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Tony Wright

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I also have 4 of the Bradford Barton Larkin books but not the Departmental one - they're quite good.

 

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31 minutes ago, Chamby said:

 

Good afternoon Headstock,  

 

My first acquaintance with the GCLE was in my Grannie’s back garden in Wilford, it was at the foot of the embankment on the line’s approach to Trent Bridge.  Seeing the steam locomotives silhouetted against the skyline as they noisily rushed past left a lasting impression.  I also remember Grannies constant irritation at the soot deposited on her washing line.  Happy days.

 

I haven’t decided yet whether to extend the embankment, or undulate the scenery into a shallow cutting to give a little more variety.  Either way, the remaining flat top will go.

 

 

Good Afternoon Chammy. From 1960 to 1966 I lived on Wilford Lane with about half a mile from the GC with a long clear panorama of the line from Trent Bridge all the way South  to the Coronation Hotel, just off Wilford Lane. I spent many an evening after school waiting for the fish trains at the bridge on Wilford Lane - first a K3 on the Hull about 6-50pm and then a Brit on the Grimsby at 7-30pm. Over that period I watched the endless stream of 9Fs, V2s, B1s, L1s, K3s, B16s and eventually Brits, Scots and black 5s etc both from the upstairs windows of our house or by the line side at Wilford Lane or Coronation Avenue. I saw 'Cheltenham' on the 12-15 from the house in 1962 after Annesley borrowed it for a week or so, plus many other memories. Very sad watching the line's decline but those first couple of years of that period were magic!

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oing back to the "shortie" GE section Gresleys; I see the one built by Tony was painted maroon. I was under the impression (having read it somewhere) that none lasted beyond the blood & custard era. Can any confirm or deny this?

 

Stewart

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bucoops said:

 

Different diagram, but the Isinglass drawing for D141 (52'6 corridor 3rd) states that "economies of the latter 30s brought in the 3'9" long step board on both sides". However BR era photos show a full length footboard along the side with the compartment doors, and short ones on the corridor side. I'm struggling to find evidence either way for LNER days as to if or when the short footboards came in. Personally I am modelling 1939 so am into "latter 1930s" but I would expect the war period to bring in the biggest economy which of course started in late 1939...

 

Good afternoon Rich,

 

short footboards on the corridor side and full length on the compartment side, seems normal for the majority of the thirties. This arrangement started with the latter turnbuckle equipped carriages and was continued with the introduction of those with the angle iron underframe. It should be possible to work out when the change over happened, At one time I may have known, but I confess that being well before my own time period, it isn't a priority for myself to hold in memory. I usually deal with this sort of detail on a diagram by diagram basis as I am building the model. I shall have a look at my notes on individual carriage builds, that usually has some info on structural changes to be incorporated.

 

With regard to short step boards on the compartment side, I've seen it, but usually on a very late BR period carriages. If it was an LNER thing, I doubt if it was very widespread. Generally speaking, cost savings were the rule of the day in the decade of the great depression, so it is entirely possible.  The traffic committee reports are full of this sort of thing, for example, the simplification of liveries on goods wagons and their sheeting.

Edited by Headstock
clarify a point
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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, stewartingram said:

oing back to the "shortie" GE section Gresleys; I see the one built by Tony was painted maroon. I was under the impression (having read it somewhere) that none lasted beyond the blood & custard era. Can any confirm or deny this?

 

Stewart

 

I'm not super up on those carriages, isn't this one? 

 

EDIT Apologies, shortcuts don't work on that siTE. You will have follow the link,  go to page five row two, second image in.

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lnercoach

Edited by Headstock
shortcut problem

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10 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

I'm not super up on those carriages, isn't this one? 

 

EDIT Apologies, shortcuts don't work on that sight. You will have follow the link,  go to page five row two, second image in.

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lnercoach

 

Page 5 row 2 number 2 is a catering vehicle for me - I'm guessing the site shows differently depending on screen size.

 

This one may be the one you are referring to?

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lnercoach/hbdfeb37#hbdfeb37

 

Thanks for the info regarding footsteps. My gut feeling was that long compartment side and short corridor side for "my" era would be correct.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Headstock said:

 

Thanks very much for the information Tony,


E70217E was part of the original Stratford batch built in 1928*. It would have originally been built with a continuous footboard, symmetrical battery boxes on the non ducket side, and the missing handrails that you mention in the photograph. It would also have originally carried the distinctive Stratford patten rainstrip, rather than the curved version of some other batches. The LNER did start fitting individual step boards to later batches of well trodden designs. However, the retrofitting of individual steps to carriages / NPC's, that originally had a continuous stepboards, seems to have been a BR phenomenon. I've not seen it on a dia 120 before. When the change was made, I can not say. It's another modelling opportunity, but something to be weary of if you are planning an LNER or earlier BR version from the kit.


The 1933 batch was built at Darlington to dia's 170, 176 and 177*, all on different underframes. One easy way to spot them is by the wooden headstocks. 'Larkin' is probably a book that I should have, I do try to keep my library to a manageable size.

 

Tatlow*

Thanks Andrew,

 

Larkin suggests 1933. 

 

Whatever, when and why changes were made, I just copied the picture - which, give or take, in crimson, suited LB's period perfectly.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Bucoops said:

 

Page 5 row 2 number 2 is a catering vehicle for me - I'm guessing the site shows differently depending on screen size.

 

This one may be the one you are referring to?

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lnercoach/hbdfeb37#hbdfeb37

 

Thanks for the info regarding footsteps. My gut feeling was that long compartment side and short corridor side for "my" era would be correct.

 

 

 

That's the one, thanks,

 

how annoying, you recorded my spelling mistake just as I was editing it! Right, enough of railways, time to mow the lawns.

Edited by Headstock
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2 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

That's the one,

 

how annoying, you recorded my spelling mistake just as I was editing it!

 

 

Sorry!

 

Incidentally, the preceding image shows a full length footstep on the corridor side of a shortie:

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lnercoach/h28affb

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18 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

I'm not super up on those carriages, isn't this one? 

 

EDIT Apologies, shortcuts don't work on that siTE. You will have follow the link,  go to page five row two, second image in.

 

https://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/lnercoach

Definitely.

 

And, definitely in maroon.........

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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On 21/05/2020 at 14:05, Tony Wright said:

The Crownline J17 is 'finished' - for now!

 

Looking through my equally-crumbling Ian Allan abc for 1957, no J17 is underlined. By the time I got into ex-GE territory, there was very little steam left. Thus, this model breaks my usual practice of only building models of locos I actually saw. Still, it'll suit the M&GNR bit of LB - J17s were common at Spalding, but whether they got further westwards in numbers might require a bit of Rule 1! 

 

All in all, a pretty-typical British 0-6-0. 

 

Unfortunately, I don't have a prototype picture of a vacuum-fitted one. 

 

 

I've snipped quite a bit from the above quote - I'm not sure if it's been answered already, the book "East Anglian Branch Line Album" by Dr Ian C. Allen shows J17 65567 at Aldeby - it is vacuum fitted. The book doesn't have page numbers, but it is figure 71.

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And now for something completely different............................

 

1248992775_Craftsman360001.jpg.5e4ab88091ebbb184c37fd2a6642709b.jpg

 

This morning, I started on the Craftsman 36XX GWR 2-4-2T. 

 

An open-framed DS10 and standard Romford gears were provided - a recipe for noise! 

 

I've fiited a DJH AM10 motor/gearbox. From my experience (yes, I know I did the initial testing/assessment) these are the finest drive combinations available right now. Not cheap (nor should they be), but super-smooth. Because they're made-up, they're a doddle to fit. Just two points to note - the grubscrew is very small and adept at escaping, and the gear wheel occasionally needs reaming for a snug (rather than tight) fit. Just phone 01207 500050 and ask for Kelly.

 

I should point out I have no commercial connection with the firm.

 

1295219797_Craftsman360002.jpg.2d8c1ddfabb02a25d9fcadd47f1d7d02.jpg

 

The simplest of pick-ups. Perfect current connection, dead easy to install, no squeak, infinitely adjustable and not (as far as I know) a hazard to health.

 

I know very little about 36XX tanks. Does anyone on here, please? 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Bucoops said:

 

I've snipped quite a bit from the above quote - I'm not sure if it's been answered already, the book "East Anglian Branch Line Album" by Dr Ian C. Allen shows J17 65567 at Aldeby - it is vacuum fitted. The book doesn't have page numbers, but it is figure 71.

Thanks Rich,

 

I have the book you mention.

 

My statement about not having a prototype picture of a vacuum-fitted J17 was ambiguous. I should have qualified it by stating 'in my collection'. I have loads in books. 

 

In fact, a glance at fig. 39 (page. 22) in M&GN in Focus by M. D. Beckett and P. R. Hemnell (Becknell Books, 1980) shows vacuum-fitted 65533 at Spalding (not too far from LB). 

 

I think mine will be that one.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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14 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

And now for something completely different............................

This morning, I started on the Craftsman 36XX GWR 2-4-2T. 

I know very little about 36XX tanks. Does anyone on here, please? 

 

My first recommendation might be to seek out an old copy of "Churchward Locomotives" by Brian Haresnape:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Churchward-Locomotives-Brian-Haresnape/dp/0711006970

 

They were a great series; as a kid I used to disappear into the study for hours with books like these.

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1 hour ago, Northmoor said:

My first recommendation might be to seek out an old copy of "Churchward Locomotives" by Brian Haresnape:

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Churchward-Locomotives-Brian-Haresnape/dp/0711006970

 

They were a great series; as a kid I used to disappear into the study for hours with books like these.

Many thanks,

 

I might well have a copy. But where? 

 

I'm using Volume 2 of Russell's standard works on GWR locos as a primary resource.

 

The loco will be in later guise, with a taper boiler.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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7 hours ago, t-b-g said:

 

It was purchased at a show from a reputable trader with a "You should try this for pick ups" and had no health warning. What does it do and what precautions should I take?

 

Just looked it up on t'internet! I should be OK as long as I just use solid wire and don't heat it enough to make it give off fumes and don't inhale beryllium dust.

 

Or maybe I go back to using other wire!

 

 

In a (now) former life (I retired at the end of April) I worked on a system that contained electrical contacts made from Beryllium Copper.  Whilst I never had cause to actually work with the material itself, the Boss was always twitchy about it (and this was on a system where other components would really hurt you given the chance. 

My understanding that any dust, mist or fume can cause a serious Lung condition, Chronic Beryllium Disease.  It's also classified as a Class 1 carcinogen.  I've no idea what exposure rate is needed to cause problems though.

I'd suggest (if it shows real advantages over other materials and you fancy using it) then be wary of any process which involves dust, filings etc.  And don't go sniffing the fumes when soldering....:jester:  

 

5 hours ago, Buhar said:

I think it was Ian Rice who suggested soldering a smidgen of gold on the business end of pick ups. 

Alan 

 

Wouldn't gold wear rapidly, being soft?

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10 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

I built one for a friend a couple of years ago, but I can't find the pictures for some reason. Archie, if you're reading this, would you mind posting your pictures of it, please? 

 

 

 

 

No problem at all Tony. Here are a couple. She still runs ever so sweetly. 

 

Archie

 

IMG_1350.JPG

IMG_1355.JPG

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13 hours ago, jwealleans said:

 

Blimey yes, mine is certainly ahead of that both in quality of print and design - there's a clear rebate behind each window (but not droplights or ends) to glaze into.   I have been taking pictures but I don't seem to have included the inside of the sides.  I'll try to do something today.

 

I superglued mine but all four corners needed some filling.  I've also used the central lavs to allow bracing pieces across the body which has helped it stay square and rigid.

 

spacer.png

 

Good evening Jonathan,

 

you didn't reply to my question, but don't nock yourself out, I'm kind of losing any interest in the Isinglass kits.

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Good evening Tony and all, I was talking to Simon A.C.Martin (who sends his regards), he asked if I could post up some photos of his latest LNER model, 4489 'Dominion of Canada'. I think it's rather nice and brought back memories of The Great Goodbye a few years ago. 

 

100514841_548645875800038_3015005507795550208_n.jpg.38de126675db0f1d66aa4ad3041c7dcd.jpg

 

Here's the spec list.

GBL bodyshell for loco and tender
Hornby tender chassis and wheels
Bachmann latest A4 chassis
Graeme king single chimney resin casting
Maygibb A4 buffers
Bell from spares box
Own garter blue paint
Humbrol no.20 for wheels
Fox transfers for nameplates and etched parts and crests
Hand painted parabolic curve
And Johnson’s Klear to seal
 

 

99415926_545241879685480_7136723362197274624_n.jpg

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101389101_183920119535948_4567698470915276800_n.jpg

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2 hours ago, Manxcat said:

No problem at all Tony. Here are a couple. She still runs ever so sweetly. 

 

Archie

 

IMG_1350.JPG

IMG_1355.JPG

Many thanks Archie,

 

You made a very good job of painting/weathering it.

 

It might run even better were it on the track! Sorry, couldn't resist....

 

The correct-style bogie wheels DO make a difference.

 

And, I assume, there are no squeaks?

 

Best regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, 92220 said:


Dear Tony,
 

You are far too kind.  I think, if my 46245 was the subject of one of your excellent photos, you might see a much bigger difference between my work and Geoff’s.
 

The surprise might be how I actually got to this point, which might confound the purists.  I think it is ready for weathering, but sometimes the camera shows up something I’ve forgotten:
 

D16BBE91-8D99-4908-9BCE-1C9E44E49214.jpeg.a0e2d20d5fac7180fbc5bed1138077fa.jpeg

 

First step from here was aerosol red primer and then the entire body was sprayed with more Halfords paint:

 

B6AAFA9C-7E68-4D29-96FE-6289767DB770.jpeg.ee1cf9d2fbfac1fcac1508af207f64b6.jpeg

 

8A76D8D0-60DC-4D7D-B3F4-75946EDC71AE.jpeg.4b4b343215f15baf675231ae043262f8.jpeg

 

In the background you can see the developing progress on a Comet Scot too.  
 

Then brush painted satin black and transfers.

 

FE2F0594-BA20-4A08-97BF-EB79A7CE4459.jpeg.d2ac945371c00dfba8e5e6840ef6624f.jpeg

 

EAD94B8A-4AF6-4A4B-A8CC-E436259BC48E.jpeg.325646460326bf0bcc4f93d52edd004b.jpeg

 

Fox transfer set includes yellow lines that are a trifle wide if I’m honest, but it was the best option at the time.  They will tone down with weathering, and I used BR Maroon yellow and black carriage lining for the buffer beams which was much finer.  Finally, I used a very fine sable to touch in all the black lines at the panel edges.

 

Almost there on 46145 too.  
 

814F5273-5721-4198-972D-24F27EA5327E.jpeg.d099be32bd6326159c5183ba4c0bfb3b.jpeg
 

D335EAA6-0255-471E-B9F6-6C2A7DF7DE24.jpeg.b4ba092ee0646631356b99972e17be19.jpeg

 

You kindly hosted this one at LB a couple of years ago but with the move etc, it hasn’t been completed until now.  
 

I used a custom can of deep bronze green made up in the shop, which seems ok.

 

46145 was not a regular at Camden but I have a photo of it there in 1959 and it has great significance for me.
 

As you know, my loco building owes much to you: thank you very much indeed.
 

Many thanks too for your offer of help with the control panel, which I will gratefully accept.

 

Best wishes as always,

 

Iain

 

 

 

My pleasure, Iain,

 

Thanks for showing us your progress. It's very impressive.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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7 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Many thanks Archie,

 

You made a very good job of painting/weathering it.

 

It might run even better were it on the track! Sorry, couldn't resist....

 

The correct-style bogie wheels DO make a difference.

 

And, I assume, there are no squeaks?

 

Best regards,

 

Tony. 

 

9 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Many thanks Archie,

 

You made a very good job of painting/weathering it.

 

It might run even better were it on the track! Sorry, couldn't resist....

 

The correct-style bogie wheels DO make a difference.

 

And, I assume, there are no squeaks?

 

Best regards,

 

Tony. 

 

A7 69772 12 August 1956.jpg

A7 69772 Dairycoates 1955.jpg

A7 69772, Dairycoates.jpg

A7 69772_A7_p.jpg

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