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TheLaird

Leeds City, the Midland Side, in 4mm.

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After reading about Wizard models in your topic I went online and went through the site wow why had I not looked here before.My order will be coming soon and I will have a great deal of model making to do which will keep me from going crazy.Thanks for highlighting this excellent company.

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24 minutes ago, TheLaird said:

The class4 tank engines are used mainly for working trains between Leeds and Bradford.

 

A Manningham engine? Back in the good old days Manningham was something of a concentration depot for Johnson 0-4-4Ts, working passenger services not only to Leeds - including the Bristol and London expresses - but also over to Otley and Ilkley etc - possibly as far as Harrogate.

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8 hours ago, Joseph_Pestell said:

Is that laser cut signal cabin available commercially?

 

Its one of my early creations and needs a lot of finishing!

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9 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

A Manningham engine? Back in the good old days Manningham was something of a concentration depot for Johnson 0-4-4Ts, working passenger services not only to Leeds - including the Bristol and London expresses - but also over to Otley and Ilkley etc - possibly as far as Harrogate.

swept away by the  2-6-4T  from Fowler, Stanier and Fairburn.

 

Baz

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10 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

A Manningham engine? Back in the good old days Manningham was something of a concentration depot for Johnson 0-4-4Ts, working passenger services not only to Leeds - including the Bristol and London expresses - but also over to Otley and Ilkley etc - possibly as far as Harrogate.

And even excursions to Morecambe using the 5 coach clerestory suburban sets.

 

Jamie

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26 minutes ago, jamie92208 said:

And even excursions to Morecambe using the 5 coach clerestory suburban sets.

 

Jamie

 

Indeed, how could I have failed to mention those magnificent close-coupled clerestory carriages!

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429395772_W17W48Bracket.jpg.747fc780df8958c6523d027aa3ca47e5.jpg

Another little job completed and two lollipops removed from the end of the platforms. The bracket is scratch built from brass section with some plasticard embellishments. This supports signals W17 and W48, the starters and section signals from platforms 5 and 6. They were originally three aspect colour lights but were at some stage reduced to two, Red and Yellow. They each have a call on subsidiary, a Sykes pattern illuminated and rotating disc that I am not familiar with, perhaps someone will enlighten us? The R/Y aspects are understandable as they match the semaphores on the North side that have fixed distants. Again, it is not obvious why this is so but maybe someone can explain? I have used Berko three aspect heads and filed down the lower part of the hood to form the subsidiary. The LED’s had to be moved around and a new one added to form the Call On. The latter was formed from a clear LED, filing the top flat and then adding the red Banner and “C” motif with draughtsman’s felt pens.

567497752_CallOnLED.jpg.86aa9faa659ca1947ec2fc7e76c72300.jpg

 

The Call On illuminates white when Off but does not rotate!!The signals are operated by a single lever with the correct aspect being shown according to the state of the block. When pulled Off, a Yellow is displayed but if the block is at “Train On Line”, then the subsidiary displays along with the Red aspect. This is possible due to the Permissive Block working between LCW and LCJ, allowing a second movement into the section. Howard and the Prof’ designed a relay circuit to achieve this and it is now installed and working.

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On 26/03/2020 at 19:18, TheLaird said:

 

 

Lovely!!! Excellent video and great progress. Looking forward to future updates.

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Sorry to go a little off topic but Compound2632 mentioned the Clerestory sets and I thought I'd explain briefly. The Leeds suburban services to Bradford, Ilkley and Skipton were unique. This was because the well heeled commuters of Ben Rhydding had the best suburban coaches on the Midland system.  Everyone else in London, Birmngham and Sheffield had to make do with arc roof stock. The Leeds/Bradford commuters had clerstory coaches in 5 car close coupled sets. These were made up of, 2 brake 3rd's, 2 first's and an all third. Each type of coach came from a different builder and each had a different length underframe. I think they were between 41 and 45'. They were of course well upholstered.    There was a small carriage shed at the end of the yard at Leeds Wellington where they were maintained.

 

By the way that signal gantry looks superb.

 

Jamie

 

 

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3 hours ago, jamie92208 said:

Sorry to go a little off topic but Compound2632 mentioned the Clerestory sets and I thought I'd explain briefly. The Leeds suburban services to Bradford, Ilkley and Skipton were unique. This was because the well heeled commuters of Ben Rhydding had the best suburban coaches on the Midland system.  Everyone else in London, Birmngham and Sheffield had to make do with arc roof stock. The Leeds/Bradford commuters had clerstory coaches in 5 car close coupled sets. These were made up of, 2 brake 3rd's, 2 first's and an all third. Each type of coach came from a different builder and each had a different length underframe. I think they were between 41 and 45'. They were of course well upholstered.    There was a small carriage shed at the end of the yard at Leeds Wellington where they were maintained.

 

Just to amplify on that, purely because Midland carriages are a hobby-horse of mine, the good folk of the West Riding were lucky. They had had close-coupled sets of 6-wheelers built in 1882-3, along with the Birmingham, Manchester, and Sheffield areas but were first in the queue for renewal just in 1899, so got carriages in Clayton's square light clerestory style (see the Ratio kits) introduced with the Bristol-Bradford sets of 1896. Because of the volume of work already being undertaken at Derby, they were built by the trade. The sets were close coupled and the carriages designed around the standard (and generous) compartment dimensions of 6'6" for thirds and 7'9" for firsts. The 5-compartment brake thirds were built to the standard 48 ft length (by Lancaster, Gloucester, and Birmingham); the 7-compartment thirds came out at 46 ft 7½ in (built by Lancaster and Metropolitan); and the composites, with 4 firsts and 2 thirds, 45 ft (built by Brown, Marshalls and Lancaster). So that's five builders, with Lancaster alone building examples of more than one type. The sets were originally BT/T/C/C/T/BT but it seems to have been found pretty quickly that this gave too many third class seats. One third was taken out of each of the 25 sets and I believe given standard buffers etc. for use as loose vehicles.

 

Manchester was next up for renewal in 1902, followed by Birmingham in 1908-9. The new carriage & wagon superintendent, David Bain, baulked at the extravagance of the West Riding sets and built arc-roofed carriages with panelling based on the style he had been using on the North Eastern. He also cut the compartment dimensions down to more modest dimensions, determined by fitting eight third class or seven first class compartments into the standard 48 ft length. The Ratio Midland suburban kits represent these carriages.

 

Apologies for that - thoroughly off-topic. But I do have a pang of regret that @TheLaird didn't choose to set his layout 60 years earlier!

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