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iL Dottore

The Refurbished Boozer "Mr Brunel's Hat"

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Well, after much swearing*, some disasters with uncontrollable interiors spraying glue everywhere and a lot of making good,  I have finally completed the major part of my (fairly) prototypical interpretation of the Old Blue Last Pub in Shoreditch. Unravelled's windows are superb and manage to survive all the cr*p that went flying around when trying to fit the interiors. With the addition of some posters to hide the worst of the smears (and with the promise of some light weathering to come), it didn't turn out too bad (although I can see all the bodges, errors, foul ups, etc., etc.).

 

Lessons have been learnt, although too late for this build, and I have sketched out some "best practices" for building curved buildings (I can post them, if anyone's interested).

 

So here are some pictures and comments.

 

It's a big beast:

post-123-0-93730700-1376337009.jpg

 

But a handsome one, from all sides - thanks to Dave's (Unravelled) great laser cut windows (lovely to assemble, look superb, but a right PIG to glue together...[thanks to the plastic used])

post-123-0-16496400-1376337234_thumb.jpg post-123-0-70369600-1376337254.jpg

This snap, shows off the windows quite well:

post-123-0-28527400-1376337293.jpg

The interiors may have been (no, were) a PITA to do, but under low light, the pub seems quite cosy and welcoming - I'm sure the inhabitants of Brunel Terrace cherish "their" boozer:

post-123-0-64301700-1376337453.jpg post-123-0-06210300-1376337480.jpg

post-123-0-61910500-1376337497.jpg Someone needs to give that window a good clean.... post-123-0-12263500-1376337532.jpg

post-123-0-56967600-1376337548.jpg

Like all good theatre, costumes, paint and lighting cover a multitude of sins... the "naked" rear shows a more sordid picture:

post-123-0-41057100-1376337627.jpg

 

The next step will be to sort out the chimney pots (including straightening a bent chimney stack using a focussed hair dryer), add the rear and then the roof. Once that is done I can build the courtyard and add the pavement and street lamps... Oh, and make good (again...)

 

As always, ribald commentary, informed critical assessment and shameless flattery welcome. :thankyou:

 

iD

* I mean really, really £$%* swearing: practically every @:{£"^&% minute I was trying to put that ^&*£"!+ interior into the "£!^&%@ pub

 

 

Edited by iL Dottore
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Please remind me, what do you use for lighting?

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Please remind me, what do you use for lighting?

Hi John,

 

I'm using 6 bright white 12v LEDs, which I have toned down with a good coat of Tamiya matt yellow (I didn't have enough warm white LEDs to do the whole building).

 

iD

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Well Flavio, I'd say that is a jolly good representation of the original - you SHOULD be proud and pleased with your work - well worth looking at!

Edited by shortliner

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Hi Flavio,

 

I'm thinking a yellow LED with a variable resistor in-line might be an alternative; that way you get differing light levels in each room and not too expensive!

 

Permit me some further research, please!

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Hi Flavio,

 

I'm thinking a yellow LED with a variable resistor in-line might be an alternative; that way you get differing light levels in each room and not too expensive!

 

Permit me some further research, please!

Please do, I'd be interested to see what you can come up with.

 

iD

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Progress IS being made, albeit very, very slowly.

 

I have just about finished cutting and fitting the templates for the roofing and have just about finished the framework that will support the pavement, road and delivery yard behind the pub (the latter will be a minimalistic reppresentation).

 

I hope that enough progress will have been made to post pictures next weekend.

 

iD

Edited by iL Dottore
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I'm a Refurbished Boozer - and feel the better for it...........

 

Best, Pete.

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Well, after much delay and faffing about, I have finally moved the pub forward a bit. I've finally finished cutting out the under/roof/roof support (currently just tacked into place), completed the street/back of pub base (to be clad in cobblestones and paving - as appropriate) and stuck on a few chimney pots.

 

Photos as follows>

post-123-0-59081700-1382887626.jpg post-123-0-27569200-1382887639.jpg

 

post-123-0-40016300-1382887658.jpg post-123-0-50670700-1382887678.jpg

 

As can be seen, usual dodgy workmanship from "Bodge & Sons".... However, these relatively crude "roof supports" will be used as both patterns for cutting out the SEF embossed plasticsheet "slates" (I'll cut oversize and trim back) and - when firmly glued into position - strengtheners/supports for the thin SEF sheet. I also have a horrible feeling that I will need to lay individual slates on some of the curved roofing...

 

After putting in the "sub/floor" (if you will) for the pavement and pub yard, I noticed that I will have a large triangular space to fill, as shown>

 

post-123-0-65764000-1382887839.jpg

 

I'm thinking either  a derelict/semi-derelict/working warehouse OR worker's terraced housing.

 

Any suggestions as to which would best fit, warehouse or houses? Thoughts? Ideas?

Edited by iL Dottore
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Flavio,

I said terraced houses because around the corner in Spitalfields that are some interesting houses that were lived in by the Huguenots after they had fled to London - a lot of them settled in that general area.

As usual when I want I cannot find any photos of them....

 

Best, Pete.

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F.

This may prove inspiring for you:

 

http://spitalfieldslife.com/2013/04/14/the-huguenots-of-spitalfields/

 

 

Best, Pete.

 

Thanks Pete, they certainly are inspiring, but I can't really do them justice in the corner I have to fill. BUT (but, but, but...) if I can plausibly add some to my layout (which is "somewhere on the Welsh borders") I will certainly do so.

 

Alas, something more pedestrian will have to go in that corner....

 

F

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Hi Flavio,

that's a tasty looking model, looks great, very well modelled.

cheers

Peter

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Rather than a derelict building, what about a missing one - demolished after war damage? Three walls, some funny wallpaper from the rooms that were, large props to keep the thing upright, high corrugated fencing to the pavement.

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Thanks Pete, they certainly are inspiring, but I can't really do them justice in the corner I have to fill. BUT (but, but, but...) if I can plausibly add some to my layout (which is "somewhere on the Welsh borders") I will certainly do so.

 

Alas, something more pedestrian will have to go in that corner....

 

F

Not many people believe that such attractive houses can exist in Spitalfields........personally I love that area. My Grandfather had a company based in Spitalfields market. Slap bang in the middle of "Jack the Ripper" territory.

 

Best, Pete.

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..."I also have a horrible feeling that I will need to lay individual slates on some of the curved roofing..."

 

IL Detorre, you've really done a terrific job on that building, don't let a few individual tiles deter you now - remember, the roof is the largest single expanse on a building and, as a model, it gets viewed first. A roof can make or break a good model as I've seen hundreds of times at exhibitions and in the press where the modeller has given it no more thought than a few curling strips of paper as a quick and nasty means to an end and in doing so has magnificently managed to ruin hundreds of hours work.

 

Cheers.

Allan

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Rather than a derelict building, what about a missing one - demolished after war damage? Three walls, some funny wallpaper from the rooms that were, large props to keep the thing upright, high corrugated fencing to the pavement.

Hmm, a not unattractive proposal. But my chosen period (1930s) and location (Welsh Borders [English side]) make it unlikely for a war damaged property to be (roughly) prototypical. I don't think the Zeppelins made it as far as Shropshire.

 

However, if anyone wants to "acquire" (hem-hem) such a structure from me, I'd be open to proposals

 

..."I also have a horrible feeling that I will need to lay individual slates on some of the curved roofing..."

 

IL Detorre, you've really done a terrific job on that building, don't let a few individual tiles deter you now - remember, the roof is the largest single expanse on a building and, as a model, it gets viewed first. A roof can make or break a good model as I've seen hundreds of times at exhibitions and in the press where the modeller has given it no more thought than a few curling strips of paper as a quick and nasty means to an end and in doing so has magnificently managed to ruin hundreds of hours work.

 

Cheers.

Allan

Very kind (and much prized) words from such a master builder. Thank you.

 

Indeed, I do plan on laying the tiles individually on the highly curved part of the roof. Using SEF thin embossed plastic tile sheets, I plan on using sheets to cover the "flat" section, strips cut from the SEF embossed sheets for the slightly curved roofing and individual tiles for the complex curves.

 

A question though, Allan. Should I lay the individual tiles first, or lay first the sheets, then the strips and finally the individual tiles (which is my current plan).

 

iD

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UPDATE

 

Roofs and pavement finished, terrace house shell completed, cobbled yard installed.

 

Pictures by this p.m.

 

iD

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Hmm, a not unattractive proposal. But my chosen period (1930s) and location (Welsh Borders [English side]) make it unlikely for a war damaged property to be (roughly) prototypical. I don't think the Zeppelins made it as far as Shropshire.

 

However, if anyone wants to "acquire" (hem-hem) such a structure from me, I'd be open to proposals

 

Very kind (and much prized) words from such a master builder. Thank you.

 

Indeed, I do plan on laying the tiles individually on the highly curved part of the roof. Using SEF thin embossed plastic tile sheets, I plan on using sheets to cover the "flat" section, strips cut from the SEF embossed sheets for the slightly curved roofing and individual tiles for the complex curves.

 

A question though, Allan. Should I lay the individual tiles first, or lay first the sheets, then the strips and finally the individual tiles (which is my current plan).

 

iD

 

iD.

 

How lax of me, I forgot to answer your post !

 

Well I really don't know what to suggest as curved, flat or otherwise, I would use in]dividual tiles anyway  and here is an example of an individually tiled curved roof.

 

Cheers.

Allan.

 

post-18579-0-53705400-1387542483_thumb.jpg

Edited by allan downes

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Thanks for the reply, Allan.

 

I ended up using strips and locking haemostats. I'd clamp one tile in a strip, then using a second haemostat I'd grasp the ajacent tile and gently bend the strip. The slight stretching of the plastic between the tiles was sufficient to give me an adequate curvature. Mind you, it doesn't look as good as your individually laid tiles.

 

Thank goodness for paint, it does cover a multitude of sins...

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