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The Hintock Branch-1930's Dorset Joint GWR/SR Workings in OO


john flann
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First snow in mountains previous weekend, more last night, frost this morning, leaves are turning, falling, sun is shining and I'm setting off to drive to Montana very soon.

 

Hi John

 

Its raining on the coast.......we have had the last of the summer wine I fear. Nevertheless I hope you have a good trip to Montana.

 

PS I omitted to congratulate you (and Nicholas) on devising such a simple yet elegant solution to the bridge going into backscene (#1541). I guess its a case of like father like son

 

Best wishes

 

John

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Alan, not long back from my trip. Good to hear from you.

 

I'm not quite sure about your question but if it means what I think it does, this staging is another room apart from Hintock and Port Bredy is entirely separate and will be operated independently.

 

As is Hintock Town Quay-which is against another wall in this same room. (It's a large, what is known here as a family room in my basement.)

 

More later, as I am refreshed and invigorated by my trip-and the door to door drive of 602 miles times two.

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Thank you gentlemen for your "likes" current and earlier and the two Andy's for their kind comments.

 

But I'm too modest(?) too admit to AndyR's observation-though I appreciate it, and acknowledge the sincerity of AndyP's recognition of the current state of affairs.

 

It was what I was aiming for with Port Bredy. That is: straightforward, pleasing to look at, have an individual character and offer scope for operation.

 

Now to implement the next phases.

 

I must say also I'm impressed with my new camera's (Nikon Coolpix S7000) ease of use and results. The only changes I made to the images was, using ImageJ, to reduce them to size for posting here and to sharpen.

Edited by john flann
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Looks great John........you have every right to feel satisfied with the final version.

 

Ps I hope you recover your glasses from the harbour before the tide comes in!

 

Best wishes

 

John

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Thank you gentlemen for your "likes" current and earlier and the two Andy's for their kind comments.

 

But I'm too modest(?) too admit to AndyR's observation-though I appreciate it, and acknowledge the sincerity of AndyP's recognition of the current state of affairs.

 

It was what I was aiming for with Port Bredy. That is: straightforward, pleasing to look at, have an individual character and offer scope for operation.

 

Now to implement the next phases.

 

I must say also I'm impressed with my new camera's (Nikon Coolpix S7000) ease of use and results. The only changes I made to the images was, using ImageJ, to reduce them to size for posting here and to sharpen.

Superb clarity and depth of field John.

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  • 2 weeks later...

It's raining (and just like being back in the UK) there's nothing very interesting going on at Port Bredy except track re-laying, track leveling, track being stuck down, track wired up, track being ballasted, and next, track to be painted.

 

All a bit humdrum and certainly not worthy of photography-so I thought I'd take a trip down Memory Lane at HIntock and here is where I went.

 

attachicon.gifDSCN2931-1.jpg

 

[attachment=768655:DSCN3666-1.jpg

 

attachicon.gifDSCN3948-1.jpg

 

John

 

Has not rained in any great amounts for months here, its all fallen up north and west

 

Love the thread

 

John

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Greetings, I have been following this tread for quite a while now and it's been too long for not to leave a comment. There is not much new for me to say that has not already been said here, it is a real delight to follow a project about one of my favourite foreign railway companies. The atmoshpere on the layout is really lovely and even intimate. Thank you for sharing your work!

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Kind words ATT thank you, and welcome to RM forum and my Hintock thread, I'm glad you made yourself known and I hope your continued enjoyment. Developing Hintock gives me a great deal of pleasure and if I can share some of that it's a mutual pleasure.

 

And, by the way have you found your way yet to my Hintock web site,-below.

 

Thanks also gentlemen for your likes. This installment is more about the important everyday stuff like providing Port Bredy with a staging yard. It's of a limited length of about 36" and that's a discipline in  itself for trains are necessarily short, passenger trains will be generally one coach and van(s) and goods four/five wagons and brake van. All of a keeping with the limited services to PB itself.

 

Sufficient, however, with its five roads for an entertaining sequence of trains.

 

The photographs are, I think, self explanatory. However, any questions, please do ask.

 

post-3088-0-10740400-1478624271_thumb.jpg

 

post-3088-0-71033200-1478624294_thumb.jpg

 

post-3088-0-86138500-1478624315_thumb.jpg

 

post-3088-0-93203700-1478624340_thumb.jpg

 

post-3088-0-13191500-1478624358_thumb.jpg

 

Needless to say that having reached this stage it has led to changes elsewhere and those I shall report on in due course. In the new set up things do look a little different-and I think, to the better.

Edited by john flann
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Thank you John for pointing out the website, I'll read it through as soon as I can.

 

One thing I,ve noticed on your layouts as well as on some other ones that many of the sidings end in a dead end (there must be a correct name for those but my apologies, I don't know it in English) and there is maybe only one run-around loop. Is that prototypical on British rail yards or something that just works more conviniently on a model railway? Here on a station most sidings are loops open from both ends and there are much fewer sidings that end to a buffer.

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ATT; I think you will find the website interesting for it throws light on my modelling philosophy and a greater depth to the Hintock story.

 

As to your inquiry about sidings being open or closed it is a good question and one that I cannot recall being asked before. It too seems more like a subject for a doctoral dissertation and better discussed elsewhere than on  my Hintock thread.

 

But without a great deal of thought and study I would suggest, as is with so many British developments it's a matter of accident, history, engineering, topography and geography.  For not having been done before a way had to be found by trial and error. The railways in Britain followed the canals which were primarily concerned with carriage of goods from A to B.The first railways did similarly. They too were constrained by the topography, mostly hilly, and geography in being relatively close to each other but being separated by natural features.. And locomotion was either horse drawn on tramways or newfangled steam with wagons little better than carts.

 

Level ground was not readily available and where it was invariably in confined localities. Motive power and wagons were primitive and distances short. so In these circumstances stub sidings were the answer..

 

Double ended sidings were introduced as traffic increased and developed as between more distant places with the need for sorting and marshaling to achieve efficient traffic flows..These were built on the outskirts of towns where flat and cheap land could be found.

 

As I said this is a subject unto itself but these random thoughts will I hope give yo an inkling of the depth of your question.

Edited by john flann
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As there is nothing new to show for Port  Bredy-though progress is being made-I thought another trip down Memory Lane would be appropriate. These three show a Prairie in full working mode.

 

post-3088-0-77149000-1479232723_thumb.jpg

 

Running into Hintock in the late afternoon.

 

post-3088-0-53158600-1479232760_thumb.jpg

 

Middle morning and arrival of a local passenger train down from the Junction with its single coach, parcels van and empty milk tanks to be changed for full on the return working.

 

post-3088-0-92938500-1479232793_thumb.jpg

 

Arrival in late afternoon from Weymouth with the NE van added at Hintock Junction conveying the "Grimsby fish." It will have arrive empty (having served other stations on the way) except for that fish destined for Mr Samways-the fishmonger-and then work back attached to the same train for working back to Grimsby.

 

post-3088-0-60778500-1479232843_thumb.jpg

 

A change of scene. One of Hintock's scratchbuilt goods sheds.

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Nice photos John.

Regards Andy R

 

As there is nothing new to show for Port Bredy-though progress is being made-I thought another trip down Memory Lane would be appropriate. These three show a Prairie in full working mode.

 

DSCN3059-1.jpg

 

Running into Hintock in the late afternoon.

 

DSCN3575-1.jpg

 

Middle morning and arrival of a local passenger train down from the Junction with its single coach, parcels van and empty milk tanks to be changed for full on the return working.

 

DSCN3326-1.jpg

 

Arrival in late afternoon from Weymouth with the NE van added at Hintock Junction conveying the "Grimsby fish." It will have arrive empty (having served other stations on the way) except for that fish destined for Mr Samways-the fishmonger-and then work back attached to the same train for working back to Grimsby.

 

028-1.jpg

 

A change of scene. One of Hintock's scratchbuilt goods sheds.

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