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Tony Wright

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The mention of street names brings one local to me, to mind. A new development build on a wartime airfield features RAF aircraft related street names – Lancaster, Mosquito, Lysander and so on. One road is called Sterling Way which always makes me laugh. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Anglian
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31 minutes ago, Michael Edge said:

I initially bought the 6 coupled box but quickly found that it wouldn't take short wheelbases (I build quite a lot of these) but the 8 coupled box would. I now have both boxes but only one set of dummy axles and can cope with most wheelbases. I've never used a frame building jig before, thinking they were too complicated and expensive but the Poppy's jig is cheap and very effective.

 

Is it possible to build an 8-coupled loco on a 6 coupled box by first building it as a "6" and then simply moving the chassis "along one" in order to fit the remaining axle?

 

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2 hours ago, Clem said:

I'm approaching completion of the signal box with just guttering, roof slates, name boards and outside step board (not sure what you call it) plus some final bits of painting. A quick question for 4mm building people (I've seen some great work on here). What do you use for guttering that's to scale?

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4239.JPG.36209e9dbe60e2b9e39e921b19b946c6.JPGhttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4240.JPG.89f0f5f8f7fb6fefaa69e162f3d8f61b.JPG

 

That looks very nice.

 

I have used various different things for gutters and down pipes over the years but my current favourite is plastic rod and half round section from Evergreen. 1.5mm for smaller gutters and 2mm for larger ones.

 

When on a building, the lack of a channel inside the gutter is not noticable.

 

Previously I made a groove along the edge of a sheet of plastic sheet with a rat tail file, then rounded the edge off with a file and cut a strip from the edge of the sheet wide enough to mount the gutter the right distance away from the wall.

 

I know some people go to the trouble of putting joints and proper fixings on but I have never bothered.

 

Modelu have just introduced some rainwater products that look very nice but I haven't used them yet. 

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20 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

 

That looks very nice.

 

I have used various different things for gutters and down pipes over the years but my current favourite is plastic rod and half round section from Evergreen. 1.5mm for smaller gutters and 2mm for larger ones.

 

When on a building, the lack of a channel inside the gutter is not noticable.

 

Previously I made a groove along the edge of a sheet of plastic sheet with a rat tail file, then rounded the edge off with a file and cut a strip from the edge of the sheet wide enough to mount the gutter the right distance away from the wall.

 

I know some people go to the trouble of putting joints and proper fixings on but I have never bothered.

 

Modelu have just introduced some rainwater products that look very nice but I haven't used them yet. 

Thanks Tony. Your help is very much appreciated. I've tried hollow half rounds but they looked overscale and so I felt a bit stuck and I've bypassed doing it up until now. I'll try the evergreen half rounds.

 

Cheers,

 

Clem

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I long time ago I read of someone forming gutters from kitchen foil. Cut a long, thin strip, fold over so it's (abbreviation of 'it is') even thinner then fold round a tube of suitable diameter - if you've got the width right then you should have a commendably thin half round.

 

I did try it once. Quite effective but very fiddly and not robust for multiple handling. But if it's (another one) for a permanent layout then worth a try?

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

 

He brought the other two V2 proving models with him. They ran beautifully as well, even with their cylinder drain cocks fixed on, and one had the flanged Cartazzi wheelset in place. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing these pictures of the new Bachmann locos - they do look very good!  Does your comment re. the Cartazzi truck wheels imply that they have a fixed arrangement (with alternative wheelsets) like the Hornby Pacifics, rather than the sliding axle mounting that Bachmann have used previously in the A1, A2, V2 etc.?  There are pros and cons to each arrangement .... 

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2 hours ago, Anglian said:

The mention of street names brings one local to me, to mind. A new development build on a wartime airfield features RAF aircraft related street names – Lancaster, Mosquito, Lysander and so on. One road is called Sterling Way which always makes me laugh. 

 

 

 

 

One of the new estates in Shildon has several errors - we ran a feature on it in the SLS Journal recently. It is not the nameplates that are wrong - the Street Naming & Numbering Officer has failed to check properly before signing off on the names. Pre-retirement (thank God that is over 11 years ago now!!) one of my roles jointly with another officer was making sure such cock-ups didn't happen, BUT with  all the recent cut backs on L Govt expenditure I expect in most authorities there is not even a proper SN&NO role anymore.

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4 hours ago, Clem said:

I'm approaching completion of the signal box with just guttering, roof slates, name boards and outside step board (not sure what you call it) plus some final bits of painting. A quick question for 4mm building people (I've seen some great work on here). What do you use for guttering that's to scale?

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4239.JPG.36209e9dbe60e2b9e39e921b19b946c6.JPGhttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4240.JPG.89f0f5f8f7fb6fefaa69e162f3d8f61b.JPG

 

I have used below good quality and detail.

Wills SS46 Building detail

 

 This kit contains:
• 24 Tall chimney pots
• 24 Short chimney pots
• 2 Large chimney stack cappings (Takes 4 pots)
• 2 Small chimney stack cappings (Takes 2 pots)
• 8 x 80mm lengths of round roof ridges
• 8 x 80mm lengths of angled roof ridges
• 8 x 80mm lengths of chimney stack trim
• 16 x 80mm lengths of guttering
• 8 x 80mm lengths of small down pipes
• 8 x 80mm lengths of large down pipes
• 4 x 80mm lengths of barge board strips
• 2 x 80mm lengths of window sill strips
• 8 down pipe hoppers
• 8 wall tie plates
• 4 soot/drainage manhole covers

 

£7.55 on ebay

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Tony,

 

I just read your LB article in Railway Modeller and loved how you encapsulated so much of what you have opined on in the past on Wright Writes. Great photos too.

 

Thanks again for letting RM use some of your photos of my Fairhaven Road layout for my article in the same issue. It feels like a rather unusual privilege to grace the same issue as LB.

 

I'm so glad the editorial team credited you with the photography, as I requested. 

 

Archie

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7 hours ago, Arun Sharma said:

It's really very simple - "Its" is a Possessive Pronoun therefore by definition it doesn't require an apostrophe. "It's" is an abbreviation for "It is" where the apostrophe represents the missing letter. By combining the two words into one, the apostrophe more accurately replicates how the word is pronounced in normal speech. If you miss out the apostrophe, then it allows you to add emphasis in speech on to one or other of the two words - as you wish.

My generation learnt all of this in school and the use of the apostrophe is second nature. 

 

"Dave's dad's dog's dead" is a nonsense as "dog's dead" isn't an acceptable abbreviation [in the written form of english] for "dog is dead". Just because what you hear sounds like that, doesn't mean that you can write it like that. In the days when dictation and comprehension still formed part of scholastic testing of english in exams, that would be a fail - whatever part of the country you lived in.

 

 

6 hours ago, Clem said:

yes Arun, I've always understood it. My comment was really about why some people might get confused. Rules are easy when you learn them. However, some people find rules hard unless they can see the reasoning, the logic behind it. My comment was about why some people get that one wrong. Their logic behind the mistake.

I learned it at primary school when it was drummed into us by rote without any real explanation - much like the times tables (times' tables?). I learned virtually no English grammar in English classes - that came largely from French and German and especially from English lessons in a German "Gymnasium" when I was an exchange student in 1969.

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

The first decorated sample of the 94XX was also brought. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/94XX.jpg.007c1275116f5d7861df0d1801db7cd7.jpg

 

This has a coreless motor, and ran so quietly we forgot it was still going. It took nearly 40 kit-built wagons with ease.

Looking forward to getting one of those to replace my rather ancient Lima/Bachmann lash-up.

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1 hour ago, LNER4479 said:

I long time ago I read of someone forming gutters from kitchen foil. Cut a long, thin strip, fold over so it's (abbreviation of 'it is') even thinner then fold round a tube of suitable diameter - if you've got the width right then you should have a commendably thin half round.

 

I did try it once. Quite effective but very fiddly and not robust for multiple handling. But if it's (another one) for a permanent layout then worth a try?

Even longer ago I seem to remember reading of folk using umbrella ribs. Probably not a state-of-the-art solution now (or then, come to that).

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1 hour ago, 31A said:

 

Thank you for sharing these pictures of the new Bachmann locos - they do look very good!  Does your comment re. the Cartazzi truck wheels imply that they have a fixed arrangement (with alternative wheelsets) like the Hornby Pacifics, rather than the sliding axle mounting that Bachmann have used previously in the A1, A2, V2 etc.?  There are pros and cons to each arrangement .... 

It's a sort of in between, Steve,

 

It's not as fixed as Hornby's, but there isn't the same amount of sideplay as in the A1 and A2 arrangements. The loco went round 3' curves with ease.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Those did look good, I liked the 2 tanks

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4 hours ago, Clem said:

I'm approaching completion of the signal box with just guttering, roof slates, name boards and outside step board (not sure what you call it) plus some final bits of painting. A quick question for 4mm building people (I've seen some great work on here). What do you use for guttering that's to scale?

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4239.JPG.36209e9dbe60e2b9e39e921b19b946c6.JPGhttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_12/IMG_4240.JPG.89f0f5f8f7fb6fefaa69e162f3d8f61b.JPG

Excellent stuff Clem, really looks the part. 
 

Guttering, well if you change it to an Australian layout, you won’t need it, as we don’t know what rain is....

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33 minutes ago, Manxcat said:

Tony,

 

I just read your LB article in Railway Modeller and loved how you encapsulated so much of what you have opined on in the past on Wright Writes. Great photos too.

 

Thanks again for letting RM use some of your photos of my Fairhaven Road layout for my article in the same issue. It feels like a rather unusual privilege to grace the same issue as LB.

 

I'm so glad the editorial team credited you with the photography, as I requested. 

 

Archie

Thanks Archie,

 

I've yet to receive my copy.

 

As a long-time contributor (articles/photographs/etc) I'm on the complimentary list, and the issues for the likes of myself aren't sent out so quickly as (I assume) the subs. 

 

There's no need to thank me for the use of my pictures of Fairhaven Road. They were taken, as you know, on spec at Glasgow a couple or so years ago, so I'm delighted they've been used. 

 

Good to see you over the weekend, and I'm glad ROBERT THE BRUCE is still going strong despite its plummet to the floor. If the 'deflector had been busted, I've got spares. Some friends dropped a loco of mine on loan some time ago, but I'm afraid it's beyond redemption. The chassis (built like a battleship from one sixteenth brass) was unharmed but the (scratch-built) sheet-metal loco and tender bodies just crumpled.  

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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I am currently on a mission to collect Airfix air conditioned coaches, just had a delivery of 3 more, so getting near end of required.

 

I am being asked if I really need all those coaches the same.

 

YES, they are the open seconds, up to 6 or 7 per set. 15 to 20 should be enough for 3 sets.

 

5 of the new ones though require E or F conversion.

 

The perils of 1980s modelling all those coaches, and I cannot build even one set without modelling, least work are 2D TSOs with laserglaze and etched frames, most work are 2D BFKs 2C BSOs and any 2F.

 

But they are all worked on by me therefore they are mine, unlike a straight out of box.

WR-AC.JPG

 

From top

 

Hornby RMB on Commonwealths and air, flush glazed complete

Lima 2B TSO with frames (currently painted awaiting glazing)

Replica SO ex FO complete

Airfix 2D BFK now complete

Airfix 2E TSO now complete

Airfix 2E TSO now complete

 

No need to spend a lot on brand new models when old ones can scrub up so well.

 

Prize for best Mark 2 body profile I think is the ancient Triang Hornby model, detailed, it looks right. Bit of work on Airfix and they go together fine.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

736277054_Midland1PBR.jpg.e79a55e7b41fe3d93ffe25293bae8b48.jpg

 

736616655_58072_08(BATH).jpg.9587739302f61f7455b4e65cc258cec7.jpg

 

Not too sure about that chimney - it looks somewhat over-excited to me !!

 

... and the dome lacks the rather evident bolted cover plate where the Ramsbottom valves were originally located.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

Edited by cctransuk
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9 minutes ago, cctransuk said:

Not too sure about that chimney - it looks somewhat over-excited to me !!

 

1819471366_RMweb736277054_Midland1PBR.jpg.e79a55e7b41fe3d93ffe25293bae8b48line.jpg.d61b3e6b87d5f20a4d33b292db476360.jpg

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

It's a sort of in between, Steve,

 

It's not as fixed as Hornby's, but there isn't the same amount of sideplay as in the A1 and A2 arrangements. The loco went round 3' curves with ease.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Thanks Tony, I await its arrival with interest.

 

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6 hours ago, Clem said:

Hi Mick,

It's been a while since I did it. It think it was Phoenix Precision can't remember for definite what shade but I pretty sure it was bog standard track colour.

Clem, many thanks for your reply, whatever you used, it certainly looks the part. Yours, Mick.

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2 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

 

I learned it at primary school when it was drummed into us by rote without any real explanation - much like the times tables (times' tables?). I learned virtually no English grammar in English classes - that came largely from French and German and especially from English lessons in a German "Gymnasium" when I was an exchange student in 1969.

I agree - Having studied Russian, Hindi and German where the presence of several cases and formal distinction between transitive and intransitive actions affect how a sentence is structured, there is no doubt that one comes away from that activity with a better understanding of how one's own language works. 

Obviously transitive and intransitive verbs exist in english but few passing by in the street understand these terms even though most normally use these verbs successfully. The French make life slightly easier for foreigners learning their language by creating reflexive verbs which have a broadly similar effect.

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Following on from the recent discussion of signals, operating or otherwise, i thought I'd post a few pictures of some recent additions. My layout is a made-up location so I can't claim any authenticity with regards to the exact arrangements but hopefully there's nothing too ridiculous.

 

These two are the platform and bay starters, both adapted from Dapol signals that had failed for one reason or another. In both cases they were cut down in height, with the severest alteration being to the platform starter.

 

signals1.jpg.56ed4fc5be43777e88ff20e4c7c0ab67.jpg

 

 

This  view along and under the footbridge hopefully shows why the platform starter needed to be lowered. From a driver's viewpoint, the bay starter wouldn't be in line with the platform one.

 

 

signals5.jpg.9a5960bf4ef995e8b5ad63a261795c8f.jpg

 

The signals use my standard servo arrangement:

 

signals2.jpg.48ba4931ac1682445de079fa44a58e49.jpg

 

The mount is made from three bits of thick plastic card, including the signal base. The servo is just lightly glued into position, and the existing operating wire from the Dapol mechanism tucked into a hole in the servo horn.

 

This junction signal (not yet properly bedded down into the scenery) is from the Ratio kit. I made a simple wooden jig to solder up the handrails on the platform.

 

signals3.jpg.634af93830758be68700fc8f0b7ac6cc.jpg

 

But the underlying servo mechanism is exactly the same, except for there being two servos mounted back to back:

 

signals4.jpg.fdf32b30962adac8062abe74c220af23.jpg

 

All of these are driven by a Megapoints servo control board which will operate 12 arms, with simulated bounce, and the board in turn is operated by a DCC Concepts lever frame.

 

Al

 

 

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The Poppys 8 coupled chassis jig - I was given one a while back as a gift by a kind relative,  but I only recently built it up to try. Perhaps it's just me, but I couldn't set up a 8' x 8'6" 6-coupled chassis on it. It did look as though shorter wheelbases would be fine though. No doubt future projects of mine will use it, but for the loco in question, the old Perseverence tapered rods & springs (which have served me well) were used once again. There is a rumour that a Poppys 6-coupled jig might be heading my way in 2 weeks - we will see :)

 

Mark

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