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Ardmore

Teignbridge (change for Upcombe branch)

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Lovely layout. I found it rather difficult in my OO days to achieve anything like this over here. Local model shops didn't carry much that was suitable which resulted in delays getting supplies from the UK which included the ever increasing postage. I have since changed layouts but still get great pleasure from seeing layouts such as yours which offer more than the basic terminus.

 

Brian.

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I thought I would add the track plans for the two stations before doing anything else. I have imagined that Teignbridge is somewhere on the South Devon main line between Newton Abbot and Plymouth. Leaving Teignbridge the branch line loops round outside the main lines and through the storage sidings before heading to the terminus at Upcombe. The time period is 1959 to 1961. 

 

Teignbridge

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Upcombe

post-16862-0-49814000-1422223810_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks for reading.

 

David

 

 

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Absolutely delightful layout, thanks for posting and would love to see more photos.

 

Did you realise that there is still a real Teignbridge railway location? It's on the Heathfield branch (ie. what's left of the Moretonhampstead branch), and it's where Colas Rail still load timber to trains (although they are gradually moving the operation to Exeter).

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Always nice to see another Devon based Western layout especially when you shew a small prairie. Keep the photos coming and I do like your footbridge.

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I like the way you have created a spacious feel and, to me at least, it is unmistakably South Devon. The Devon General bus in the forecourt reminds me of the many West Country holidays of my youth!

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Wow some absolute fantastic modelling on show here. Its seeing layouts like this that really spurs me on to get on with me own project , yes you got it ' the layout of a life-time'

 

The bridges and viaduct make for real 'scene depth' and seem to make the layout appear larger than it probably is. What I find so impressive is the 'doctoring' of the code 75 peco track and have to admit to scaning through the photo's at first and thought that the trackwork was finescale until I read through the notes.

I look forward to seeing further developments in the painting and weathering department , such a shame is on the other side of the pond though it would be great to see it at a show. 

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We can't have enough Devon Based Layouts on here, particularly if they are going to be of this standard.

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David; I can only echo the views expressed already, this layout is evolving nicely.

 

May I ask about the viaduct please...is that scratch built or an adaption of a kit/purchased one. It looks really good and seems to have a slight curve? How have you gone about that?

 

regards, Andy R

New Zealand

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What a lovely little layout! It look so spacious and well thought out. Thank you for sharing!

 

Would it be possible to have a wide shot of the whole layout please? If space allows of course.....

 

I'm possibly being thick, but where is your fiddle/storage yard? Would we be able to see behind the scenes?

Edited by scottystitch

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Thanks to members who have offered comments on my layout-building efforts. As a new poster, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but the feedback so far has been very encouraging. Over the last several years, I have learnt a huge amount from this web site, not least from following such excellent GWR and BR(WR) topics as ‘A Nod to Brent’, ‘Hintock’, ‘Much Murkle’ and ‘Wencombe’.

 

Turning to the first of the queries that have been posted, the viaduct is based on the Wills kit. As designed, this is intended to be constructed on the straight. However, because I wanted it to form the central feature on one corner of the layout, I had to make some adaptations. The first photograph shows the intended location. The layout trackbed is 48 inches above floor level, but the benchwork under the viaduct is 8 inches lower.

 

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The viaduct is built on a 90 degree curve, with transition radii at both ends, and a limiting radius of 36 inches. I had designed the layout using Anyrail, so I printed out the relevant part of the plan full size, and glued it to the half-inch plywood sheet that would form the road bed. I then cut the plywood parallel to, and 1 inch distant from the edges of the rail. The second photograph is of one end of the viaduct under construction, showing how it matches up to the track approaching it.

 

post-16862-0-41645900-1422377894_thumb.jpg

 

The viaduct is attached to the baseboard beneath it by plywood formers at both ends. Because the baseboard is wedge-shaped (narrowest at the front), it didn’t need to be screwed to the framing underneath it. It can be slid in or out from the back, and with the backscene installed, it is secured in position. This allowed me to do a lot of the work sitting at my workbench rather than leaning over the layout.

 

I assembled the viaduct itself from the top down, starting on the inner side of the curve (nearest to the viewer). Using a strong epoxy adhesive and clamps, I attached each arch section in turn to the plywood roadbed. The plastic is quite thick, but flexible. I learnt through experience that the arches are liable to become detached if insufficient adhesive was applied and the clamps were removed too soon.

 

Once I had attached all the upper arches, I then added the near-side end of each of the columns. Because the viaduct is curved, and the sides of the arches need to be parallel to each other (in real life the structure would otherwise collapse), the columns are ‘vee’-shaped. The third photograph shows the far (outer side) of the structure.

 

post-16862-0-29736700-1422378123_thumb.jpg

 

Here you can see the plastic filets that were inserted between each of the outer arch sections, and the columns beneath. The last, and most challenging part of the whole project was inserting the plastic brick sheeting beneath the arches, but I somehow managed to get this done.

 

Thanks for viewing.

 

David

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where is your fiddle/storage yard? Would we be able to see behind the scenes?

 

Thanks for your interest. Here are a couple of photographs taken during construction showing the location of the storage sidings in relation to the junction station  (Teignbridge). In the first photograph, the storage sidings are on the right, next to the wall. At this stage, I hadn't started to lay the branch line track (which runs outside the main lines). 

 

post-16862-0-26220800-1422381313_thumb.jpg

 

In the second picture, looking in the opposite direction, the station is on the right. The branch line and goods yard is to the right of the main lines. This baseboard is 3 foot 9 inches across. However, the back scene is split into sections (max. length 4 foot), and can be unbolted to allow access.

 

post-16862-0-69402500-1422381451_thumb.jpg

 

The third picture shows the 11 storage sidings: 3 for the branch (on the left), 4 for the down main line (in the middle), and 4 for the up main line (on the right). The longest sidings can hold a locomotive and 9 coaches, and the shortest can hold an engine and 5 coaches (and variations thereof).

 

post-16862-0-12266700-1422381621_thumb.jpg

 

I mentioned in my original post that I used Peco code 75 track and points, but modified the sleeper spacings on the track, and removed and replaced some of the plastic from the points. This picture shows what I was able to achieve. PH Designs supply a very useful template for spacing the sleepers evenly, and DCC Components supply self-adhesive 'tie bar ballast labels' which fit under the turnout and hide most of the hole drilled in the baseboard.

 

post-16862-0-76697800-1422382028_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks for viewing.

 

David

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Cracking layout!  I look forward to seeing the scenery develop further.  I don't usually prefer WR layouts, but this is one of the few exceptions.

 

The photos are excellent as well.

 

Cheers,

William

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Now that I do like.More please, speed to the West.

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What a lovely layout! Excellent work on the baseboards.

 

Kind regards,

Nick.

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Ardmore, many thanks for your excellent illustrated description of the building of the viaduct. This has helped me in my thinking about the viaduct at one end of my layout which also needs to be curved but not through 90 degrees like yours. I  may not necessarily use the Wills kit (looking at one on internet for potential purchase and they do look sharp) ... I might yet follow my normal technique of using foamboard as the base covered with slaters embossed stone. But your step by step illustration gives me confidence to move into that area of the layout for the next scenic steps. So, thank you for taking the time to reply to my query.

 

Your baseboard consruction is very thorough and beautifully crafted looking at the photos. Look forward to more posts as you are able.

 

Andy R

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Could you tell  more about the backscene; its so much better than my old Peco ones which are beginning to get a bit dated.  Are they available suitable for O scale?

 

Brian.

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Could you tell  more about the backscene; its so much better than my old Peco ones which are beginning to get a bit dated.  Are they available suitable for O scale?

 

Brian.

 

The id Backscene range is produced by a company called Art Printers (www.art-printers.com). Their website states that some of the scenes are suitable for O gauge, but I think it's going to depend on what's in the foreground. There are a good number of stockists in the UK, but I got mine from AJM Railways (www.ajmrailways.com) who specialize in supplying the international market (VAT free). I have no connection with them other than as a satisfied customer.

 

David  

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The id Backscene range is produced by a company called Art Printers (www.art-printers.com). Their website states that some of the scenes are suitable for O gauge, but I think it's going to depend on what's in the foreground. There are a good number of stockists in the UK, but I got mine from AJM Railways (www.ajmrailways.com) who specialize in supplying the international market (VAT free). I have no connection with them other than as a satisfied customer.

 

David  

 

I have the ID Backscene (Hills and Dales 206) range on my layout and they are indeed very good :)

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