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With my layout suffering a bit of a setback, I thought I would turn my attention to the stock.

Weathering has long been a dark art to me so I thought I would practice on one of my Bachmann Bagnalls.

So, armed with some Humbrol weathering powders and a rattle can of acrylic matt varnish, off I toddled to the dining table. I decided not to renumber in case it went the way of the pear.

 

I wanted the look of a working loco but not one that looked on its last legs. Slightly distressed but not completely distraught, so to speak.

Coal and fire irons to follow.

 

 

Rob

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Edited by NHY 581
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  • RMweb Gold

Spent the evening with a 7F on the dining table.

I have to say I am not entirely happy with the outcome or as satisfied as I was with the 3F.

Decided to stop and look again with a fresh pair of eyes in a day or so. So , not finished but a work in progress photo.

 

Rob

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Good job so far.  I've only just started using Humbrol weathering powders, and finding them a lot of fun to use.  Certainly far better than paint for weathering effects.  I find it takes several goes over a number of days to get the right effect.  If you haven#t already, have a look at the

for some good tips.

Thanks, GF. Had a look at the Humbrol videos when I started. Still not sure about the 7F, hence waking away from it for a bit. I agree, easy to use, even for a numpty such as I.

I am having fun. That's all that matters.

 

Rob

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Thanks, Pete. I was working from a couple of photos of 53806 in a couple of books. There was a lot more of a variation in colour, up to the point where I applied a coat of Matt acrylic varnish to hold it all in place. However it was all lost. The dark earth just disappeared. I am thinking too much varnish but I only gave if a light dusting, so not sure.

 

Not to worry. It's all learning.

 

Rob.

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Ah, the dreaded varnish effect! Adding varnish to fix a finish is understandable but in my experience it always alters the look of a surface. However all is not lost. Previous applications of powders may well have become less easy to see once varnished but they might also provide a key which will hold further applications without needing to varnish again.

 

I don't use weathering powders but I often add talc to just painted (still tacky) painted surfaces. This gives a gritty surface texture - just right for a steam loco - on top of which further paint or your weathering powders can be added.

 

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Varnish has a nasty habit of changing the colours and hues of the weathering. I am not sure how well the Humbrol powders stick but look out SDJR88's thread on here as he does use them.

 

As Pete says the more photos in colour you can find the better.

 

Don't forget the underframe and wheels/motion, but so far looking good...nice and subtle.

 

Baz

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One of the Humbrol videos I watched was using decal fix or varnish as part of the initial application.  This seems to get past the problem of overspraying later which always changes the hues, and sometimes loses them altogether.

 

Good point to always work from a photo of the real thing, although in the case of the steam era photos be aware of how inaccurate the colour reproductions often are.

 

I have scads of my own reference photos I work from, but I'm no great shakes at this weathering lark.  Getting better though.

 

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Thanks for the advice chaps.

 

Chaz/ GF, loving your work.

 

Baz, praise indeed. Thank you again. I am sure it is because I used too much varnish. The 3F had a very light dusting whereas the 7F had a bit more. I intend to try another 3F before revisiting the 7F.

 

All good though and enjoying this no end.

 

Rob.

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Not as planned but had some spare time early evening so had a tweak at the 7F.

I am happier with it now. Still work to do below the foot plate and then adding crew, fire irons etc.....so still in progress.

 

Some interim photos then, including some cruel close ups.

 

Rob

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A couple of observations if I may.

 

GF suggests Dullcote - this is probably the best matte varnish you could use but it is still a varnish and may therefore change the look of your model yet again. It maybe best to test it out first on a sample.

 

Be wary of too many rust colours. Generally steam locos still in service would get dirty with soot and ash, grease and oil, and in some places water stains from dribbles etc. Rust was usually limited to those places where paint would habitually burn-away - the ash-pan and the bottom of the smokebox door, if this was a poor fit.  Best thing to do - as always - is to check photos of the real thing, although colour shots of 7Fs are probably thin on the ground!   I know that colour shots of ex-LNER J50s certainly are.....

 

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Hope that's some help.

 

Chaz

 

PS - I really like the oily look around the crosshead and slidebars on your 7F - whatever else you do to the model keep that as it is. :sungum:

Edited by chaz
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Thanks Chaz, GF. I think part of what's happening here is down to the photos themselves. In the flesh...er..metal..er plastic, the colours are more muted but the camera on my phone has enriched the shades a tad. I know what you mean about rust. I really don't like those models that look like they came out of Woodhams.

I was working from three photos all in all. Two of 53806 and one of 53809. The rust on the piston rod covers seems a constant. In addition these locos worked hard over the Mendips so I guess, as a result, the smoke box got a bit warm.

I am in two minds really. Dull cote does seem a good idea but I don't wish to lose the lighter shades. I may try to blend in a bit more grey and see what happens.

 

Thanks again for your comments, chaps. As I said earlier, weathering is a new game to me.

All good stuff.

One thing I have learnt. I need better lighting when working!!!!

 

Rob

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Another Jinty then. The difference being that this was done by my 11yr old son this afternoon as we watched the rugby. Bit more to do but we are happy with this. Worked from a couple of Micheal Welch photos.

 

Best way to spend an afternoon. Proper dad and son stuff. Priceless.

 

Proud Rob

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Another Jinty then. The difference being that this was done by my 11yr old son this afternoon as we watched the rugby. Bit more to do but we are happy with this. Worked from a couple of Micheal Welch photos.

 

Best way to spend an afternoon. Proper dad and son stuff. Priceless.

 

Proud Rob

Nicely understated job; tidier than the match, as well...

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • RMweb Gold

Latest product from the dining table...

 

Bachmann 4F, 43875. Genuine Somerset and Dorset loco, based at Bath in the 1950s. .

 

Sticking with the powders. Bit more to do re coal and fire irons but feel as if I am getting there. Next up is some coaching stock and a few wagons.

 

Rob

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Very nice so far, keep posting your progress!

 

If I might suggest going for a warmer browny/grey/black and completely flat finish for the smokebox?  My limited understanding of steam locomotives seems to suggest they were a different finish or material to boiler cladding.

 

Also, coal can be safely glossy and black unless you're modelling the brown gravel I saw Chinese steamers trying to burn back in '92!

 

Here's one of my bad jobs from a few years ago.

 

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I never got round to fitting a real coal load which would have made it look better.

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  • 2 months later...
  • RMweb Gold

Been a bit quiet as of late but managed a bit. Here's some photos of a 4500 tank engine and a couple of Stanier coaches. I have previously popped these on a different thread.

 

Still learning but happy with these so far.

 

Rob

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  • 2 months later...

Hi rob,

 

Loving the work so far. If I may give a little advice though?

 

First up, regards fixing the powders, some hair spray is a good option to try. It seems to effect colour a little less than varnish.

 

Another point that comes to mind, why not try mixing and matching between powders and paints? Both Humberol and Phoenix do fantastic ranges to play with, in a range of finishes. The 56XX in my avatar photo is one example of a mixed media. Another is using a small dab of Humberol Metcote Gunmetal stippled onto a buffer head to replicate grease marks. It has just enough shine to look the part, a similar method can be used on the edges of gangway connectors.

 

 

I would also suggest you try and take your pics in more natural light if at all possible! It shows the subtleties of your work infinatly better than artificial light.

 

Keep up the good work my friend, please keep the photos coming and I hope I dont come across as being negative or picky!

 

Sean

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Thanks for waking up the thread, Sean. Your comments are valued. Not dons a lot as of late but I think you may have given me the prod I needed.

 

The hairspray thing sounds like a plan and I may well give it a try. Hopefully post up a little something in due course.

 

Rob.

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No worries rob, I love to see what others are upto, it often gives me ideas. I will add Tesco Value hairspray seems to work well enough, and cheap enough not to break the bank.

 

I look forward to more.

 

Sean

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