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14 hours ago, Barry O said:

DNE Smith will be turning in his grave!  It was about to be "got rid of" at Didcot.. then Dave used a fire axe to show it had windows at each end.. by putting the axe through the plated over windows. The underframe had a plate over the lozenge shaped  cut out in the floor...  New boiler from teh Leeds and Bradford Boiler Company - none of this German stainless steel carp.. it used the original drawings and is a thing of great beauty!

 

Baz

 

12 hours ago, drmditch said:

'Sentinel thingies' 

So, high pressure watertube boilers, (well some of them), poppet valves - what's to dislike?

Good articles in RCTS and ..... here....

It might be that diesel engines were improving throughout the interwar years, but in the late 20s and early 30s the Sentinels provided a service with advanced steam technology.

 

Anyway, I like my Dia89 car.

 

 

908441472_Post_03-Copy.JPG.481b71667584bb8933fd52c78298456b.JPG

 

And I still have aspirations to build 'Phenomena' as well.

 

Of course! Perhaps my tongue was so far in my cheek that it was invisible. I was merely responding to my good friend @Woodcock29 Andrew's, equally tongue-in-cheek, gentle leg-pulling.

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2 hours ago, great central said:

When I passed the one at Lowdham yesterday, Midland admittedly, it was just a skeleton. All windows removed so expect that's in it's last days as well.

Yes. I fear that Network Rail, who have wanted to demolish these boxes for some time, have used the COVID situation to get them demolished when local opposition - not insignificant, certainly in the case of Bingham - are well and truly distracted. Anyway, I have to go to my sister's house at Bingham this morning and I'll see if my worst fears have been justified.

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7 hours ago, Chuffer Davies said:

A few days/weeks ago we were discussing our Covid-19 activity.  Today I have completed a project that has been progressed entirely within Lockdown, from initial research and design, through two test builds, to a fully assembled model.  The J1 is the 4th loco developed specifically for Shipley MRS's Clayton project and for which no kit is currently available.   The initial test build, whilst highly informative, was ultimately frustrating because it did not deliver a completed model.  I did end up with a usable chassis but the build of the superstructure hit problems early on when I realised that the beading on the centre splashers was missing.  It was down hill from there on in with a couple of other significant errors found, but it was still necessary to continue with the build to determine what other design errors I'd made.    

 

Armed with a list of errors it was back to the computer to correct the CAD artwork and then a 2nd request to PPD Ltd to run off a new set of etches.  Whilst I awaited these new etches I used the time to build the tender in readiness for a second attempt. 

 

Whilst the version 2 etches are not without error, none of these were insurmountable and I now have a model that I feel captures the look of the prototype and that I am happy to send off for painting.  I still have a new list of corrections to make to the CAD files and then it will be back to PPD for what I hope will be the third and last set of test etches.

 

In the mean time I plan to start on the research and design of my 5th and probably last new locomotive kit for Clayton, the J2.  Lets hope that before I have a completed J2 model in my hands the Covid crisis will be over and we can start visiting each other and attending our clubs and exhibitions once more.

 

IMG_2567.jpg.98dfc3e9f829d1a1a28af91b6eec3827.jpg

 

Regards,

 

Frank

 

     

That's looking superb Frank. What an absolutely brilliant piece of work from the design stage right through to the build. I'm very tempted to try my hand at CAD and the subsequent etch process but I do feel a little daunted by it. However I have at least two little projects in mind which may prompt me to take the plunge. I look forward to seeing the completed J2 - the last of GN 0-6-0s to be produced in kit form and to complete the full set!

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7 hours ago, Chuffer Davies said:

A few days/weeks ago we were discussing our Covid-19 activity.  Today I have completed a project that has been progressed entirely within Lockdown, from initial research and design, through two test builds, to a fully assembled model.  The J1 is the 4th loco developed specifically for Shipley MRS's Clayton project and for which no kit is currently available.   The initial test build, whilst highly informative, was ultimately frustrating because it did not deliver a completed model.  I did end up with a usable chassis but the build of the superstructure hit problems early on when I realised that the beading on the centre splashers was missing.  It was down hill from there on in with a couple of other significant errors found, but it was still necessary to continue with the build to determine what other design errors I'd made.    

 

Armed with a list of errors it was back to the computer to correct the CAD artwork and then a 2nd request to PPD Ltd to run off a new set of etches.  Whilst I awaited these new etches I used the time to build the tender in readiness for a second attempt. 

 

Whilst the version 2 etches are not without error, none of these were insurmountable and I now have a model that I feel captures the look of the prototype and that I am happy to send off for painting.  I still have a new list of corrections to make to the CAD files and then it will be back to PPD for what I hope will be the third and last set of test etches.

 

In the mean time I plan to start on the research and design of my 5th and probably last new locomotive kit for Clayton, the J2.  Lets hope that before I have a completed J2 model in my hands the Covid crisis will be over and we can start visiting each other and attending our clubs and exhibitions once more.

 

IMG_2567.jpg.98dfc3e9f829d1a1a28af91b6eec3827.jpg

 

Regards,

 

Frank

 

     

That looks beautiful work, Frank.

 

One thing which intrigues is the non-painting of the frames.

 

After I'm happy that I've built a set of (rigid) frames correctly, the first thing I do is paint their outsides - behind the drivers. That way, once I'm then happy that the drive is sweet, the drivers are in place and the rods are on to produce a sweet-running prime mover, nothing then has to be taken off to paint. 

 

I assume the drivers have now to be taken off/dropped out to paint the frames? By the painter? Do you then reassemble the chassis? 

 

I ask these questions because I now never let anyone else dismantle/reassemble any mechanisms I've built. As is known, I use top painters (four so far) and in every case (without being too critical), where the wheels have to be taken off to, say, paint/line them, when back together, the mechanisms are never as sweet as on delivery. Thus, if wheels need painting, they go to the painter first. I then build the whole mechanism. In fact, in most cases, only the bodywork goes to the painter. 

 

Someone once suggested (was it Iain Rice?) that a whole chassis (wheels on) could be painted by dangling it from a hook, with wires attached to the motor so that it was running, and then spraying it as the whole lot whirled round (I assume the motor itself was masked). I can't think of any dafter process! 

 

Might I suggest before it's painted, you straighten out the rear axlebox on the tender? That said, once painted, who'll notice?

 

Again, wonderful work.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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17 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I don't mind anyone asking questions, William.

 

It is a 'kit', but I'd better qualify that. As the one-time proprietor of Prototype Models, Ian Wilson has a long pedigree in designing cardboard kits for buildings. Originally, they'd be produced on the drawing board, but now he just designs them on his computer. He then prints them out on paper (using non-fugitive inks), makes a card skeleton and sticks the prints on. 

 

I'll ask him if he'll make you a kit for the little 'box.

 

I count myself immensely fortunate (in a slightly perverse way) that despite Ian's incredible skill at producing buildings, he's something of a dud at making locos. He fights shy of soldering, glues them together (which means they subsequently fall apart) and they never run properly; excellent! Because, in exchange for my building of locos for him (and metal rolling stock) I have many buildings, bridges and structures which grace Little Bytham. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

17 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I don't mind anyone asking questions, William.

 

It is a 'kit', but I'd better qualify that. As the one-time proprietor of Prototype Models, Ian Wilson has a long pedigree in designing cardboard kits for buildings. Originally, they'd be produced on the drawing board, but now he just designs them on his computer. He then prints them out on paper (using non-fugitive inks), makes a card skeleton and sticks the prints on. 

 

I'll ask him if he'll make you a kit for the little 'box.

 

I count myself immensely fortunate (in a slightly perverse way) that despite Ian's incredible skill at producing buildings, he's something of a dud at making locos. He fights shy of soldering, glues them together (which means they subsequently fall apart) and they never run properly; excellent! Because, in exchange for my building of locos for him (and metal rolling stock) I have many buildings, bridges and structures which grace Little Bytham. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Tony,

 

That's very kind. I will send you a PM.

 

Thanks,

 

William

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9 hours ago, Chuffer Davies said:

A few days/weeks ago we were discussing our Covid-19 activity.  Today I have completed a project that has been progressed entirely within Lockdown, from initial research and design, through two test builds, to a fully assembled model.  The J1 is the 4th loco developed specifically for Shipley MRS's Clayton project and for which no kit is currently available.   The initial test build, whilst highly informative, was ultimately frustrating because it did not deliver a completed model.  I did end up with a usable chassis but the build of the superstructure hit problems early on when I realised that the beading on the centre splashers was missing.  It was down hill from there on in with a couple of other significant errors found, but it was still necessary to continue with the build to determine what other design errors I'd made.    

 

Armed with a list of errors it was back to the computer to correct the CAD artwork and then a 2nd request to PPD Ltd to run off a new set of etches.  Whilst I awaited these new etches I used the time to build the tender in readiness for a second attempt. 

 

Whilst the version 2 etches are not without error, none of these were insurmountable and I now have a model that I feel captures the look of the prototype and that I am happy to send off for painting.  I still have a new list of corrections to make to the CAD files and then it will be back to PPD for what I hope will be the third and last set of test etches.

 

In the mean time I plan to start on the research and design of my 5th and probably last new locomotive kit for Clayton, the J2.  Lets hope that before I have a completed J2 model in my hands the Covid crisis will be over and we can start visiting each other and attending our clubs and exhibitions once more.

 

IMG_2567.jpg.98dfc3e9f829d1a1a28af91b6eec3827.jpg

 

Regards,

 

Frank

 

     

The J1 looks wonderful Frank. I think you said previously its likely to be offered to John for the LRM range. I certainly hope so! I was going to build a J1 out of a Graeme King resin J6 kit but if I can get one of these I'll make Graeme's J6 into what its meant to be - a J6!

 

Regards

 

Andrew

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I have show this before but it seems appropriate! One if my late father's photos, taken at Annesley in 1948.

 

1448251111_J1Annesley1948.jpg.c0c8c0ebd81a9030b562e4d8b1ffec5c.jpg

 

Those GNR 0-6-0s are lovely and when we are all used to Black 5s, B1s and BR Standard types it is odd to think that back in "the day" the J1 was their equivalent, designed for goods and passenger work. The sight of one belting along those big driving wheels must have been quite something.

 

Malcolm Crawley had a plan to build all the GNR types that lasted into LNER days and he did most of them. His J1 used lots of bits from the LRM J6, with new splashers and a few other bits. I don't think he ever did a J2 but he did all the other J classes.

 

I would certainly be interested if the J1 became available as a kit. One in full GNR livery would look superb.

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3 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

That looks beautiful work, Frank.

 

One thing which intrigues is the non-painting of the frames.

 

After I'm happy that I've built a set of (rigid) frames correctly, the first thing I do is paint their outsides - behind the drivers. That way, once I'm then happy that the drive is sweet, the drivers are in place and the rods are on to produce a sweet-running prime mover, nothing then has to be taken off to paint. 

 

I assume the drivers have now to be taken off/dropped out to paint the frames? By the painter? Do you then reassemble the chassis? 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

Hi Tony,

 

Your assumptions are correct.  The model will now be dismantled for painting (hopefully by that nice Mr Rathbone) including a wheel from each axle to allow them to be removed from the frames.   The exception to this is the tender's inside frames which I have already painted with cellulose rattle can paint but only because of the need to fully install the ball races used in my 'motor in tender' drive system in order to test run the model.  I don't think the bearings  would react well to being subsequently sprayed with paint.  When the chassis is reassembled the wheels will be fitted with Locktite to eliminate the risk of them going off quarter.  I have never had any problems rebuilding a chassis successfully after painting by Ian, but of course there is always a first time.  I hope you haven't jinxed it Tony...

 

Further to Andrew's and Tony's (G) question, as with all my projects I will be offering the etches to John at LRM and hopefully he will be releasing a kit sometime next year.  This is why I will be running off another (final?) set of test etches to ensure all the mistakes I have had to contend with will not exist in the LRM offering.    John has all the castings required for the J1 so there should not be any problems with releasing the  J1 kit unlike the J7 which has been stalled because of the need for a new casting for the reverser. 

 

Regards,

 

Frank

 

 

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17 hours ago, Clem said:

I have a strong suspicion that we're going to lose another 12" to the foot signal box again tonight. Notices in Bingham, Notts of road closure starting at midnight tonight at the level crossing where the GN signal box still stands albeit devoid of steps. If I'm correct, it breaks my heart to see such destruction.

 

Well, panic over! Just back from Bingham and I don't know what they closed the road for at the level crossing, but it wasn't to demolish the signal box. To clarify why I was so worried about it, they actually published the date that they intended to demolish it a couple or so years ago and there was such an outcry from the local community that they deferred it. But they made it clear at the time that it was just a temporary reprieve. So I am much relieved that it still stands and while it does, there is hope it will eventually permanently survive.

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Tony (and others),

 

Can I ask a question about MJT coach kit construction. I’m building a D.190 short CK - the all steel version which went in the Peterborough semi 5 sets. I’m using Southern Pride sides on a MJT floorpan as shown.

2DF17CA7-07BD-49FC-89D4-52BA8175B444.jpeg.141d7665a3211611d1639ff42120870e.jpeg
The next step in the instructions suggest that I solder the sides to the inners ends and upturned lip of the floor. This would make it impossible to separate the coach at the bottom of the sides where I normally do it. Instead I presume I would have to separate it at the roof line (I don’t have that bit of the MJT instructions though). 
 

I know that Tony and others on here state a preference for separating coaches at the bottom of the sides. My question is, how do I do this using the MJT floor? Or am I too late to change course now?!


Thanks In advance for any help?

 

Andy

 

 

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Andy,

 

You are correct that that is how MJT carriages are designed to be built.    Take a look at the first carriage I built for Grantham here to see how I changed the method of construction.  I've built every subsequent carriage in the same way.   I was going to ask you whether the D210 you built separates at the roof or solebar as I shall have to make the same modification to mine now I've had the chance to examine the etches closely.

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I have one coach body that I have built following the instructions. It's sitting in a box while I try and decide whether to finish it or pull it apart and re-do without the sides and ends permanently fixed to the underframe as I also prefer to do it that way. The coaches in the to-do pile all come with etched ends so I just removed the fold up flaps at the sides and ends which leaves a flat surface:

 

20201011_220215.jpg.97450d3b8012ddf6dcec76f8064e77da.jpg

Edited by Bucoops
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On 27/09/2020 at 11:30, LNER4479 said:

'North of Watford' was how I've always known it described.

 

Meanwhile, living in the north, the converse expression to refer to 'suvvenas' was anywhere south of Stoke ... which means that the Midlands ends up being in no-man's land.

Coming from Lancashire I always thought that the Mersey (or perhaps the Ship Canal) divided the North from the Midlands.  I think it's too simplistic to just have one division, especially when people from East Anglia or the West Country are lumped in as 'Southerners'.  Perhaps it comes down to simplistic lazy journalists. 

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14 hours ago, thegreenhowards said:

Tony (and others),

 

Can I ask a question about MJT coach kit construction. I’m building a D.190 short CK - the all steel version which went in the Peterborough semi 5 sets. I’m using Southern Pride sides on a MJT floorpan as shown.

2DF17CA7-07BD-49FC-89D4-52BA8175B444.jpeg.141d7665a3211611d1639ff42120870e.jpeg
The next step in the instructions suggest that I solder the sides to the inners ends and upturned lip of the floor. This would make it impossible to separate the coach at the bottom of the sides where I normally do it. Instead I presume I would have to separate it at the roof line (I don’t have that bit of the MJT instructions though). 
 

I know that Tony and others on here state a preference for separating coaches at the bottom of the sides. My question is, how do I do this using the MJT floor? Or am I too late to change course now?!


Thanks In advance for any help?

 

Andy

 

 

Good morning Andy,

 

I think others have expertly explained how to 'divide' their carriages.

 

Many thanks to them.

 

I use very similar methods, because I always think it's better to have the roof permanently attached to the body/ends. Either way, it's highly-desirable to be able to subsequently get inside a carriage after it's been built/painted. As you know, I have a few 'damaged' Coachman's carriages which I've been able to repair (to an extent). However, because there's no easy way of now getting inside them (everything is 'permanently' fixed together with glue or solder!), things like pushed-in windows and internal detail free to currently move around (because the Evo-Stik has failed) cannot really be satisfactorily remedied; which means that some of those carriages have sides which face away from viewers! Strange, isn't it, that the glue holding the main bits together (though it could be solder) has bonded much more substantially than the stuff which is (was) supposed to hold the seats, tables and partitions in place, inside?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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14 hours ago, jwealleans said:

Andy,

 

You are correct that that is how MJT carriages are designed to be built.    Take a look at the first carriage I built for Grantham here to see how I changed the method of construction.  I've built every subsequent carriage in the same way.   I was going to ask you whether the D210 you built separates at the roof or solebar as I shall have to make the same modification to mine now I've had the chance to examine the etches closely.

Thanks Jonathan,

 

That looks similar to Mike’s method. It’s fairly obvious now you show it but I was blindly following the instructions - Sir wouldn’t approve! I will use one of your or Mike’s methods.

 

As for the D210, mine was Mousa sides with the rest cobbled together - 247 ends, copper clad floorpan, MJT roof and underframe bits. It separates at the sole bar using the two screws you can see in this picture.

24FFA23D-578F-4BC8-863A-098E9CCF9D3B.jpeg.6d5a897c56a72fb7235aa54d924ea0fd.jpeg

Inside it looks like I glued some of the interior to the floorpan but the ends were glued into the body so as to clear the brass ‘cross members’ which hold the retaining nuts for the floor.

39C2694A-E4FF-473D-8079-EFE6B226F3A6.jpeg.d15c52b72c54c05be190372beeb95b65.jpeg

 

Hope that helps

 

Andy

 

 

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

Strange, isn't it, that the glue holding the main bits together (though it could be solder) has bonded much more substantially than the stuff which is (was) supposed to hold the seats, tables and partitions in place, inside?

 

I think there’s a ‘law’ for that but I won’t repeat it here!

 

Thanks everyone for the help.

 

Andy

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Although they are "latest design", the Bill Bedford / Mousa Models 3D printed kits for GNR 6 wheeled carriages that I've recently built did not have what I considered to be a good arrangement for later access to the interiors, so I made a modification to those. As supplied, it would appear (although there are no specific instructions on the matter) that the main body module is meant to be glued onto the floor / solebars / headstocks module, and (once the glazing is slotted in) the roof is a clip-fit onto the rest of the assembly. It is demonstrably possible to un-clip the roof again, without damage, if you are both careful and lucky, but I know of some who haven't manage to do that without grief. I therefore glued, as firmly as possible, some plastic blocks into either the lower corners of the body modules, or under the moulded seats at the corners of the floor module, so that either screws through the floor from below, or pins through the carriage end, depending on what would actually fit in with the rest of the model, could be used to mount the body separably on the underframe. That saves any worries about removal of the roof, and in fact opens up the opportunity to glue down the edges of the roof, thus avoiding any undesirable gaps between roofs and sides.

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20 hours ago, Clem said:

Well, panic over! Just back from Bingham and I don't know what they closed the road for at the level crossing, but it wasn't to demolish the signal box. To clarify why I was so worried about it, they actually published the date that they intended to demolish it a couple or so years ago and there was such an outcry from the local community that they deferred it. But they made it clear at the time that it was just a temporary reprieve. So I am much relieved that it still stands and while it does, there is hope it will eventually permanently survive.

 

Doesn't look like anything changed over the weekend, this is Lowdham box, well the last bits, a few minutes ago

 

IMG_20201012_131746143.jpg.727b60325c3a073a91270ee0ba635b20.jpg

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3 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

I use very similar methods, because I always think it's better to have the roof permanently attached to the body/ends. Either way, it's highly-desirable to be able to subsequently get inside a carriage after it's been built/painted.

 

I acquired this set of beautiful Connoisseur 7mm S&D coaches a little while back. While they're painted and lined to an outstanding standard, I can't see any way into them without risking damage to the finish. It's a shame as while nothing has come loose, I'd like to be able to add passengers. If they weren't built so nicely, I wouldn't be so concerned about damaging them.

 

train.jpg.bcb612f831a72e36b8b11e116e8cce1b.jpg

 

I have an equivalent set to build in 4mm so with those I will certainly be making the insides accessible.

 

Al

 

 

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1 hour ago, great central said:

Doesn't look like anything changed over the weekend, this is Lowdham box, well the last bits, a few minutes ago

I wonder why they've taken the window frames out? It doesn't make a lot of sense unless they're somehow trying to remove the lever frame without taking the roof off. (Good luck with that, if so). 

I always think of Lowdham as having (to my knowledge) the last main line single slip in Notts into the single siding which was the goods yard. In the end it was taken out a few years back but there's still some isolated track there.

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1 hour ago, Iain.d said:

I have finally completed my latest 1980s Hornby Stanier rebuilds: a D1903 Composite Open and a D1999 Third Open – I say finally as these two seem to have taken an age. Mind you I’ve also been doing a GW Auto Trailer and an LMS Restaurant Car, a Ratio SR wagon, and a half dozen or so other little jobs…as well as working, keeping a house, getting the garden ready for summer, having a WA holiday staycation….so I can’t really complain!

 

Here they are, pre the body being fitted back to the chassis. I have probably ‘over painted’ the interiors for what will, and can, be seen through the windows. But if I ever get around to building a layout and I end up taking pictures, sure as eggs are eggs there’ll be some part of the interior that hasn’t been done. There’s also the possibility, one day, that I might fit interior lights.

 

D1903 Composite Open:

1957312521_D1903M9755M(2).jpg.89f30ad86962d7c335f8fa18ee4914d3.jpg

 

D1999 Third Open:

1475212352_D1999M9436M(2).jpg.6dc08b7063f1bf5a9893a24752aed521.jpg

 

And complete, less corridor connectors. I think they scrub up pretty well and stand a reasonable level of scrutiny.  I'm not quite satisfied how the ends mate up to the sides and roof, but that's related to the original design by Hornby and not worth the effort to rectify, but with the added detail of filler pipes, handrails, gangway suspension thingies, lamp brackets, electrical connectors and alarm gear the right impression is there.  The roof ribs are reasonably pronounced, but I can live with these; in some of the images I have of these carriages they were/are quite obvious, much more so than the BR Mk1. I've also built these to run in rakes of like vehicles (bar the odd one or two) so, as they are all the same, the ribs are kind of hidden in plain view, if that makes sense. I need to cut back the bogie fixing bolts.

 

1368219093_D1903M9755M(1).jpg.e18aa3f9262906147e40134b20c62b26.jpg

 

115770352_D1999M9436M(1).jpg.cea2ef7d0ea7a5174c5a2d9915b2cb89.jpg

 

I am quite pleased how the curtains and table lamps came out in the first class section of the D1903. The curtains are blanket ribbon (I think that’s what it’s called) glued to a little frame cut from plastic card, I then tie a couple of wraps of cotton about a third of the way up to represent the tie backs – everyone is slightly different. The little assembly is then glued to the back of the glass. Though a faff and fiddle to make I think these are better than painted on curtains. I never had much luck with the MJT ones either, I could never get them to look more than a painted casting - due to my inability rather than the product!

 

224599944_D1903TablesandLamps(Close).jpg.ad20fdd72e3e6a5646c90dcdf46bb0c5.jpg

 

Kind regards,

 

Iain

Beautiful work, Iain,

 

Thanks for showing us. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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