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The Hintock Branch-1930's Dorset Joint GWR/SR Workings in OO


john flann
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Thanks Martyn for those suggestions, I shall certainly bear them in mind, plus eg, Corfe Castle. I think I might be spoilt for choice.

 

After posting I had a quick check of my Dorset book, "Railway Stations" that has a photo of every one. I saw there Portesham and Abbotsburty appeared not dis-similar and it will be easy enough to tack the SM's house on one end. In any event it, it will beonly in half relief.

 

Now I do like building buildings so, all being well, I can see some enjoyment there through the forthcoming winter.

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Evening John,

I think Rick's lovely moving words say it all, as an exile from Scotland living on the Eastern edge of Essex, you might ask what Hintock means to me. I had four or more of the best years of my life living in West Cornwall in the seventies and your layout brings to life memories of all the small towns I came to love down there! I made it a hobby to trace and walk old lines like the Redruth and Chacewater, the Helston branch and the Newquay Harbour branch which used to carry tons of Pilchards at the height of that industry. Wonderful memories which are brought to life every time I look at your images. My own most vibrant memories of steam are from the fifties in Ayrshire where I spent several years living in railway property adjoining the old G&SWR shed at Hurlford where my father was based as a driver as I have probably mentioned before. One day I dream of modelling a representation of the shed if fitness and funds ever allow!

I'm really looking forward to following the new project,

Kind regards,

Jock.

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Jock, I quite agree Rick has a way with words and it is all very evocative of times and places past.

 

You clearly retain happy memories. That is all to the good and thank you for sharing them. I have always been interested in the Helston Branch and it has influenced my thinking and implementation of Hintock. And now with Port Bredy your mention of the working of the pilchard traffic has made me think there is opportunity to introduce  similar workings here.

 

That then leads to finding out what fish was prolific off the coast of Dorset, and if there are RTR Bachmann GWR fish vans. For thing leads to another, and that is one of the delighaful spects of this hobby.   

 

My very best wishes,

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like your Penhayle Bay it is a real place to me.

 

I'll do my best to keep the Hintock saga running for as long as I can. I see it as something of a welcome and enjoyable challenge.

 

Good for you John.  We need places like Hintock in our lives.

 

At some point in time I have also made an unconscious decision to perpetuate the Penhayle Bay saga.  It has generated far more interest than I ever imagined it would, has put me in touch with modellers and others world-wide many of whom have become good (if often yet-to-meet) friends and it has, for all its issues, survived remarkably well outdoors in harsh conditions.  I thought I would be lucky to get ten years out of it.  This is its tenth year and if you don't look too closely it's doing fine; at this rate it might make twenty.  The plan to build a new layout for which the track-laid and wired-up baseboards have been stored beneath PB for a while now is firmly on the back burner but will eventually proceed as I also have all the required rolling stock so no little expense has been incurred there.  

 

I'll be back home again next May and no doubt driving through Hintock as I travel from my folks in Sussex, and God-willing my mum's 90th birthday party, via my nephew's Isle of Wight wedding to my spiritual home on the clifftops beyond Penzance gazing at those wide sandy bays and hoping to sight my first chough as our national bird has recently been successfully reintroduced.  From such spots the world which Penhayle Bay has become was born.

 

I'll have to stop for a leisurely pint at The George.

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Yes, Rick Penhayle Bay has borne up well in those circumstances snd says a lot for your original workmanship, the care and maintenance since and the manufacturers abilities to turn out a lasting product. In addition is your ability to have come up up with a subject matter of a lasting nature and appeal to newcomers and your followers. And I'm sure whilst you are in the UK refreshing your memories and discovering things anew once you are back in OZ enhancements to Penhayle Bay will follow.

 

It's all pretty amazing and so much due to the wonders (and hang ups) of modern technology. Where would we be without them.

 

Elements of Hintock go back to the 1970's and still play their part today as well as they did then. The story line too still lends to itself to embellishment what with Hintock Town Quay and now the continuance to Port Bredy. The enhancement of Hintock itself has probably reached its limit, but Hintock TQ is undergoing it and I have now the new build of Port Bredy. Pleny there to keep me engaged. And to maintain this thread

 

.post-3088-0-63411100-1447285975_thumb.jpg

 

Lastly a question, from which of these did that whistle sound that floated through the quietitude of the Brede Valley, come?

 

post-3088-0-85767300-1447286013_thumb.jpg

Edited by john flann
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attachicon.gifDSCN3348-2.jpg

 

Yes, Rick Penhayle Bay has borne up well in those circumstances snd says a lot for your original workmanship, the care and maintenance since and the manufacturers abilities to turn out a lasting product. In addition is your ability to have come up up with a subject matter of a lasting nature and appeal to newcomers and your followers. And I'm sure whilst you are in the UK refreshing your memories and discovering things anew once you are back in OZ enhancements to Penhayle Bay will follow.

 

It's all pretty amazing and so much due to the wonders (and hang ups) of modern technology. Where would we be without them.

 

Elements of Hintock go back to the 1970's and still play their part today as well as they did then. The story line too still lends to itself to embellishment what with Hintock Town Quay and now the continuance to Port Bredy. The enhancement of Hintock itself has probably reached its limit, but Hintock TQ is undergoing it and I have now the new build of Port Bredy. Pleny there to keep me engaged. And to maintain this thread

 

.attachicon.gifDSCN4253-1.jpg

 

Lastly a question, from which of these did that whistle sound that floated through the quietitude of the Brede Valley, come?

 

attachicon.gifDSCN4209-1.jpg

 

And may it continue, John.  I've learnt so much from this one.  Thanks.

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Morning John,

How lovely to see the three letters that signify what became 'my region' (as I was only born in 1947!), albeit the SCr element. I've been concentrating on remembrance today, and doing my usual recital of Wilfred Owen's 'Anthem For Doomed Youth' to the grandchildren ..........lest they forget!

I've decided to start scaling a Bothy at Hurlford from a photo in the excellent John Stretton book on Engine sheds. I'm going to count the bricks and mortar courses to arrive at a fairly accurate drawing and wondered if you had ever tackled this sort of thing? Your brickwork looks very convincing. I'm hoping someone does a realistic embossed/textured brick paper to cover the shell, other wise it would have to be separate thin card 'chads' coloured with water colour!

Looking forward to Port Bredy now,

Kind regards,

Jock.

PS, couldn't spot a whistle on either loco! J.

Edited by Jock67B
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from which of these did that whistle sound that floated through the quietitude of the Brede Valley, come?

 

Surely the Southern one as the Midlander would have had a "hooter".  As always I'm open to correction and the thought crossed my mind that they may have even had the same whistle fitted.

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Polly, kind words and I'm gratified you find my Hintock thread useful. I get pleasure from it and to know others do is a bonus. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to ask, Current happenings and future events should keep me posting for a while longer.

 

Jock, that is good news that you feel up to making a start. Very pleasing.

 

I have counted bricks but no longer. None of my buildings are to scale and I never work from plans. The odd photo suffices. That's because scale to my eye rarely looks "right".  I do it by whether it does look "right" and that's what I go by.

 

t's a subject little written about but the dominant feature is perspective and the distance viewed from. However, I don't intend to get drawn into a discussion on this thread nor forum regarding the subject. I shall leave that to experts and continue to follow my own path.

 

Don't be put off by my ramblings, go and do your own thing. In places on this thread there are examples of "how I dun it".

 

I haven't used building papers in years. All my brickwork is Slater's plasticard. Getting the right colour of brick and that of mortar I find difficult. Hence my preference for stone structures.

 

AndyP, you won't be disappointed by the new build. I shall post soon a corrected track and location (courtesy of AndyM's skills) plan.

 

Now as to the mystery loco, could it be...

 

post-3088-0-44802900-1447374465_thumb.jpg

 

this...

 

.post-3088-0-76542600-1447374491_thumb.jpg

 

this...

 

post-3088-0-99058600-1447374521_thumb.jpg

 

or even this? Somehow I think we shall never know. And gentlemen thank you for your interest and comments.

Edited by john flann
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My 'thanks' button seems to disappear after my first reading a response so I often can't say thanks in that manner, so here are my 'thanks' for the 'likes'.

 

Jock, looking at my response this morning I realized it wasn't very helpful so I have edited out the extraneous stuff. I don't know what experience you have of scratch building so you might find it useful to have a look at my Hintock website,  http://www.hintockbranch,com/ and go to Chapter 7 where i do write about my methods and with photos.

 

Also in the Blog section I have recently (and belatedly) added one about some alterations at Hintock. Shortly there too will be a new Chapter on Hintock TQ.

 

Please always feel free to ask questions and I shall be happy to respond. I would like to know you have made a start, which is a beginning, and to assist in any way I can.

 

My regards,

Edited by john flann
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John,

That is indeed most kind of you. I have a couple of health issues at the moment which (as you'll see from the time of this post) are messing up my sleep pattern, but the medics have plans to help me and I go for a pre-operation check on the thirtieth. I've decided to start cheaply by practising with the Bothy which was situated in Hurlford shed yard, adjacent to the coaling stage, ash pits and turntable. It is quite small and I have a good photo of the gable end with chimney, as well as a distant image of the other gable with the door in so I can get the size roughly right, although I've taken your comment about scaling on board! I can remember that all the windows on the buildings around the shed were similar with fairly small panes so it should be possible to make a fair representation. I shall use card as the brickwork was not in the best of condition as the fifties turned to the sixties, with lots of repair work evident!

Thank you for giving my query so much time,

Kind regards,

Jock.

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Jock, it's no problem to help in any way I can. I do understand your current difficulties and applaud your postive manner in coping with them. I do hope things will improve and wish you well with the procedures.

 

I do have an appreciation of what you are going through for my late wife was afflicted bycancer and undergoing radical surgery on two occasions. She too had a positive attitude, fortunately beat the affliction, survived and went on to live to the ripe old age of 91.

 

As to your bothy, you mentioned the windows. These are what give so much character to buildings and these are the first things I consider and to a certain extent the building itself is built around them. So I don't start until I have them. The other thing is that the window apertures are more easily cut out whilst the card, if that's what you are intending to use, is part of the whole sheet of card, rather than an individual piece.

 

You may, of course, have your own preferred methods, but that is what works for me.

 

And the LM&SR top and tail is especially for you.

 

post-3088-0-08333700-1447515968_thumb.jpg

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Thank you very much for the kind words, and the encouragement John. I now intend drawing the different parts of the building on to the whole sheet of card, and thanks to your tip, I'll cut out the single window and door apertures before then cutting out the elements of the shell. There will obviously be more than one layer to help rigidity, but the outer one is obviously the most important. I'm going to experiment with a new (to me) window glazing method- I retained the clear plastic cover from a Christmas hamper we got last year as it is fairly rigid and very clear. I shall cut it out as one pane, then stick on a self adhesive parcel address label with the panes drawn on it. The idea is to cut out the square pane shapes and remove, leaving the thin strips to represent framing. I'll then weather and fix with semi Matt or Matt varnish - I remember as a lad, you could hardly see out as it was adjacent to the ash pits and the coaling stage! Sorry to drift so far from your thread but it was you and Hintock that inspired me to get started.

Thank you again and kind regards,

Jock.

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Thank you very much for the kind words, and the encouragement John. I now intend drawing the different parts of the building on to the whole sheet of card, and thanks to your tip, I'll cut out the single window and door apertures before then cutting out the elements of the shell. There will obviously be more than one layer to help rigidity, but the outer one is obviously the most important. I'm going to experiment with a new (to me) window glazing method- I retained the clear plastic cover from a Christmas hamper we got last year as it is fairly rigid and very clear. I shall cut it out as one pane, then stick on a self adhesive parcel address label with the panes drawn on it. The idea is to cut out the square pane shapes and remove, leaving the thin strips to represent framing. I'll then weather and fix with semi Matt or Matt varnish - I remember as a lad, you could hardly see out as it was adjacent to the ash pits and the coaling stage! Sorry to drift so far from your thread but it was you and Hintock that inspired me to get started.

Thank you again and kind regards,

Jock.

I like to use old CD/DVD covers as glazing material.

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post-3088-0-43494000-1447800771_thumb.jpg

 

On Thursday RM's Christmas Annual goes on sale.

 

Among the articles featured is one which I have contributed and these two images will serve as an introduction to it.

 

For what is between you'll need to read the article.

 

post-3088-0-85518500-1447800803_thumb.jpg

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John,

You aren't going to very popular with Joanna if she finds out why I felt it necessary to buy yet another Railway Book. It just occurred to me that a copy will make a nice 'stocking filler' so perhaps I'll hint to one of the kids as they wont get in as much trouble as me!

Kind regards,

Jock.

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AndyR and I have been exchanging PM's on the subject of M7's and I said I'd show him how well mine is suited it's role on Hintock. So here is a selection of images showing it in action, and in no particular order:-

 

post-3088-0-09564200-1448078502_thumb.jpg

 

One,

 

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Two,

 

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Three,

 

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Four,

 

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Five,

 

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and Six. It does look the part and performs very well. I'm more than satisfied.

Edited by john flann
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Lovely images, John.

 

Very nice start to my Saturday and a great accompaniment to my cup of tea. Thank you.

 

The M7 is one of Hornbys finest. I am really looking forward to their Radial but I think the Southern modellers amongst us will, unfortunatley, have to wait a bit longer for a Southern liveried example.

 

Rob

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Thanks gentlemen and Rob for your kind comments. Glad it made your day. The M7 is a very graceful loco and better still mine has run perfectly straight out of the box.

 

I too have a fondness for the Radials after seeing them working the Lyme Regis branch (incidentally not far from Hintock) and the restored old lady on the Bluebell. I can probably justify in my mind running one on Port Bredy but, like others will have to wait until the SR liviered one arrives.

 

Maybe even, Port Bredy will be all Southern-it's a thought.

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