pretty much nailed the mpd. Do you posses a breakdown crane?

 

 


That one passed me by. For some reason I’d missed it, but then along came the Accurascale Deltics and Class 37’s and I thought I’ve spent enough money, so the brakes went on. I guess I’m not a shunter. A lot of my memories came from Wood Green and watching LNER expresses thunder through a station at speed.

 

Even in these very early days, I find myself on a stool just watching trains pass straight through ET and memories come flooding back.
 

Thanks again Roy, for your input. I’m sitting here surfing the web to find pics of all the buildings and other structures needed. I have a few other buildings that I’ll put up shortly. I’m on my iPad and need my Mac to sort out the pics.

 

59 minutes ago, pirouets said:

Gordon, given your Sea Eagle post above and the memories it brings back and the scrapping in 64, if you could have saved 1 loco, is there one that stands out had you had the time and money?

 

Also fingers crossed Mr Snooper's comment about a breakdown crane hasn't sense you scurrying back to Templot as I think what you have come up with for the shed looks good, so how just how many loco's would it take of the collection or will there still be things in boxes?

 

Good grief that’s a tough one. A4’s with 64B on the front, A1’s and 3’s, B1’s and V2’s were workhorses, B17’s with the brass football and striped splashes. N2’s and L1’s, Britannia’s. Over to Euston and Duchesses. Paddington and Kings and Castles.

 

OK. If I had to make a decision, 60004 William Whitelaw as the only A4 I didn’t see.....

 

I sold a lot of loco’s a few years back and probably have less than 50 now, but I am trying hard to be a little more selective.

 

I would hope that most of those will run on ET. Thinking about it, probably 4 running at any one time, another 6 or so around ET and maybe 10 in the shed. The others would be in cassettes awaiting their turn. It’s a long way off yet, but I guess I’ll run some form of random selection process to ensure they all get run at some time or another. I’m sure there will be further reductions as things go on.

Edited by gordon s
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Hi Gordon,

 

The empty space needs something non-railway, otherwise there is no reason for the sharp curve into the shed.

 

How about a canal? I know canals are two-a-penny on layouts, but maybe not at high-level, with an aqueduct across the main lines? Here's one:

 

Grand_Union_Canal_aqueduct_over_railway_

from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Grand_Union_Canal_aqueduct_over_railway_near_Warwick_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1586262.jpg

 

A canal lock alongside the shed area would look in keeping, and explain the curve. And it's not track. smile.gif

 

gordon_canal.png.70624a6cf665b7d5f9ac40d3aec5dc76.png

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

Edited by martin_wynne
sketch plan added
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Great idea, Martin. I’ve often thought about a canal, but couldn’t figure out where to put one. As the shed board is around 100mm higher, it certainly can be recessed into the board and with a footbridge over it will remind of bunking into KX after crossing the Grand Union. An aqueduct would be unusual as well.

 

It’s a large space, so there is room for a mix of buildings and canal side.

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Hello Gordon,

               The  shed at Lancaster Green Ayre is a good example of how compromises were made to fit things in at a later date as things progressed. Access to the shed is only possible via the turntable.

Certainly makes for more interesting movements.https://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/image/epw042035

 

trustytrev.:)

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2 hours ago, martin_wynne said:

Hi Gordon,

 

The empty space needs something non-railway, otherwise there is no reason for the sharp curve into the shed.

 

How about a canal? I know canals are two-a-penny on layouts, but maybe not at high-level, with an aqueduct across the main lines? Here's one:

 

Grand_Union_Canal_aqueduct_over_railway_

from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Grand_Union_Canal_aqueduct_over_railway_near_Warwick_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1586262.jpg

 

A canal lock alongside the shed area would look in keeping, and explain the curve. And it's not track. smile.gif

 

gordon_canal.png.70624a6cf665b7d5f9ac40d3aec5dc76.png

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

 

After all, the reason for the tunnel coming out of KX is to get under the Regents Canal. Just a thought. 

Regards 

Brian 

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Gordon.. this is all your fault!  You mentioned packing away your American locos...

 

I got mine out to clean and maintain them.. got bored with building LMR Coaches so...

 

1100700959_BOyellowcushionedwagon.JPG.ee6bd64c22170499d1b70c4169b03ad8.JPG

It is B & O but here indoors likes it!

 

And for my Proto 2000 C & O loco to pull

 

506283005_COMountvernon.JPG.4108892359496aebd9ba8e3580825e2c.JPG

 

 

Now back to building more coaches for Barnbow East.

 

Baz

 

PS Flat head ( relay adjusting) pliers are ideal for sorting out bent pick ups....

 

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1 hour ago, gordon s said:

Bin men came this morning so it must be Tuesday. I'm getting close to putting a blackboard up in the kitchen and crossing off the number of days....:D

 

Heard a mower on the course this morning, so at least they're cutting the grass ready for post Corona times. Got roped in for a bit of gardening, but otherwise just tinkering around.

 

Spotted several bits of track that need relaying as they appear to be suffering from roller coaster syndrome. Everything runs fine, but it will bug me if I don't do something about it in the next year or two. I really need to weather some stock as everything looks ex works right now. All the wheels are  bright and shiny on the wagons, so if nothing else a coat of dirty black will improve things.

 

Strange morning as I had to remove a driver from the K3/2. It wasn't running that well and eventually tracked it back to a pick up that was only just touching the back of one of the wheels. I just happened to notice it was arcing on the rolling road and bending it back and retaining a decent spring contact, seemed impossible to do without taking off the wheel. I don't know any other way of doing it, so if you have the answer, please share it....

 

Once the nut was loose, it was just possible to swing the wheel out of the way and reset the phosphor bronze pick up strip, before replacing the Markits wheel. At least the square shaft meant it went on square again and was quartered correctly. It now runs well and is trundling around with 20 vans.

 

Other than that, its as back to decoder fitting and HMG keeps telling me to test, test, test.

They must have been listening you, Barry...;)

 

Apologies for posting pics of loco's. I just enjoy seeing them up and running after all these years. This one takes me back a bit. The first one I weathered way back in 2010.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/3422-eastwood-town-wheres-sherlock-when-you-need-him/&do=findComment&comment=169569

 

The weathering powders have certainly lost some of their colours and need refreshing, but overall it still runs well. Of course the as new stock sticks out like a sore thumb, hence my initial comment. So much to do.....That NEM pocket has to go, but maybe a vacuum pipe and three link will hide it somewhat.

 DSCF0647.jpg.cce5b1ed187d2c7a38dbcc867fe73dce.jpg

 

OK Sherlock, over to you. 43047 with a late crest. Can't see the shed plate, so that leaves a bit of leeway.....;)

 

Wellingborough, Heaton Mersey or Workington. Guess it will have to be Wellingborough, so 62-64.

 

Thanks for suggesting a canal or water around the shed area Martin. I'm toying with the idea of taking it out towards the side/top left corner of ET. One of the buildings I picked up from Gilbert way back in 2009 was this stone mill. It's a great example of Alan Downes handiwork, but I was never sure where to put it as it needed water to look the part. Using the top corner of ET may allow me to sit it down somewhat and reduce the visual height. 

 

This hasn't been seen for 10 years, but I never tire of seeing Alan's work. He just had a knack of making attractive buildings. 

 

IMG_6021.jpg.12a7a01d6fd5f4095b08668ffe34fff0.jpg

 

Keep safe......One day we'll all be out and about again.....

 

 

 

Ian's son has been on the site in the past 2 days, brings back fond memories

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/70935-anything-you-can-do-i-can-do-better-robinson-and-downes/page/265/&tab=comments#comment-3899751

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Thanks for your note, John. It wasn’t until late last night did I spot the link to the video featuring Alan showing how he does his stonework. That really was invaluable and was the first time I have seen so much detail in the process. As you say it starts from 4 minutes in and is well worth watching.  Alan makes it look effortless turning a Will’s plastic sheet into wonderful stonework.
 

Hopefully you can still get the wood dye....;)

 

I hope you don’t mind, but I have embedded it into my thread so it doesn’t get missed by others. I’m so glad for Shane to see video footage of his father. He really was one of life’s characters.

 

 

Edited by gordon s
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I don't want to put a damper on it but I would assume the woodstain was spirit based, where as most now are acrylic and the spray can enamel, these are still available

 

On the positive side we mow have an array of weathering paints which were never around when these models were made. Also the Games Workshop has an array of paint types ranging from base colour to translucent. So highly possible to copy the process to some extent using differing mediums and processes

 

What it does show is that stunning paint finishes can be obtained with a broad brush approach 

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I once had the privilege of sitting with Allan in his workshop and watching a demonstration of how he achieved the effects he got. He worked incredibly quickly, and there was no way I could memorise what he did, but thereafter I wasn't so surprised at how fast he turned things out.

 

I'd forgotten all about that stone building Gordon, it is nice to see it again. It was at the end of my canal section, as I recall.

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2 hours ago, gordon s said:

I hadn't realised that and reading various forums, it would appear that not many are pleased with the water based product.

 

Perhaps once Brexit is sorted, we can go back to real paint......:D

 

Either way, I did find this which may do the job...

 

https://www.rustins.ltd/rustins/our-products/wood-preparation/wood-dye-solvent-based-

 

 

I am no great artist or painter, but various types of paint have their own uses

 

I am a great believer in using acrylic primer and satin varnish, but for painting stock enamel rules

 

Painting people then acrylic is the go to choice

 

To paint backscenes the starting place is emulsion paint

 

Now for ply timbers solvent based wood stain, some have had issues with some water based stains and dyes as the chairs will not adhere to waxey finishes   

Edited by hayfield
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One year whilst I was running Railex Aylesbury  Alan Downes agreed to come and demo his skills the stand was crowdedd all day.He was a really nice chap and answered all questions and was agreat addition to the show.

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23 hours ago, hayfield said:

I don't want to put a damper on it but I would assume the woodstain was spirit based, where as most now are acrylic and the spray can enamel, these are still available

The spray can was acrylic;  Alan described his technique on this forum in his thread.  IIRC colron wood dye is still available

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Thanks for that, Brassey. I had a quick look through the buildings thread, but there are 265 pages and it will be difficult to find. I did a secondary Google search and found this. Was this the piece you were referring to?

 

 

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Apologies, I meant to ask, did Alan give any clues how he joined the sheets together or what his build process was?

 

I'm assuming he cut out the shapes of windows etc before painting and then had a complete front/end/side wall which was then laid flat and painted as above?

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  • gordon s changed the title to Eastwood Town - Into the unknown on two counts......

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